Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


'•Ait. 



$ 







PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris, Monday, November 7, 1994 


No. 34,739 



D ' . _ T.mi C»uNa\..v. \ t wnt >- rjnr-Pircr 

Bosnian government forces pressing their assault Sunday on Serbian troops near the city of Kupres, one of several successful drives by the Muslim-led army. 


Bosnian Serbs: In Retreat , or Just Regrouping? 


By Roger Cohen. 

New York Tuna Service 

ZAGREB, Croatia — A long stalemate 
in the Bosnian war has abruptly given way 
to a flurry of victories by Muslim-led gov- 
ernment forces that pose a central ques- 
tion: Is the Bosnian Serbian Army on the 
run? 

The question would have been unthink- 
able two weeks ago,when the superiority 
of the Bosnian Serbs in artillery, tanks and 
military organization seemed as impregna- 
ble as throughout the previously one-sided 
war over the last 31 months. 

But the Bosnian Serbian defeats on sev- 
eral fronts, their wholesale abandonment 
of heavy weapons and strategic high 
ground; .and their lack of any coherent 
Response aS suggest a crisis, although one 
yiat may still be overcome or at least 
quickly contained. . 

“AH iheindicatlGnsarcof some disarray - 
and a serious Tnoral e- pr oblem, " a U.SL 
mffitary inriysf smi “The^o^omn Serbs • 
have never seemed so politically, economi- 
cally. psydtolbgjcally and mHixarily vul- 
nerable" - . 

The signs of this vulnerabili ty have mul- 
tiplied recently. On all the fronts where 
they have lost ground over the^past week 
— Bibac in the northwest. Kupres in the 
southwest .and Tmovo southeast of Saraje- 
vo — die Bosnian Serbs have abandoned 
ranifg and artillery as if fleeing in baste. At ' 
least five tanks' appear to have been lost. 

Bosnian Serbian refugees from the gov- 
ernment offensive east of Bibac said the 
soldieraiidminally protecting them turned 
and ran as- soon as - the front line was 
pierced by a commando raid of Muslim 
troops.. ...... 


Recent United Nations visitors to the 
Bosnian Serbian capital in Pale found 
what they described as an atmosphere of 
confusion and nervousness, with ragged 
and unmotivated soldiers increasingly in 
evidence. 

The reasons for sagging morale appear 
clear. For more than two years, a dwin- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


dling number of Bosnian Serbs have been 
defending a very long and largely static 
frontline, which is bleak work at die best 
of tunes. 

Then, three months ago. the Serbian 
president, Slobodan Milosevic, imposed a 
blockade (m his former Serbian allies in 
Bosnia, sharply curtailing crucial fuel sup- 


plies for troop rotation and calling into 
question the basic motivation for the Bos- 
nian Serbian struggle. 

Mr. Milosevic had been angered by the 
refusal of Bosnian Serbian leader, Rado- 
van Karadzic, to accept an international 
peace plan dividing Bosnia roughly in half. 

Mr. Karadzic now vows a total mobili- 
zation for ail-out war. But military ana- 
lysts say they believe that the time for a 
counterattack of any magnitude is limited 
by the imminent onset of winter. 

Most international estimates give the 
Bosnian Serbs about 3S0 tanks against 
about 65 for the Bosnian government 
forces, as well as a comfortable advantage, 
in artillery. But the Bosnian Serbs are* 
overwhelmingly outnumbered by a more 
motivated Muslim-led infantry that has 
now receiv ed basic weaponry' and training. 


NATO Takes to the Air Over Sarajevo j 

ComprW hy Oar Sntj Frctr. PajKudus ing the town since launching an offev *jve i 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herzegovina — last month, forcing Serbs to retreat in i 
Warplanes from the North Atlantic northwest and central Bosnia and taking J 
Treaty Organization buzzed Sarajevo on 250 square kflomeiers (95 square miles) j 
Sunday in a show erf force to halt an of territory in the Bihac pocket alone, j 
escalating battle between Bosnian Army The Muslim assault severely stretched 

and Serbian forces that threatened to Serbian manpower and hampered the 
reignite all-out war in the city. movement of their armor, forcing them 

. Tensions calmed later Sunday, and to yield large amounts of territory, 
there were no further NATO flights. By Sunday, there were increasing signs 

Shelling was reported Sunday near the that the Serbs were beginning to fight 
northwestern town of Bosanska Krupa, bade around Bihac. Witnesses reported 
where the Muslim-led Bosnian Army is that the Serbs had taken high ground at 
trying to dislodge the Bosnian Serbs. Cukovi, about 20 kilometers to the 
Government forces have been attack- southeast (AP, Reuters ) 


Without infantry in sufficient numbers, 
the Bosnian Serbs seem incapable of out- 
right victory or even a major break- 
through. like cutting off the northern town 
of Tuzla by punching through from the 
Vlasenica area to the Ozren heights, most 
analysts say. Quite simply, they do not 
have the men to hold the ground. 

In addition, any Bosnian Serbian move 
against the vulnerable eastern Muslim en- 
claves. against Bihac town or against Sara- 
jevo itself risks a response from the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization because all 
these places were declared “safe zones** by 
the United Nations at a time when the 
Bosnian conflict was not so much war as a 
campaign of Bosnian Serbian terror. 

A crucial factor for the Bosnian Serbs in 
the coming weeks will be the degree to 
which the cooperation between Bosnian 
Croat and Bosnian Muslim forces that 
emerged for the first time in the capture of 
Kupres carries over into other areas. If the 
Croats aac Muslim? continue working to- 
gether. their momentum could be over- 
whelming. military analysts say. 

According to the 1991 census, Kupres 
had a population of 4.S95 Serbs, 3.827 
Croats and 8JJ Muslims, but the sur- 
rounding region was largely Croatian. Cro- 
atian military leaders have in the past 
made it clear 'that they will fight alongside 
the Muslims in areas only with large Cro- 
atian populations. 

This principle probably remains in 
force. Bui the way to the capture of Kupres 
by the Croatian Defense Council the army 
of the Bosnian Croats, was opened by a 
bombardment from Bosnian government 
forces. Thus the Croats have a debt to the 
Muslims. 


White House 
Looks Ahead 
And Fears 2 
Tough Years 

By R. W. Apple Jr. 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House started looking beyond Elec- 
tion Day weeks ago, and President Bill 
Clinton's aides, deeply troubled by 
wtaal they foresee, have been debating 
ever sinoe what their strategy for 1995 
should be. 

“Tuesday will be bad,” one of Mr. 
Clinton’s top advisers said. “We will 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


lose a lot erf ground. Wednesday will 
be almost pleasant. People will wake 

r > the fact that we have done better 
we might have and better than a 
lot of people predicted. At least, we 
hope so. But Thursday will be terrible 
because everyone will begin to realize 
what a really difficult two years lie 
ahead.” 

Of course, even that less-than-san- 
guine view may prove too optimistic. 
The Republicans may well take con- 
trol of one or both houses of Congress, 
rather than simply emerging with 
strongly enhanced minority positions 
in a Senate and a House that are still 
controlled, at least on paper, by the 
Democrats. 

In any event, two possible ap- 
proaches suggest themselves. The 
president can either plow straight 
ahead, pushing once more for compre- 
hensive change s in health care and 
welfare, among other things, knowing 
that he will not succeed but hoping to 
lay the basis for a 1996 campaign 
focused on congressional refusal to 
pass his program. Or he can try lo 
work out a deal with die Republicans. 

By nature, Mr. Clinton is a compro- 
miser — some say too much of a 
compromiser. On the day last summer 
when he finally secured passage of the 
crime bill and simultaneously con- 
cluded that he was unlikely lo get 
anywhere on health care, he told a 
quartet of reporters in the garden off 
the Oval Office that the biggest disap- 
pointment of his term had been his 
failure to develop a spirit of biparti- 
sanship with the Republicans. 

This time, the president could 
choose to announce (or decide with- 
out announcing) that as a result of the 
midterm elections, he intends to re- 
emphasize the centrist New Demo- 
cratic agenda that he ran on in 1992, 
then lost sight of, to some degree, in 
the pitched legislative and political 
battles of 1993 and 1994. 

Senator John B. Breaux of Louisi- 
ana is only one of the moderate Dem- 
ocrats who have been urging Mr. Clin- 

See 1995, Page 4 


Republicans 
Scent Victory 
In Crucial 
Senate Races 

Claiming Momentum, 
Democrats Accuse Foes 
Of ‘Snake Oil’ Politics 

By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON —Republican leaden 
predicted Sunday that their party would 
recapture control of the Senate in Tues- 
day’s pivotal U.S. elections and pursue a 
conservative agenda to revise the way Con- 
gress operates and force lawmakers to bal- 
ance the federal budget. 

Senator Phil Gramm. Republican of 
Texas, who is spearheading his party’s 
drive to take control of the 100-member 
Senate, flatly predicted victory. 

“We’re going to win somewhere between 
7 and 12 seats, depending on how strong 
the tide is,” Mr. Gramm said in a broad- 
cast interview. The Democratic Party cur- 
rently holds a 56-to-44 edge in the Senate, 
and 35 seats are at stake. 

Bob Dole of Kansas, the Republican 
leader in the Senate, was only slightly less 
enthusiastic, predicting in a nationally 
broadcast interview that his party had a 
better-than-even chance of capturing (he 
Senate for the first time since 1 980. He said 
Republicans could come within four or 
five seats of taking over the House, where 
Democrats effectively bold a 257-to-178 
edge. 

White House officials, including Vice 
President A1 Gore and the chief of staff. 
Leon £. Panetta, likened the election year 
to 1948, when President Harry Truman 
defied predictions of a Republican victory. 
Mr. Panetta accused Mr. Gramm of selling 
“snake oil” and “voodoo” to the American 
people and declared: “By no means are we 
going to lose the numbers Phil Gramm is 
predicting.” 

“The momentum.” Mr. Gore said, "is 
with Democratic candidates.” 

Independent analysts suggest that the 
level of voter turnout will make the differ- 
ence in the many dose races for the Senate, 
the House and the governorships. I? turn- 
out is high. Democrats would most like'.;, 
benefit anti a.wid a Republican 
But recent surveys suggest that Republi- 
cans are more motivated this year than 
Democrats to eo to the rolls. 

President Bdl Clinton's persons! iiand- 
mg remains shaky among voters, and a 
majority tell pollsters of a profound un- 
happiness with politics and government. 
Thus, this midterm election wili almost 
certainly do the most damage to the Dem- 
ocrats. who represent the majority of in- 
cumbents. 

Analysts agree that, whatever the out- 

See VOTE, Page 4 


Republicans seem poised to get a Senate 
majority, a final poll shows. Page 3. 


igeS 


1 


ju can 
."said 
tgency 
higan. 
=rs see 
older 
3U.S. 

tg tur- 
mnger 
taver- 
1993, 
rs for 

tional 
Board 
ety of 
us try. 
idude 
5 due 

irline 
n or- 
t that 
reign 
/elers 
lanes 
id in 
e the 


l 


Yeltsin, the Autocratic Compromiser 


V" I By Steven Erlanger 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW. — Russia lost one weak fi- 
nance minist er recently, but. gained anoth- 
er, causing a deputy prime mini ster to 
resign in protest. - 

. But Saturday the government’s stron- 
gest market -minded reformer, Anatoli B. 
Onfoais, was elevated to first deputy 
prime "minister, while the prime minister 
pro mise d to continue a tough fight against 
inflation. . • - 

' Does aif this Kremlin maneuvering mat- 
ter? It does, Of coarse, especially for the 
economy, and for the level of confidence of 
prose who are. thinking about lending or 
Investing in Russia. 

TfeTshiftt also show the nature of poli- 
tics irilhe new Russia, which is nearly as 
autocratic as the old Soviet Union. But the 
job changes last week, including the dis- 


missal of a deputy defense minister after 
accusations of corruption, also show the 
growth of other checks on executive power. 

The latest round of changes began on 
Oct. 1 1 , which has come to be known here 
as “Black Tuesday." Through accident, 
incompetence and profit-taking by banks 
money managers, the ruble lost more 
than 25 percent of its value in a day. 

president Boris N. Yeltsin called for an 
investigation by the Russian national secu- 
rity council, which reports to him, not 
Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. 

Then, in a style more reminiscent of the 
old Soviet leadership, even before any in- 
vestigation. Mr. Yeltsin dismissed the act- 
ing finance minister. Sergei V. Dubinin, 
and demanded that Parliament also re- 
place the Central Bank chairman. Viktor 
V. Gerashchenko. 

Mr. Gerashchenko, a conservative, was 


to blame; Mr. Dubinin, an economic re- 
former, wasn’t. But the dismissals were a 
sign of Mr. Yeltsin’s efforts to keep a 
balance between conservatives and re- 
formers. 

So. before a confidence vote, which the 
government narrowly survived, Mr. Yelt- 
sin appointed a Communist as agriculture 
minis ter to replace a liberal. 

Mr. Yeltsin tried to do the same last 
week, nominating a tough technician at the 
Central Bank, Tatyana Paramonova, to 

replace Mr. Gerashchenko, and naming 
Vladimir G. Panskov, a Soviet-trained 
economist who once worked with the Par- 
liament’s budget committee, to take over 
from Mr. Dubinin. 

But the Russian president did not count 
on the resignation in anger of Alexander 

See RUSSIA, Page 4 


Kiosk 


Paris Title Lifts 
Agassi to No. 2 

7. PARIS -rr/ Andre Agassi of the 
. . United Statefrclimbed to No. 2 in. the. 
jrorid tennis rankings with, a 6-3, 6-3. 
:7-5; .vict9ty Sunday over Marc 
-Basset of Swfizeriandin the final of 
* v the fans Open. It was Agassi’s fifth 
tidc: «rf tfce year, which he began 
; ranked No. 32. Since early September, 

- hehas, woii the. U.S.. Open and the 
^Vsehha’midfiarisevBits. (Page 17) 


Books - y 


- • -A Newsstand Prices _ — _ 
totfcrro__9.00 FF Luxembourg « L- Fr 

W!lfes»w-HJ0;FF M oroeco..~. ; ..12Dh 

:orrter66nJ40OCFA Qatar 
. isypfi, E.P. 5000 Reunion^]! £01 FF 

i Frojke.i.^OOFF Saudi Arobw^.opR- 

[■ -Gaban~...-96& CFA Senegal - JKO CFA 

|:GreeceL.;.:.j300Dr. Spain -2D0PTAS 

Tunisia --p 1 *® 

♦ IwryCaoUfHflCFA Turkey ..T.L^35,ooo 
JD -UA.e. ..~.&50 pirh 
■. lebrmq rV.. IlCC 1 U.5- Ml). < EUT-J SI . »0 ( 


South Koreans of 2Minds 

On U.S. Deal With North 


Andrew Pollack 

York Times Service 

Let Jong Sik escaped from 
45 years ago with her two 
saving her husband and two 
ad. Now, a new agreement 
mg North Korea’s suspected 
ins program promises to ease 
e Korean Peninsula, offering 
led families- But Mis. Lee is 

mi it. , _ .. 

m’t trust those people, said 
referring to the North Kore- 
t. As for the chance of being 
her family, she said, “It will 
ossible to meet them before 1 

after the United State and 
signed an agreement in Ge- 
orea is having trouble com- 
ih an accord that could force 
r»w it deals with its longtime 

-for North Korea’s gtyiifc up 
ams that could enable u to 
the United States will 


relax trade restrictions and begin moving 
toward diplomatic recognition. The Unit- 
ed States will also see that North Korea 
gets modern nuclear power plants and fuel 
oil, bolstering its tottering economy. 

Such moves are putting pressure on 
South Korea to follow the American lead 
and expand business and diplomatic rela- 
tionships with the North. The government 
here is considering relaxing rules that in- 
hibit South Korean companies from doing 
business in the North. 

“We are moving from a containment 
policy to an engagement policy,” said Park 
Jin. press secretary for international affairs 
to the South Korean president, Kim 
Young Sa m . 

But a angle treaty cannot erase four 
decades of hostility overnight. South Ko- 
rea remains deeply distrustful of North 
Korea’s intentions, and there is resistance 
within the government to letting down the 
_ miorri fn a Mist, flrmff mesrh in t he 



iTallUlKW * ww — 1 

a conservative legislator and framer prime 
See KOREA, Page 4 



With one historic punch, Geoige Foreman, 45, regained the heavyweight title he lost 20 years ago to Mohammad AIL 


Foreman Strikes a Blow for Middle Age 

By William Gildea Joe Walcott’s reign at the age of 37 in 

Washington Post Servkr 1951 — and the oldest to win a title in 

LAS VEGAS — Maybe only George any weight dass. 

Foreman himself really believed what be Like a thunderclap, a bolt from the 
said. Foreman predicted — again and desert night, Foreman caught the cham- 
again — that, at the unheard of boxing trion — 19 yearn his junior —with a right 
age of 45, be could become heavyweight hand. It seemed at first like a desperate 
boxing champion of the world once last stand. But it turned out to be one of 
more, 20 years after he lost the title to the most glorious and improbable mo- 
Muhammad Ali in Zaire. meats in sports. A crowd of 12,127 that 

What's more, who could possibly have had hoped, even prayed for the under- 
believed in Foreman as he fell behind dot erupted with a wave of joy. 

Michael Moorer, the champion, on all That right hand was the beginning of 
three judges’ scorecards through nine the end of Moorer 1 s short reign and the 
rounds in the MGM Grand Garden? crowning achievement for Foreman — 

Niue more minutes and Foreman would (he hamburger and muffler salesman on 
be history. television, actor, ringside commentator. 

Instead, he made history on Saturday Houston preacher and father of four 
night, becoming the oldest world heavy- sons, all named George, 
weight champion — surpassing Jersey It was a triumph, as he said, for the 


middle-aged and for senior citizens, as 
well With a left jab followed by a mar- 
velous straight right, Foreman knocked 
out Moorer at 2:03 of the 10th round, 
handing him his first loss in 36 profes- 
sional fights. 

“This was for all my buddies in the 
nursing home and all the guys in the 
jail,” said Foreman, who claimed the 
World Boxing Association and Interna- 
tional Boxing Federation titles. “Always 
remember that song, when you wish 
upon a star it doesn't matter who you 
are, anything your heart desires can 
come true for you. Don't give up on your 
dreams." 

He could have given up. The left- 
handed Moorer, the much quicker fighl- 

See CHAMP, Page 4 




rage 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


- 1 


NATO Inching Toivard East 

U.S. Draws Up Guidelines, but No Deadlines 


By Daniel Williams 
and R* Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Post Seme* 

Washington — The 

United States is for the first 
time drawing up some mini- 
mum requirements for Eastern 
European countries to join the 
Norm Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation, but Washington is still 
delaying key decisions on when 
the alliance would bring anyone 
in, and who it would be. 

While Poland, the Czech Re- 
public. Hungary and others are 
pressing hard to enter, the Clin- 
ton administration and its Eu- 
ropean allies worry that rapid 
NATO expansion would upset 
Russia. 

Suspicious that the alliance’s 
goal is to isolate it, Moscow 
opposes any eastward extension 
of NATO security guarantees. 

President Bill Clinton and his 
national security adviser, W. 
Anthony Lake, are nonetheless 
said by senior officials and dip- 
lomats to favor moving more 
rapidly toward that goal as a 
way of damping European fears 
that a more nationalist Russia 
could pose a new security 
threat 

The new U.S. proposal, being 
readied for a NATO foreign 
mini sters' meeting in Decem- 
ber, represents a compromise 
between providing no further 
guidance to the Eastern Euro- 
pean countries and providing 
clear criteria. 

The one-aze-fits-all formula 
is designed to give hope to eager 
NATO candidates, yet still pla- 
cate Moscow by continuing to 
defer the political decision to 
admit someone. 

The administration has de- 
picted its new guidance as “pre- 
cepts.” An American official 
said the requirements included 
continued commitment to de- 
mocracy, assured civilian con- 
trol of the military and a readi- 
ness to contribute to the 
country's defense. 

As described by U.S. offi- 
cials. the precepts are rules 
meant to provide more concrete 
gui deposts to NATO member- 
ship but, pointedly, do not 
guarantee it. 


“Don’t make too big a deal of 
what we’re up to,” a senior 
American official cautioned. 
“The near-term goal is to get 
the alliance to agree to begin a 
formal process, aimed at defin- 
ing what it will take to expand. 
The potential new partners 
have to know what they must 
bring to the table.” 

Mr. Lake ordered the pre- 
cepts developed because he and 
Mr. Clinton want at least to 
give the appearance that there is 
movement toward expansion, 
U.S. officials said. 

Administration officials are 
sensitive to criticism that they 
are missing a historic moment 
to bind Eastern Europe to the 
West and to help redress aban- 
donment of the region to Soviet 
rule after World War II. 

Some U.S. government ana- 
lysts have also forecast that 
Russia could turn more bellig- 
erent if there are nationalist 
gains in elections in late 1995 
and 1996. 

Critics, among them former 
Secretary of State Henry A. 
Kissinger, assert that the most 
promising Eastern European 


democracies — Poland, the 
Czech Republic, Hungary and 
perhaps the Slovak Republic — 
ought to be let into NATO for 
immediate protection. 

But Germany and France, in 
particular, are hesitant to pro- 
voke an even greater right-wing 
upsurge in Russia, and also 
worry that letting some of these 
countries into NATO while 
leaving othos outside it will 
forge a new political line of de- 
marcation between East and 
Wes* 

They prefer to see Central 
European military integration 
with NATO as an afterthought 
to its economic integration with 
the European Union. 

Besides the Moscow factor, 
the go-slow approach reflects 
an unwillingness of Washing- 
ton and its allies to take on new 
security commitments or pro- 
vide significant funding for ex- 
pansion. 

Germany, despite occasional 
calls from top officials for ex- 
pansion, is eager for neither a 
timetable nor criteria to be laid 
down. France is also not teen 
for NATO expansion. 



_ Mmutno Crpodnoo/Apscc Fnacr-PraK 

PAPAL GREETING — Pope John Paid II acknowledging a crowd Sunday from the 
bishop’s residence in SSraasa, where he dedicated a shrine. The Pope has used his 
three-day trip to Sicfly to speak against violence and to encourage anti-Mafia sentiment 


Kohl’s Opposition Plots to Crack Majority 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 

BONN — In Germany’s 
complex political landscape, 
elections rarely settle anything 
for long. 

The main result of the na- 
tional vote on Oct. 16 was a war 
of nerves. Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl's opposition hopes that it 
will snap the brittle coalition 
between Mr. Kohl’s Christian 
Democratic alliance and For- 
eign Minister Klaus Kinkel’s 
Free Democrats well before the 
end of the legislative term four 
years from now. 

“We can crack ibis major- 
ity,” said Oskar Fischer, a lead- 
er of the opposition Greens. But 
he and Rudolf Scharping, the 
Social Democrat who would 
probably become chancellor if 


the coalition fell apart, expect it 
to take a while. 

The election narrowed Mr. 
Kohl's majority in Parliament 
to only 10 seats, 341 to 33 1, and 
left Mr. Kinkel’s party search- 
ing for a new identity in the 
midst of negotiations with its 
partners for a new government 
legislative program. 


The Free Democrats won 47 venes in mid-November and 
seats last month, down from the elects the chancellor. He needs 
79 they had held since 1990. But half the 672 votes phis one to 
Mr. Kinkd considered even win on the first ballot, but could 
that result a victory of sorts eventually win with a simple 
after the party was shut out in plurality. No chancellor sinr* 
seven state elections this year. World War H has ever b»<t to 
Hzs biggest party rival, for- squeak past in that way before. 

mcr Economics Minister Jurgen . ^ 

Mftll cmann , who blamed Mr. 


World War H has ever bad to 
squeak past in that way before. 

But there is another question: 


legislative program. M&Uemann, who blamed Mr. wrTY 1 

The Free Democrats, assod- KiniSforthe losing streak, was 
a ted with small business, want- forced after the election to re- f W0v 1 9 tes 

ed Mr. Kohl to agree to cut- sign as head of the party’s state « 

taxes and spending, rethink ex- organization in North Rhine- °* 

pensive welfare benefits, and to Westphalia. ordmaiy voters and the Greens 

put them in charge of a national With the Free Democrats in sh °?ZL5f ve 

program on research and tech- turmofl. sane of Mr. Kohl’s ij? 1 3 f^fl t t7"J? cen “ s 5r? - 
notogy. So far, they have been supporters worried that his 10- 


put them in charge of a national 
program on research and tech- 
nology. So far, they have been 
unable to get their partners 
even to agree on a cutoff date 
for a 7.5 percent tax surcharge 
that takes effect Jan. t to pay 
for the extra costs of unifica- 
tion. 


been if seats had been distribut- 
ed in strict accordance with the 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 


US$1 6,000,000 


cuuuviiui v» Uiiitu uicu. ma lir r , - ,, , . 

vote majority could easily P"*o«xm of the total won by 
crumble if Mr. MaTl emarm or eac “ P 81 ^* 
other disgruntled coalition leg- German voters cast two bal- 
islators decided to take a walk, lots apiece, one for a party and 
or even to vote against him, one for a candidate m pp r ft 
when the new Parliament con- toral district. 


Book Says Diana Foresees 
Remarriage and Children 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Diana, Princess of Wales, is reluctant to initiate 
divorce proceedings against Prince Charles but hopes one day to 
remarry and have more children. The Sunday Times reported as it 
published extracts from a new book. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Anti-Apartheid Church figure Slam * 

PRETORIA (AP) -—An outspoken reformer who led the white 
Afrikaners’ church away from apartheid and condemned racist 
policies has been shot and killed, the police said, 

Johan Heyns, former head of the Dutch Reformed Church, died 
Saturday ni ght when an unknown attacker fired a single rifleshot 
through a window of his home and hit him in the back of the head. 
Mr. Heyns, 66, had been playing cards with his wife and grand- 
children, the police said. No one else was injured. 

Mr. Heyns’s church is the church of most Afrikaners, the 
descendants of Dutch settlers, and until the 1 980s gave theological 
justification for the Afrikaner-led state's racial polities. 

Israelis Reopen Shrine in Hebron 

HEBRON, Israeh-Occnpied West Bank (Aft — IsraePs cabinet 
unanimously decided to reopen the Tomb ot the Patriarchs on 
Monday, en ding nine months of closure imposed after a Jewish 
settler shot and killed 29 Muslim worshipers there in February. 

Both Palestinians and Jewish settlers criticized on Sunday the 
new arrangonents by Israel's government, which assigns separate 
prayer areas at the holy site to Muslims and Jews for most of the 
year. 

Hebron’s mayor, Mustafa Nalche, who visited the shrine, said 
that tensions remained high and that the “opening of the mosque 
will not solve the problem of violence.” He said the Israeli plan for 
operating separate prayer halls at the. site was an attempt to 
establish a permanent Jewish presence. 

Iran Scuds Hit Rebel Camp in Iraq 

r BAGHDAD (Renters) — Iran fired at least three Scud missiles 

u* o c,mA«o across the border into Iraq on Sunday, striking a base used by 

® exiled Mujahidin Khalq guerrillas. A Mujahidin spokesman said 

me. The Popejias used his buildings were damaged but no one was hurt, 

wrage anti-Mafia sentiment. “Iraq reserves its full right of legitimate defense in the face of 

unjust Iranian aggression at the appropriate time and through 
suitable means,” a Foreign Ministry spokesman said. 4. 

The guerrilla camp at Asbraf is the main military base of the^ 
IJyii/J Mujahidin Khalq, who lost out to Muslim fundamentalists in 
A l/tlUC/ lllim Tehran street battles after the fall of the shah. The group later 

formed a small army under Baghdad's protection- 

Neo-Nazis, Election Violence Kills 4 in Sri Lanka 

ci • 1 COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (Aft — A shoot-out between rival 

Vjf Jf I political groups and a bomb explosion at an election rally killed at 

mnflf LTUMJUUi least four people as campaigning for Sri Lanka’s presidential 

election aided Sunday. 

IL. Violence has plagued the monthlong campaign for the vote 

At Mr kDLLtLl M Llt (/ Wednesday. The opposition party's presidential candidate, Ga- 
“ mini Dissanayake^ was assassinated Oct 24, and rival groupshave 

7 t* Associated Pros repeatedly dashed over the past month. 

One person was killed and 15 woe wounded Sunday when a 

r _ _ 0i y V , P?" bomb exploded at an opposition United National Party meeting 

at PannaJa village in central Sri Lanka. The assailants were not 
identified. On Sprig, a shooMff bew^ supporters of fe 
mghere, thepolice SS governing People’s AlW mdJJnited National Rng iffled 
The pohreSiid the raid three P C0 P le * m Kegalle, 65 kilometers (40 miles) east of Colombo. 

carried ant at a restaurant Sat- t* |L A 

nrday, after the authorities *“C rlCCOrU 

found out that radical rightists Bernard Tapie, a leftist French poEtirim, turned down ideas 
from Baden-Wttrttembog, Ba- Sunday to run in die presidential election next year, and called for 
varia, Saarland and Rhineland support for a broad-based candidate of the left. He said that for 
Pa lat i n a t e states woe meeting him to run would be a f ailure for his recently renamed Radical 
to found a new neo-Nazi agar party. (AFP) 

nizatian. 

A Baden-Wflrttembexg po- ■— 11 ■ ■ ■ " ■■ 

lice statement said dial a 47- rpT> A1TJTT TTDT1 A TTT 

year-old man, the main oiganiz- -IXiAV JiL Ul 

cr of the meeting, stabbed a ' " — “ — 

being arrested. Italy Bans Raw Seafood Consumption 

Others then began throwing ROME (Reuters) — Health Minister Raffaele Costa ordered sj 


The Associated Press 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


being arrested. ewas Italy Bans Raw Seafood Consumption 

Others then began throwing ROME (Reuters) — Health Minister Raffaele Costa ordered A 

beer bottles and glasses, injur- 10-day ban as of Monday on the consumption of raw seafood 
ing eight policemen, who were after a cholera outbreak in southern Italy, 
cut on faces and hands, the Ten cases of cholera have been confirmed in the southeastern 


cut on faces and hands, the Ten cases of cholera have been confirmed in the southeastern 
statement said. region of Puglia, on Italy's heel. The. virus has also been discov- 

The police arrested 197 pro- ered in seafood in northern Italy. - . 

pie, some of them women and “Consdering the cases of cholera in P uglia and the traces of the 


Luuaucu iiuu. aucw uwil. pie, some of them women and “Consdering the cases of cholera in P uglia and the traces of the 

of culti.fi* from a superset in 



New Life,” writes that the princess is still battling the eating 
disorder bulimia nervosa and has an obsessional interest in 
astrologers and clairvoyants. 

The first installment of extracts from the book, which will be 
published Tuesday, do not detail all these points, but touch on her 
concerns for her young sons since Diana and Charles separated 
two years ago and on her indecision about where she will live. 

Mr. Morton says some people “in her circle” feel that Diana 
still loves Charles, “believing that if he ate enough humble pie. 


Sunday. Two leaders remain in Piedmont, I fed it is my duty to forbid the consumption of all raw 
investigative custody, the police fish,” Mr. Costa said in a statement. 

.. . .. Torrential rains In Egypt have damaged several of the most 

Neo-Nazi literature and em- important Pharaonic tombs in the Valley erf the King s in the 
blems bearing the swastika were southern province erf Luxor, said Mahmud Nureddin, head erf the 
confiscated, they added. Organization erf Egyptian Antiquities. (AFP) 

■ French Synagogue Is Hit The Eiffel Tower reopened Saturday after bang shut for 32 
Unidentified attackers ran- hours by a strike of Paris employees demanding extra staff. (AFP) 


praised her achievements and apologized for his adulteiy, she sacked a synagogue in a Paris Thie W ^ lrV finK<l<nn> 
would take him back.” suburb, daubing the initials of WeeK SHOUflayS 


He quoted an unnamed friend who asked her that question, 
saying Diana replied, “ T would be absolutely shaken and would 
forgive him. 1 ” 

Mr. Morton also says that Diana sees herself marrying a 
foreigner and that France appears repeatedly in her astrological 
prophecies as a future home and the birthplace of “the new man in 


Mr. Morton’s earlier book, “Diana: Hex True Stay” in 1992, 
reporting the marriage breakdown and Diana’s bulimia, quoted 


Algeria’s outlawed Muslim fun- Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
damentalist movement, FIS. on curtailed in the following countries and their dependencies this 
the walls, Reuters reported week because of national and religious holidays; 

Sunday from Paris. MONDAY: Bangladesh. Colombia, Russia, Tunisia. 

The spokesman for the Jew- TUESDAY: Russia. 

Got esse told French radio that IHUKbDAY: P anama , 

several rooms had been ran- 


friends who are widely believed to have spoken with Diana’s sacked during the night but that Rko. Tahiti. United States. 


FRIDAY: Angola. Belgium, Bhutan, Canada, Fiance. Monaco, Poland. Puerto 


approval. 


nothing had been stolen. 


SATURDAY: Bhutan, Taiwan. Sources 1 : J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


Italy, With 32 Deaths, Takes Brunt of Mediterranean Storms 


USS 138.000 paid out at each 
draw. US$ 16 Million won so 
far. In the world-famous Abu 
Dhabi Duty Free raffle. Each 
ticket priced at US$133. Just 
1 : 200 tickets entered In each 
draw. Approximately 6 draws 
every month. Available 
exclusively to passengers 
traveiiina or tran.sitina throuah 


Abu Dhabi Airport. Notification 
immediately by phone and by 
mail. Money paid in cash, by 
banker's cheque or directly 
into the winner's bank account. 
USSl 6.000.000 hard cash. 
The easy way. 


nee Abu Dhabi 
= Airport Duty Free 


The way the world's going 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service ■- 

ROME — The rains came 
and the riverbanks broke and 
by Sunday night northern Italy 
had counted at Least 32 dead 
and more people missing in the 
fastest-rising floods in 8 1 years, 
caused by freak rain that pum- 
meled southern Europe and 
North Africa with a deadly, 
sodden fist 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 
For Yfytk, Lite and Academic Experience 
TTraigti Convenient Home Study 

(310) 471-0306 EXT. 23 
Fax: (310) 471-6456 
tSgcifp Fax Of and delated resune for 
EHmyamaiiBH 

Pacific Western University 
600 N. Sepulveda BW.. Dept 23 
Los Angeles. CA 90049 


The wont was in the north- 
western Italian region of Pied- 
mont around the automating 
city of Turin, where the torrents 
flowed unchecked through 
homes and across fields, bring- 
ing down the telephone and 
power lines, severing highways 
and buckling bridges. 

The Po River burst its banks. 
So did the Tanaro River. Italian 
television said the death toll 
could rise to 100. 

After a three-storied bouse 
collapsed under a mudslide in 


p ask the butler... 


the town of San Raffaele Ci- 
mena, near Turin, rescuers 
pulled a 4-moath-oId baby girl 
from the wreckage, where the 
child had been sheltered for five 
hours by die dead body of her 
29-year-old mother. 

The church of a nearby con- 
vent also collapsed, sending 26 
nuns fleeing for safety. “It was a 
terrible sight,” an unidentified 
sister told tbe Italian news 
agency ANSA. “The ground we 
walked on had been washed 
away.” 




N-C-A- P-O- R. F 


. Wk*r* lirf«l it ujiih| jr, ■<(( ir it it. 


Tbe tally of dead in north- 
western Italy was part of a grim 
weekend in mainland southern 
France, the island of Corsica, 
Spam and Morocco, where 15 
people were reported Sunday to 
have died in several days of 
flooding. 

In France, the Var River 
turned into a torrent sweeping 
through the Riviera town of 
Nice. When it hit the airport, it 
poured through underground 
car parks, jumbling parked au- 
tos on top of each other, and 
flooded the runways. The air- 
port was declared closed until 
Tuesday. 

In the southern French re- 
gion of Lozfere, mudslides bad 
left many villages isolated. The 
official death toll in France was 
said to number five. 

In Italy, the floods washed 
cars from bridges, spilled m od- 


dity ova farmland and left a 
swath of destruction. 

It was the speed of the calam- 
ity that took people by surprise. 
Local officials said 61 centime- 
ters (24 inches) of rain fell in 
two-and-a-half days in parts of 
Piedmont, leaving parts of one 
town, Asti, 50 kilometers (30 
miles) southeast of Turin, under 
2.75 meters (9 feet) of water. 

Mamizio Gasparri, a senior 
Interior Ministry official, said 
the downpours were the worst 
to hit Piedmont since 1913. 

Elsewhere in Italy, casc ading 
rain in Liguria touched off 
mudslides and floods that, in 
the port of Genoa, left hospital 
corridors awash with dirty wa- 
ter. Heavy rains were reported, 
too, in the Val d’Aosta to the 
north and in Naples and Sicily 
to the south. 


Encourage 
Talks Between 
Countries 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone® number of the country you're calling from. 


Antigua 

(Available from public card 
Argentina* 

AuetrttfCO* 

Bahamas 

Bahrain 

BeighontCQ* 

Bermuda* 

Bolivia* 

BiszR 
Cenadixca 
Cayman Mends 
ChtoccJ 
Colombia CO* 

Costa Rica* 

Cyprus* 

Czech RepubHaCO 


phones only.) « 
001-600433-1111 
022-903-012 
1-800-62 4-1000 
800-002 
080010012 
1-8006200484 
06002222 
000-8012 
1-8Q0880800Q 
1-800624-1000 
00V-Q316 
980100001 
162 
08090000 
0042-000112 


Danmarfcica* 
Dominican Reptdrflc 
Ecuador* 

Egypttco* 

(Outside of Cairo, dial 

SSalvBdor* 

FWanckCC* 

France* CO* 

Gambia* 

GarmenytCQ 
(Limited availability in 
Greeeetco* 

Grun*da+ 

Quatamala* 

HaJtfcco-f 

Honduras* 

Hungary* GO* 


8001-0023 

1-800751-6824 

170 

02 first.1 355- 5770 

195 

9800102-80 
19T-OO10 
001-99 
013M012 
eastern Germany.) 

008001211 

1-800624-8721 

189 

001-800444-1234 
00 1-80067 4-7 QOQ 
OCr -80001 411 


899-002 
(Special Phones Only) 
Irefandfca 1-80055-1001 

braeACCl 177-1502727 

Italyi CO* 172-1022 

Jamaica 800674-7000 

Kenya 

(Available from most major dtfesj 08001 1 
Kuwait 800MCK800624) 

Lebanon! CCl 600824 

(Outside of Beirut, dial 01 first.) 425-036+ 


t i eehtansirin(CO» 

Luxembourg 

Maxim* 

Monaco! CO* . 
HtthortMtiBCO* 
Netherlands AntaeatfCH- 


1550222 

08000112 

80-800-674-7000 

19V-00-19 

0602241-22 

001-800950-1022 


NtearaguatcCt 

(Outside of Managua, dial 02 lirsU 
NorwayiCQ* 

Panama 
Miliary Bases 
Psrefitunr* 

Pern (Outside Of Lime, dial 190 first) 
PMemhcci Ot-oi 

PortupalTCC! i 


Puerto RkoiCO 
Qatoncthr 
Romantocm 
RussbKCCH- 
San MarinoiCC?* 
Saudi Arabia 
Slovak RepubficKXl 
South AfriceiCO 


first.) 166 

800-19912 

108 

2810-108 
008-11-800 
first) 001-190 

Ot-OI -04-800-222 
05-017-1234 


1-800-888-8000 
0800-012-77 
01-800-1800 
8*10-680-497-7222 
172-1022 
1-800-11 
00-42-0001 12 
0800-99-001 J 


SpalniCO 

SwadamCQ* 

SwitzerJandtcn* 

Syria! CC) 

Trinidad* Tobago 

Turkey* 

lAnUna-f- 

United Anb Emirates 
United HngdanucC) 

To cell the U.S. using BT 


900-99-0014 

020-795422 

IK-0222 

0800 

(Special Phones Only) 
004001-1177 
8*10-013 
800-111 

0800434222t 


TV ■■ .v . 7 - . 

To call the UB. using MERCURY 05004ME22t 
To call anywhere other 
than the U.S. 0600400-800 

Uruguay (Collect not available.) 000-412 

l 5 *"*" 00 1-8004884000 

^°? I Ca 17MQ22 

Venezuela** 800-11144 




tise your MCI Cord.* local telephone card or cat collect ^a0 at the same low rates. 

-.* ££: ■ (CO Country- to-country calDng available. May not be available loffrom all international locations. Certain 

T restrictions apply. * Limited ttva i la bUky . ▼ Wait for second dial tone. A Available ftom LADATEL public 
phones only. depends on cad origin in Mexico, t International cornmuntertiona carrier. * Not 
VWMVWWVW available from public pay phones. • Public phones may require deposit of coin or phone card for dial lone. 


Wommm 

J From Mi 


Let It Take You Around The World 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 ruedei'Evtutgik. 75018 Paris. 





,#L » v • w 1 tr» . ... 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 3 


ublicans Could Eke Out Senate Takeover 


"< ‘"‘Am’-" 


‘^Ot, 


“t'Jfcj- 

i * *> .(U 1 

SC -ili 

■? a e^V 




d : David S. Broder 

■ - Washb tgt™ .Pair Service 

WASBINGTON — Repub- 
licans go into the election Tues- 
day, with. dear prospects of 
pjfkmg tg> enough seats to give 
®&n.fheir first Senate majority 
nrei&bi years and with almost 
as good a chance of taking over 
the Ho me o f Representatives 
for the "first- time since 1954 
according to a final 50-state 
survey by The Washington 
Post. • 

Assummg that toss-up races 
dmdeervemy between the par- 


ties. Republicans would have a 
51-to-49 advantage in the new 
Senate, a gain of seven seats. A 
similar allocation of House 
seats too dose to call would give 
the Republicans 214, four short 
of a majority but a 36- seat gain 

Late interviews with party of- 
fici al s , pollsters, campaign con- 
sultants and neutral observers 
jU all SO states suggest dearly 
that the voters’ impatience with 
incumbents and the low ap- 
proval ratings for President Bill 
Clinton and many of his con- 
gressional allies may tilt the 


• 4 -s*. 


1 * .1 ^ 

. L " 


? 3v? 






dose races — like Virginia's 
toss-up contest between Sena- 
tor Charles S. Robb, a Demo- 
crat, and Oliver L. North, a Re- 
'ublican, — toward the 
jublicans. 

If Republicans were to win 
three-fourths of the toss-ups, 
for example, the Republican 
Senate majority might swell to 
54_to 46 and Republicans might 
gain a 225-lo-2l0 majority in 
the House. 

A major caveat: With many 
of the closest contests in states 
and districts where no incum- 


bent is on the ballot, and with 
some late polls showing one- 
fifth of the voters hedging their 
choices, forecasts may be worth 
even less.than usual this year. 

Democrats hope that with 
Mr. Clinton and Vice President 
Ai Gore campaigning for candi- 
dates in critical slates; with the 
recent economic news upbeat; 
and with approval for Mr. Clin- 
ton's foreign policy higher than 
it has been, the scale of their 
losses may be trimmed. 

From Mr. Clinton on down, 
almost every Democrat has 


Q&A: ‘Cynicism Industry 9 and the Voters 


Fiercely contested elections for Con- 
gress, where the Democratic Party controls 
both houses, take place Tuesday. The im- 
pact on President Bill Clinton could be 
profound Thomas R Mann, director of 
governmental studies for the Brookings 
Institution in Washington, surveyed the 
political landscape with Paul F. Horvitz of 
the International Herald Tribune. 


A 




■'rilaul 


if. 


‘“CS 


Q* What is the mood of the American 
votes? 

. A. The mood is as sour as I have ever 
seen. it. People are unbelievably cynical, 
skeptical and grumpy, if not intensely 
angry. Some of this reflects objective 
economic conditions whereby a rather 
robust' recovery and the appearance of 
four and a half million new jobs has not 
been accompanied by real wage gains by 
a lot of Americans. Those with a hi gh 
school education or less have seen their 
real wages decline by 20 percent over the 
last 12 years or so. 

That’s the backdrop. But the more 
important factor here is, frankly, that 
there is a cynicism industry in America. 
Modem campaigns are intensely nega- 
tive about personal character. The strate- 
gies pursued by incumbent members of 
Congress and by the Republican Party, 
to so diminish the institution of Congress 
to advance their own personal interest, 
and the increasing ly contenytuomt, cyn- 
ical coverage of national political institu- 
tions and elected officials by the mass 
media, have all created what I think is a 
somewhat contrived and artificial public 
anger. The reality is that people are a lot 
happier with tbexr private personal cir- 


cumstances than they are with the soci- 
ety as a whole or the government. 

These attitudes have an impact They 
delegitunize government They make the 
public less willing to differentiate, to 
hold accountable individuals for their 
actions and more inclined to buy into 
simple solutions and vent their anger 
rather than to apply their energies to trv 
to improve the situation. 

We are caught in a cycle here where 
politicians tell people what they want to 
hear and people lash out at politicians. 

Q. Why are these U.S. arid-term elec- 
tions significant? 

A Midterm elections invariably weak- 
en new presidents. One of the eternal 
verities of American politics is that the 
president’s party loses congressional 
seats midterm. What’s unusual about 
1994 is the possibility of the president 
losing formal control of the Senate and 
possibly even of the House of Represen- 
tatives. The Republicans have been in 
the minority in die House for 40 years, so 
for them to catapult into the majority or 
dose to it after Clinton has been in office 
only two years would be a political event 
of major importance. 

Q. Are the elections a referendum on 
Congress as an institution or on the Clin- 
ton presidency or both? 

A. Elections for the House and Senate 
are most importantly a reflection of local 
political party strength, of the personal 
attractiveness of the incumbent and the 
challenger, and of the interest among 
voters m turning out on Election Day. 
But there's also a national dimension. 
They are partly a referendum on the 
president and his performance. To a less- 


er extent, they are a referendum on Con- 
gress as an institution. 

Q. Is there an expectations game being 
played in which the perceived outcome 
will depend on how people judge or as- 
sess the results? 

A There's been a fascinating expecta- 
tions game going on. 

Frankly, I think the underlying struc- 
tural factors, including the growing Re- 
publican strength in the South, the large 
number of open seats, the voters’ more 
general disdain for anything associated 
with professional politicians, will virtual- 
ly guarantee a strong Republican show- 
ing. What we don’t know is whether it 
wifi be strong enough to allow the Re- 
publicans to take formal control of one 
or both houses of Congress or only 
enough to put them in a position to drive 
President Clinton mad. 

Q. Do you subscribe to the notion that 
regardless of the outcome, the new Con- 
gress is likely to be locked in an even 
more intense partisan battle? 

A. Certainly the ingredients for in- 
tense partisanship and ideological polar- 
ization will be there. But whether it de- 
velops depends in part upon the 
strategies pursued by President Clinton. 
There are, after all, some pragmatic if 
not moderate Republicans in both the 
Senate and the House who will be un- 
comfortable with the hard-right opposi- 
tion strategy throughout the two years of 
the next Congress. If the president 
reaches out to them, if he indicates clear- 
ly his desire to govern from the center on 
a bipartisan basis, he may be able to 
defuse some of this partisanship and 
polarization. 



spent much of the last two 
weeks trying to persuade the 
elderly, who turn out in dispro- 
portionate numbers in off-year 
elec lions, that a Republican vic- 
tory will threaten their Social 
Security and Medicare benefits. 
Labor and minorities have been 
mobilizing in the last few weeks 
to prevent a political reversal 
that would leave Mr. Clinton 
hamstrung in the final two 
years of his term. 

Winning the majority of the 
close races would permit the 

Democrats to main fain nnmi- 
nal control in the 104th Con- 
gress. But that Congress is 
clearly going to be more conser- 
vative than the last one, which 
in its final months blocked or 
weakened many of Mr. Clin- 
ton’s m^jor domestic initiatives. 

Candidates campaigning for 
lower taxes and smaller govern- 
ment are doing well, even in 
libera] states like Maryland and 
Washington. 

Democratic operatives in 
New Jersey. Michigan, Texas 
and Washington, among other 
places, report that they see 
more Republican lawn signs 
than usual and more door-to- 
door canvassing by Republican 
volunteers. The difference in 
enthusiasm between the parties 
is even more pronounced in the 
South and in the Rockies and 
Southwest, where anti -Clinton 
sentiment is strongest. 

In addition, there is dear evi- 
dence that nominally nonparti- 
san groups, especially the 
Christian Coalition and the Na- 
tional Rifle Association, allied 
with conservative candidates 
and mobilized by the political 
and legislative setbacks of the 
last two years, are likely to be a 
more powerful force in this 
election than ever before. 

Representative Mike Synar. 
Democrat of Oklahoma, who 
was defeated in a primary upset 
after being targeted by term- 
limits supporters and conserva- 
tive Christian groups, said he 
has warned Democratic col- 
leagues to “expect a 4 or 5 per- 
cent worse vote than your polls 
show" in districts where these 
organizations are active. 



Newt Gingrich, right, with Tom Brokaw of NBC-TV, in Roswell, Georgia. Mr. Gingrich 
win very fikdy be speaker of die House if Republicans take control ami he is re-elected. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Reagan Suffering From Alzheimer’s Disease 


By AT Karnes. 

WcaMngum Past Soria 

WASHINGTON — Former 
President Ronald Reagan, in a 
letter to the; American people, 
has announced that his doctors 
have told him he is suffering 
from the early stages of Alz- 
heimer's disease; an incurable 
brain disorder. 

An accompanying statement 
by five of his doctors said the 
disease was detected during 
yearly testing. 

“Over the past 12 months, we 
began to notice from President 
Reagan’s test results symptoms 
indicating the possibility of ear- 
ly stage Alzheimer’s disease,” 
the doctors said. “Additional 
testing and an extensive obser- 
vation over the past weeks have 
led us to conclude that Presi- 
dent Reagan is entering the ear- 
ly stages of this disease.” 

Mr. Reagan’s health, they 
said, was “otherwise good,” but 
“it is expected that as die years 


go on it will begin to deterio- 
rate.” 

Friends had noted that Mr. 
Reagan, 83, was conspicuously 
absent last month at a confer- 
ence at. the Reagan Library in 
California, and he had not ap- 
peared at various events in re- 
cent weeks. Several people who 
saw him in April at the funeral 
of former President Richard 
Nixon said at the time that he 
appeared to be in declining 
health. 

Catherine 3 Busclu^^Mr. Rea- 
gan was at an undisclosed loca- 
tion with his wife. 

Alzheimer’s disease is a pro- 
gressive and irreversible neuro- 
logical disorder. Symptoms in- 
titule memory loss, impairment 
of judgment, disorientation and 
personality change. Mr. Rea- 
gan’s mother, Nette, who died 
at age 77, also apparently suf- 
fered from Alzheimer’s. 

During his presidency, Mr. 


Reagan at times seemed to have 
difficulty talking directly about 
some of his medical ills. In 
1985, after he was operated on 
for colon cancer, he never actu- 
ally said he had the disease, but 
rather that -“I had something 
inside of me that bad cancer in 
it, and it was removed.” 

Two weeks later, an opera- 
tion to remove a basal ceD skin 
cancer from his nose touched 
off a battle with reporters at the 
White House because the ad- 
ministration did not report the 
operation until two days later, 
and did not at first say that it 
involved skin cancer. 


But in his letter Saturday, 
Mr. Reagan said he and his 
wife, Nancy, had decided to re- 
veal the early diagnosis in the 
hopes of promoting a greater 
awareness of the disease. 


“Unfortunately,” he said, “as 
Alzheimer’s disease progresses, 
the family often bears a heavy 
burden. I only wish there was 


some way 1 could spare Nancy 
from tins painful experience. 
When the time comes, I am con- 
fident that with your help she 
wiD face it with faith and cour- 
age." 

“In tiie past. Nancy suffered 
from breast cancer, and 1 had 
my cancer surgeries," he said. 
“We found through open dis- 
closures we were able to raise 
public awareness- We were hap- 
py that as a result many more 
people underwent testing. They 
were treated in early stages and 
able to return to normal, 
heahhy lives.” 

Mr. Reagan said he intended 
to “live the remainder of the 
years God gives me on this 
Earth doing the thing s I have 
always done.” 

“1 will continue to share life’s 
journey with my beloved Nancy 
and my family,” he said. 

He thanked the American 
people for electing him presi- 
dent. 

“When the Lord calls me 


It’s Official: Feinstein Worker Was Illegal 


ii? 


By B. Dnunmond Ayres Jc 

New York Tana Service 

LOS ANGELES — Clearing 
the official record but farther 
muddying' the' political scene, 
tte.UfS. Immig ration and Nat- 
uralization Service has reported 
that a Guatemalan housekeeper 

:■ employed by Senator Dianne 
’ Feinstein in the early 1980s was 

' INSaffidalssaid a^search of 


em plo yment of undocumented 
workers. 

“The person in question 
hyn Horf me documentation,” 
Ms. Feins tein said while cam- 
paigning in Sacramento. “It 
looked verifiable to me, and I 
hired her. She worked for me 
far two years.” 

Ms. Realegeno also insisted 
that she had presented proper 


documentation when she was 
hired to work for Ms. Feinstem, 
then the mayor of San Francis- 
co. 

“I was legal,” said Ms. Reale- 
geno, who since has returned 
legally to the United States and 
now works in another San 
Francisco household. 

Mr. Huffington, politically 
buffeted himself by a disclosure 


that be employed an undocu- 
mented Guatemalan nanny for 
five years, called Ms. Feinstein 
“a liar.” 

Mr. Huffington is a staunch 


supporter of stronger immigra- 
tion controls, which is 


not only 
the current focal point of the 
Feinstem- Huffington race but 
also the hottest issue in Califor- 
nia politics in general this fall. 


home, whenever that may be. 1 
will leave with the greatest love 
for this country of ours and 
eternal optimism for its future," 
he said. “I now begin the jour- 
ney that will lead me into the 
sutiset-of my'Iife. I know that- 
for America’ there will always 
be a bright dawn ahead.” 

Although at nearly 70 he was 
the oldest elected president, Mr. 
Reagan was always projected as 
energetic with "White House 
photographs showing him ac- 
tive az his ranch riding horses or 
chopping wood. 

A former actor who was 
called the Great Communicator 
for his effective use of televi- 
sion. Mr. Reagan used his affa- 
bility and sense of humor to 
deflect concerns during his re- 
election campaign in 1984 that 
he was too old to be president 

“I wifi not make age an issue 
in this campaign,” he said dur- 
ing a debate with a Democratic 
candidate, Walter Mondale. “I 
am not going to exploit for po- 
litical purposes my opponent's 
youth and inexperience” The 
line brought down the house 
and ended the discussion. 

As president Mr. Reagan 
was severely wounded in a 198 1 
assassination attempt A few 
months ^fter his re-election, 
Mr. Reagan had 24 inches (61 
centimeters) of his colon re- 
moved along with a cancerous 
growth. He underwent surgery 
for skin cancer three times. 

In July 1989 he was thrown 
from a horse and required an 
ition to remove a pool of 
from his brain. 


Generation X: Just Wondering 


AUSTIN, Texas — Here in this sunny 
mecca of youth, where body-pierced young 
voters tote Power Books and quote Kurt Co- 
bain and Rush Limbaugh, the generation they 
call X is watching the 1994 elections with a 
bemused and sometimes bitter cynicism. 

Trolling through the coffee houses, com- 
puter bulletin boards and muffler shops of 
Austin offers a glimpse of the young voter, 
who beyond att else is “completely, utterly. 


personally like Senator Charles S. 
ibb, a Democrat, or his Republican chal- 
lenger, Oliver North. By now, most people say 


they are side of both. 


totally" sick of traditional partisan party poli- 
tics, and to whom the red-faced Newt Ging- 


rich, Republican of Georgia, and the portly 
Ted Kennedy, Democrat of Massachusetts, 
have become self-parodying foils in a grid- 
locked world that fails to solve real problems. 

“Even if a lot of young people wouldn’t say 
it out loud, we’re just waiting, we're just 
watching the whole American experiment 
and wondering, ‘Can this go on?' " said Jenni- 
fer Young, 23, an English major at the Uni- 
versity of Texas who helped jump-start the 
formerly defunct Capital City Young Demo- 
crats, only to leave after the “professional 
politicians” took it over. 

The feelings of many young voters in Aus- 
tin are mirrored by national potting by MTV, 
the music network that is ptfhaps the most 
relentless sampler of young thinking and 
trends. “We asked them who’s at fault for the 
gridlock, and the vast majority said the sys- 
tem just seems broken ” said Gwen Lipsky, 
senior vice president for research and plan- 
ning at MTV. which last polled a national 
cross-sampling of 16- to 29-year-olds in early 
September. 

“The young voters really say this party 
stuff is getting in the way." she said. “They're 
tired of the fringes of both parties tearing the 
system apart.” 

Yet, the MTV potting also found that 
young people who identify themselves as reg- 
istered to vote, a figure that has grown from 
58 percent in 1992 to 68 percent in 1994. 
planned to cast a ballot. (William Booth. IVP) 


Torn the West Virginia border to Chesa- 
peake Bay, about the only thing on which 
supporters of both men agree is that it has 
been a long, bilious campaign where the cen- 
tral issue is which man lied the most: Mr. 
North in his dealings with Congress in the 
Iran-Contra affair or Mr. Robb about the 
marital infidelity and drug use he denies. 

The hostilities have spread to the field, 
where there have been reports of mutilated 
campaign posters and bumper-sticker war- 
fare. 

After months of exposure to old headlines 
from Mr, North's Iran-Contra trial, a Playboy 
cover (Mr. North attacking Mr. Robb on 
infidelity), prayerful exhortations from Pat 
Robertson, a new old debate on the Confed- 
erate flag, and the calling of God’s name on 
both sides, Vir ginians are split down the mid- 
dle, their leanings formed by their loathing 
for one man or the other rather than a respect 
for either. (Isabel Wilkersan, NYT) 


Georgia Is on Gingrich’s Mind 


Civil War In the Old Dominion 


WASHINGTON — Mr. Gingrich, the 
House Minority Whip, who has been barn- 
storming the country for the last month on 
behalf of Republican candidates, has abrupt- 
ly canceled the remainder of his appearances 
and returned home to Georgia through Tues- 
day’s election. 

Aides to Mr. Gingrich said the Republican 
wanted to rest and do some last-minute cam- 
paigning in his own race. Democrats contend, 
however, that he has become a liability to 
some Republican congressional candidates 
and that they have discouraged him from 
coming. 

What's more, Ben Jones, the former televi- 
sion actor and Democratic House member 
who is challenging Mr. Gingrich in his subur- 
ban Atlanta district, issued a poll last week 
purporting to show Mr. Gingrich’s once sub- 
stantial lead evaporating to a mere six points. 
The Gingrich campaign disagrees. ( WP ) 


CULPEPER, Virginia — In normal times, 
Vir ginia is a genteel state of horse farms and 
tobacco fields and politics in moderation. Bui 
these are not norma] times. 

In the final days of probably the meanest, 
ugliest race in a mean and ugly election sea- 
son, Virginia feels like a country at war with 
itself, and it has nothing to do with whether 


Quote/ Unquote 


Alina Gawlik of Falls Church, Virginia, 
describing the Senate campaign in her state: 
“This is what it has come to. It's intellectual 
violence. There's so much hatred it scares 
me." (NYT) 


Away From Politics 


• Another world record has been set by 
Princeton University’s experimental fusion 
reactor by generating 10.7 million watts of 
power, considered a crucial step toward de- 
veloping new commercial fusion reactors. The 
one-second burst of. energy — enough to 
momentarily power 2,000 to 3,000 homes — 
was “a major milestone,” said the laboratory 
director, Ronald C. Davidson. 

• A Denver father was given a maximum 96- 


28 states, officials of the U.S. Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta 
reported The agency said laboratory analysis 
had confirmed 489 cases of salmonella linked 
to ice cream products produced by Schwan’s 
Sales Enterprises of Marshall, Minnesota. 


year prison sentence for fatally beating his 8- 
‘ * fis 


year-old sot, Robert, with fists, a wooden 
dub and a lead pipe in 1993. Allen Spencer. 
32, was convicted of second-degree murder 
and child abuse resulting in death. 

• An outbreak of sabnoueUa linked to ice 
cream from Minnesota has spread to at least 


• An onboard instrument broke but astronauts 
aboard the shuttle Atlantis continued their 
study of the Earth’s atmosphere on Sunday. 
The mission is devoted to studying the effects 
of sunlight and pollution on the ozone layer in 
Earth’s stratosphere. The broken instrument, 
the Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Sounder, 
managed to produce 10 hours worth of useful 
data before a power surge destroyed its com- 
puter, scientists said. AP. NYT. Reuters 


«tS5h «" fflns 1994, the Year of On-Line Democracy 

grand-.Gabrera Realegeno, ~ 


grand 

showed that during much, if not 
all, of “the two years that she 
worked for Ms. Feinstein, she 
'held no visa or work permit 
“Our, records indicate that 
&he : was not- legally entitled to 
be in .die United' States back 
then*" said Don Mueller, an 
INS s pokesman. “She bad a 


visa JO work for:*? Guarema- platform for me political uc- 

lan Consulate m San Franasco mi ^ Lte,” and Will Shelled* ,*e 


New Yoek Tuna Service 

The Internet and other spurs 
of the “information superhigh- 
way” have emerged as powerful 
new links between politicians 
and voters in this election year, 
adding forums for debate by the 
candidates, nearly instant vot- 
ing results and vast pools of 


eminent services electronically; 
civic organizations are explor- 
ing ways to provide free or low- 
cost computer access to average 
citizens, not just the technologi- 
cal elite. 

“As more and more people 
cruise the superhighway, the In- 
ternet will become a caudal 


governor of Minnesota. The 
state's five tap candidates for 
governor and the three leading 
candidates for the U.S. Senate 
participated in electronic de- 
bates via electronic matt. 

For Mr. Sbetteriy, who was 
not invited to take part in [de- 
vised debates and wno does not 


latform for toe political de- 


that ran odton Nov. 16, 1980, 
and toe next tiroe she appears in 
oar recces is at July 31, 1983, 
when die smfaccs and leaves 
Ujeemmtty.vtiluntarily.” 

The senator, a Democrat who 
has staked agood part her re- 
deetkw battle with Represen ta- 
tmeMiefcad Huffington on an 
mgwy p. that she never em- 
$tyed m 3Iegal alien, said in 
response to the disclosure that 
she had done nothing wrong. 

. Ms! Realegeno, Ms. Fon- 
atifl fitid r had presented what 
^qu^lobeproperimmigra- 
&b documents at the time she 
**sfcned; And in any event, she 
; said, to&4ftman was hired in 
yearsbefore Congress 
passed a ^ prohibiting the 


rail, state and national 

The idea of electronic democ- 
racy has spread to nearly every 
stale along with the rapid ex- 
pansion of the Internet and a 
variety of on-line information 
services and electronic bulletin 

boards, which are used by more 

than 5 million Americans. 

Mindful of this growing con- 
stituency, technically savvy pol- 
iticians are getting electronic 
mail addresses; cities and states 
are setting up information serv- 
ers and beginning to offer gov- 


Grassroots Party candidate for 


have the money for advertising, 
Internet is a potentially 


the 

great equalizer. 




feaofocrfe* In Germany 
ft»tca£,foAfre«, 

• 0T30MB5S5 




ORLY- LONDON 

from FF. 790 RT* 

4 flights daily 

1 st (light from Orly 7: 1 5 am 



re- 
scheduled Airline 

See your Travel Agent 
or call (Paris): 44 56 1808 
•plus rm 


Near The Champs ElysEes, 
A Real Taste Of Paris 




Paris Tradition Specials* 


Hotel Rckal Monceau 

Sd^ Rwmc FF 1650 per - DobHb Booid: FF 1950 per nyit 

T 7 . zwnne Hodx - Paw - Ftamr 

TeL 133) 1 *5 61 06 9S / Fa (33) 1 42 99 89 90 


Hotel Vernet 

Single Room: FF 1400 per - DooWeRiwcn FF 1550 per ^tr 

25. racVnocx - 75Q0S Paw- Vana 


to 

m 

Groupe Royal Monceau 
- Luxury with die French Touch ’ 




TOLL FREE NUMBER 


France 0591 6000 - Germany 0130 6333 
England 0800 413000 - Switzerland 155 "’344 
Italy 1678 74488 - Austria 0660 6789 . 

Denmark 800 15555 - Sweden 020 797000 
Norway 800 1 1633 - Spain 900 973533 
Netheriand 06022 2010 


Information-, schedules, reservations. Frequent fiuveict Bonus System. 


0 


mmmMm 


THE ROUTE TO SERENITY 


ige 5 


3u can 
"said 
igency 
rhi gan. 
as see 
older 
e U.S. 
ig tur- 
) unger 
taver- 
1993, 
rs for 


tional 

Board 

etyof 

ustry, 

iclude 

s dse 


triin e 
ji or- 
t that 
»reign 
relers 
lanes 
id in 
e the 


- • — 





fage 4 


EVTEKNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


* * 


jx-'. J. - i 


' 




< - ' . • ; 

.. ' ' . 

- 

£,v^V ; \ ^ 



For Mother, World Was Faffing Apart’ 

la Desperation She Thought of Suicide, Then Killed Her 2 Sons 


China Frees 
8 Activists * 


v ' . *Jm ^ 



.•* *je~ > 

s'r* 






AK Jandcji/Rcutcn 

Two Islamic Action Front deputies protesting during the treaty debate in Amman. 


Jordanians Ratify Pact With Israel 


The Associated Press 

AMMAN, Jordan — Parliament ratified 
the peace treaty between Jordan and Israel on 
Sunday despite opposition from Muslim fun- 
damentalists and leftists. The approval clears 
the way for full diplomatic relations. 

The vote in the 80-member Chamber of 
Deputies was 55 to 23 with one abstention. 
One lawmaker did not attend the session. 

The treaty .signed by the prime ministers of 
Jordan and Israel on Oct 26, now goes to the 
40-member Senate, appointed by King Hus- 
sein. The monarch also must sign it into law. 

The vote Sunday came after Prime Minister 


Abdul-Salam Majali told the Chamber of 
Deputies, or lower bouse, that the treaty re- 
stored Jordan’s territorial and water rights 
and paved the way for revitalizing Jordan’s 
economy. 

Mr. Majali also said the accord allowed 
Jordan a central role in regional politics after 
four years of isolation caused by its pro- Iraq 
tilt during the 1990-91 Gulf crisis. 

During the ratification debate, Muslim 
fundamentalist and leftist deputies assailed 


By Barbara Vobqda 

and Gaiy Lee 

Washington Post Service 

.UNION, South Carolina — In the hours 
before her children died, Susan Smith 
drove along the deserted country roads 
near this small town, her two boys 
strapped in their car seats in the back. 

The police have said she was desperate, 
contem plating suicide and distraught over 
what she feh was a life collapsing around 
her. Her marriage was dissol ving ; a boy- 
friend had ended their relationship, in part 
because of her children, and she was wor- 
ried about money, the police said. 

Ultimately, she could not take her own 
life. But she has admitted that she found 
her way to an isolated lake and sent her car 
into the water with her sons Michael, 3, 
and Alexander, 14 months, still in the back 
seat 

Her confession came after a nine-day 
hunt for the kidnapper that she claimed 
had drives off with her boys. 

"Every part erf her world was falling 
apart, and one thing led to another ” a 
police source said. "There doesn’t seem to 
have been great plans aforethought in her 
actions. They just happened.” 

On Saturday, confined to prison on 
murder charges, Mrs. Smith, 23. was once 
more suicidal, state officials said. She is 
being monitored by a camera, and a prison 
guard checks on her every 15 minutes. 

“She's been very quiet, very stoic and 
cool, not talkative at ail,” said Robyn Zim- 
merman, a spokeswoman for the state De- 
partment of Corrections. 

The path that led her to her high-securi- 
ty cell appears uncomplicated: a small- 
town life revolving around children, work 
and friends. 

She loved to shop and to attend Friday 
night football games at the high school, 
and she proudly showed off photos of her 
children. 

She worked as a secretary at a plant that 
makes decorative trims for textiles, where 


her boyfriend, Tom Findlay, 27, also 
worked. Before that, she worked at a gro- 
cery store, where her husband, David, 24, 
worked. 

"Everybody shopped there, and every- 
body saw her as a real attractive; friendly, 
outgoing woman,” said Fred Ddk, a local 
resident. “Wc all used to see hex with those 
children and thought of them as a beauti- 
ful warm family. 

But others say that life was not always so 
easy for Susan Smith- 

Union County’s sheriff, Howard Wells, 
a friwiri of the family, said she had a 
"troubled background.” Her father com- 
mitted suicide when she was very young, 
and her marriage had been difficult. 

In the weeks leading up to Oct. 25, the 
night the boys disappeared, her troubles 
piled up. In late September, she filed for 
divorce. 

On OcL 18, she received a letter from 
Mr. Fmdlay breaking off their relationship 
and saying that he was not ready for die 
pressures of fatherhood. 

Also in mid-October, David Smith, who 
had often dropped by her house to spend 
time with the kids, stopped visiting alto- 
gether, according to a neighbor, Catherine 
Frost 

Mrs. Smith told the police that she was 
also worried about money. She earned just 
under S 1 7,000 annually, but was to receive 
$115 a week from the boys’ father for chad 
support. 

"She came from a pretty well-off family 
and was used to getting everything she 
wanted and was kind of spoiled and snob- 
bish,” said Kim Gardlcr, a Union resident. 
"So all that must have been kind of hard.” 

Still, for most of those who knew her, the 
news that Mrs. Smith had lolled hex own 
children was unthinkable. 

“I couldn’t believe it," said Tracy Love- 
lace, who has been dose to Mis. Smith 
since high school “I still can’t believe it 
That’s not the person I know. Something 
happened in her mind.” 


U. JUUUVU, UV JL -y 

Mis. Smith told the police that she felt JXl uColUTC 
desperate because of her difficulties. . 

Experts interviewed Sunday said sura | Ik KKrhfn 

pressures could lead parents to abuse their \Jf_l LVlHIHh 
children but mieht not totallv exolain Mrs. CD - 


children but might not totally explain Mrs. .CD -- . 

Smith’s actions. • % ■ ConfUalbpOy SteffFnmDopa^a 

"This is a very strange situation," said BHUING — China said Sun- 
Michael Lamb, a research psychologist at ^ that it had released four 
the National Institute of Child Health and people imprisoned for matin* 
Human Development in Bethesda. 1 keep Jnti-govemmenr activities in 
waiting to hear or read about the missmg \ 9 gg and also freed four Tibw- 
piece, what else was going on." ans sentenced for advocating 

"From what we know, this is a young the region’s independence, 
woman having a difficult period -in hex A representative of a human- 

Hfe,” he said, with "lots of things going rights organization described 
wrong with her life at one time." • the releases as apparently a ges- 

“That sort of stress is what’s often asso- tore to the international com- 


ans sentenced for advocating 
the region’s independence. 

A representative of a human- 
rights organization described 
the releases as apparently a ges- 
ture to the international com- 


dated" with chfld abuse, he said, "lashing muoity just days ahead of a 


out at a child, snapping” from pressure. 

"In this case," Mr. Lamb said, “it seems 
to be a much more premeditated situation. 
That type of premeditated assault on 
young children is much less common. It 


major world trade meeting in 
Indonesia. 

A military crackdown on stu- 


dent protests in Beijing in June 
1989 was followed by the arrest 


nukes you think it was a woman with prior and sentrapng of many sup- 

- i v,- . i i- nnrfM nf tlw> wnM 


psychiatric problems in addition to stress. 

pointed to studies that mdicateihat abu- Hu. JLeeg 

But "the research is being questioned on medical 

that,” said Maura O’Keefe, assistant pro- It ^ ^e fom: Tibetans re. 
lessor erf social work at the University of . ^ ^ nami- or -JA 

ssSSBS 


porters of the protest - 
The .Xinhua press agency 
named the first f our released as 


and said they bad been released 
on parole or on bail for medical 
treatment . _ 

It said the four Tibetans re 


vast majority” of abased children “grow ^ atSTanST^ 
^ThJrr of other van 1116 releascs 811 P^CC late- 

j£'^r bok,oto! °' ha ™- 

Mrs. Smith was not be allowed to attend Braingcaaims Tibet has been 
her sons* funeral on Sunday, restricted by a part of <"*«»* for 700 years, 
regulation that prohibits accused killers Tibetans seeking independence 
from attending services for their victims, Tibet had de facto indepen- 
Ms. Zimmerman said. ^ f™- mneh nf that rim* 


Mrs. Smith was visited Sunday by her 
attorney, David Brock, and a private psy- 
chologist She has not been allowed to have 
other visitors. 


the treaty as undermining Arab rights in Mus- 1 Anr* n 

lim lands and shrines in the Israeli-occupied Lyy O* Looking BeyOTld Flection Day AMERICAN TOPICS 


tern tones. 


Continued from Page 1 


text, cooperation would not 


KOREA: Seoul Tries to Come to Grips With U.S. Deal 


ton to "govern from the mid- nourish. The same may well be 
die.” Unless he finds grounds tnre m the House, where Rrore- 


Continued from Pag 2 1 
minister, excoriated Mr. Kim as 
being naive and too soft toward 
Norm Korea. 

Officials here emphasize that 
any moves to relax restrictions 
will be taken step by step, with 
Seoul watching for evidence 
that Pyongyang is living up to 
its commitments. One such 
commitment Seoul will stress is 
that North Korea resume talks 
with it North Korea reluctantly 
agreed to this in Geneva, but 
political analysts say North Ko- 
rea would much rather deal 
only with the United States. 

Many South Koreans are un- 
happy with the Geneva agree- 
ment They say it will provide 
immediate economic gains for 
North Korea while allowing it 
to defer international inspec- 
tions of its suspected nuclear 
sites for about five years. 

They also fed insecure in see- 
ing North Korea, the South’s 
archenemy, dealing directly 
with the United States, the 
South’s leading ally. People 
here complain that South Ko- 


rea was not a direct participant 
at Geneva, yet it is being asked 
to shoulder most of the $4 bil- 
lion cost of providing North 
Korea with two modern light- 
water nuclear reactors. 

How one feels about the 
agreement depends to some ex- 
tent on how one feels about 
reunification. Although almost 
all Koreans favor uniting North 
and South, there are two main 
schools of thought about how 
this should be done. 

One school thinks reunifica- 
tion should be gradual with 
steps first being taken to im- 
prove the economy of the 
North, in an attempt to avoid 
the rush of refugees and eco- 
nomic upheaval that accompa- 
nied the sudden German reuni- 
fication. The other school 
believes in waiting for North 
Korea to collapse economically 
and politically, and then mov- 
ing in. 

South Korea’s official posi- 
tion, based on economic ratio- 
nalism, is for gradualism. But 
emotionally. Having battled 


North Korea for decades, many 
people here would relish seeing 
the Communist government 
collapse. 

Some say North Korea will 
be opened to foreign influence 
by the entrance of South Kore- 
an and Western businesses, as 
well as by tiie arrival of South 
Korean technicians to build the 
nuclear plants mid the estab- 
lishment in Pyongyang of 
American and other Western li- 
aison offices and embassies. 

But for those who want to see 
North Korea collapse, the Ge- 
neva agreement is a disaster. It 
strengthens North Korea at a 
time alien it is suffering severe 
economic problems. 


for bipartisan comproiSse. the tentative Newt Gingrich of 
result will be gridttock, which Georgia has promised to take a 


Mr. Breaux and others see as bard line, either as speaker or as 
bad politics. “The^Oute House chief of 


But it takes two to tango, and staff Leon E. Panetta, warned 
the better the Republicans do recently of what he termed a 


Tuesday, the stronger position bidding war between the par- 
tly will be m to demand that ^ which the two would vie 


their agenda, including such t0 propose the largest tax cuts, 
items as the balanced-budget offsetbymostly flfusoiy reduc- 


amendment, be given priority. tions ^ federal spending. 

If the Republicans win the sev- while arguing that “the pres- 
en Senate seats they need to idem must reach out on a bipar- 


take control their versions of tisan basis.” Mr. Panetta said 
health rare reform (minimal) that Mr. Gingrich and his coun- 


and welfare reform (rigorous) terpart. Senator Bob Dole of 
would move to the top of the Kansas, “have to assume some 


responsibility for governing the 


Anumber of the Republicans country." 
given a good chance of gaining - Headded, “They can’t just be 


Senate seats would be consider- negative obstructionists.” 


CHAMP: 


ably more conservative than the An early test of whether co- 


senators they would replace, in- operation might be possible will 
eluding Oliver L. North in Vir- come in the postelection State- 


More Shoppers Torn to Flam-Label Goods 

Plain-label products are gaining popularity 'among U.S. 
supermarket shoppers. A distant relative of the generic foods 
that became popular in the late 1970s as the recession took 
hold, plain-label — also known as private-label or store brand 
— foods are sold under a store’s own name or a name created 
just for the outlet. 

Just about every supermarket has them, sitting on the same 
shelves as the better-known, higher-priced brand names. 
Plain-label items make up about 20 percent of the grocery 
market today, up from 15 percent in 1988, according to the 
Private Label Manufacturers Association in New York. 

Analysts say the reason is twofold: The price is right, and 
thequality has improved dramatically. 

"The private labels today are different than the generics of 
the past,” said John M. O’Neil, who follows the food industry 
for Oppenhdmer & Co. in New York. “The generics compet- 
ed only on price, and the quality suffered. 

“Now, it’s price value. You're getting the similar quality of 
the name brand at the lower price.” ... 

The price differences can be startling. 

At Schnucks, one of the biggest supermarket chains in SL 
Louis, a 2-liter bottle of Schnucks soda sells for 79 cents. 
Brand-name sodas cost $1.69. Schnucks com flakes sell for 
$ 1.19, compared with. $2.89 for the name brand. 


dence for much erf that time. 

Mr. Wang, 49, a teacher at 
Shanxi University, was sen- 
tenced to serve eight years from 
June 16, 1989. Xinhua said he 
was granted parole "because Ik 

deepened unders tanding of his 
crime and behaved well in pris- 
on.” 

Xinhua said Mr. Ge, 35, a 
college teacher also in Shanxi, 
was sentenced to seven years 
from June 12, 1989. It said that 
in prison he obeyed regulations 
and that he was freed for medi- 
cal treatment. 

Xinhua said Mr. Leng, 34, a 
worker in the northeastern city 
of Changchun, was sentenced 
to eight years from June 10, 
1989. He was given parole for 
his “good attitude” in recogniz- 
ing ms crime and his good be- 
havior, it said. 

It said Mr. Wu, 27 and unem- 
ployed, was sentenced to seven 
years by a court in Beijing. In 
February 1993 his term w# 


commutcd by 10 months. He 
was paroled because be gained 


Middle-Aged KO 


ginia, James M. Inhofe in Okla- ments erf top Republicans; an- 


Short Takes 


homa. Rick Santorum in 
Pennsylvania and Michael 


other will come in the vote on 
the new global free market pact. 



Contraued from Page 1 
er, peppered Foreman most of 
the night with his right-handed 
jabs and hooks. Foreman’s left 
eye grew partly dosed, the left 
side of his face bruised from the 
beating. 

It seemed certain that the end 
was near for Foreman — and 
this would really be the end. 
Once, it was thought that Fore- 
man, with 73 victories and four 
defeats, had retired. Thai was 
long, long ago, in 1977, after a 
loss to Jimmy Young in Puerto 
Rico. Foreman had won the ti- 
tle with a stunning two-round 
knockout of Joe Frazier in 
1973, before losing to Ali the 
next year. The night he lost to 
Young, Foreman said he had 
found religion. 

Foreman became an active 


DeWine in Ohio. If they win, negotiated under the General 
they would push the balance Agreement on Tariffs and 


the Republican caucus Trade over the last decade by 


to the right. 

In such a harsh political con- 


Republican and Democratic 
administrations. 


Perhaps the “pop walk” — marching an accused perpetra- 
tor erf some crime out of the police station in handcuffs in 
front of television cameras and curious onlookers — should 
be abolished, John 7101167 suggests in The New York Times 
Magazine. The perp walk “honors the police, sells papers, 
boosts television ratings and entertains the public — all at the 
expense of a person who is supposed to have the presumption 
of innocence.” 


VOTE: Republicans Scent Victory 

nmtmnrd from jfrge I that his party would hold con- 

_ . _ , „ trol of the House and the Sen- 


Continued from Page 1 

come, the newly elected Con- 
gress will be more conservative 


that his party would hold con- 
trol of the House and the Sen- 
ate. 

Mr. Dole said top Republi- 


andmorepolarized. Unless Mr. can priorities for the next Con- 
Chilton can appeal loa moder- ^ wouId include what he 


ale center in both parties, con- 
servatives in both parties are 


Fifty-seven years after the Walt Disney animated classic, 
“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” made its debut in 
theaters, the first video release arrived in retail stores last 
week to record demand. With about 27 million tapes ordered 
in North America at a list price, often discounted, of $26.99, 
“Snow White” is expected to become the best-selling cassette 
yet, breaking the record set by “Aladdin" — also a Disney 
release — by 3 million. 


was paroled because be gained 
understanding of his crime and 
behaved well in prisqn, it said. 

Robin Munro, Human 
Rights Watch/ Asia’s Hong 
Kong representative, said the 
releases might have been made 
some time ago, noting that Mr. 
Ge, who was diagnosed last 
year as suffering from cerebral 
thrombosis, was rraorted to 
have been freed in May by pro- 
Bering newspapers in Hong 
Kong. 

*T?s my guess that they’re 
announcing them now to fend 
off the Americans” at the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Conference 
forum in Indonesia, where Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton is to meet 
with his Chinese counterpart, 
Jiang Zemin, Mr. Munro said. 

(AP, Reuters, AFP) 


railed “anti-government" votes 
to reduce the staffs of members 


most likely to control the policy ^ Congress, to limit the terms 
a S coda - of members, to stiffen restric- 


According to Mr. Gramm tions on lobbying, to cut the tax 
and Mr. Dole, the conservative on capital gabs, to pass “real” 


preacher in his hometown, 
Houston. He preached — and 


program will be highlighted by health rare reform and to “take 
a proposed amendment to the some of the pork” out of the 


Drive-by tumor, courtesy of the Los Angeles County Trans- 
portation Commission: the Los Angeles Tunes reports that 
“two automobile drivers involved in a wreck at 2d and Spring 
Streets wwen’t exactly amused by an MTA bus that passed 
by. Speaking into his microphone, the bus driver blared at 
them, ‘You should have taken the b-u-u-s-s-s! You should 
have taken the b-u-u-s-s-s!’ ” 


Yeltsin Is Forced 
By Parliament to 
Sign Budget Law 


Houston. He preached — and 
he ale. He grew so large that few 
took him seriously when he 
came out of retirement in 1987 
after he had ballooned to 315 


Constitution that would require 
Congress to pass a budget each 
year that is m balance and to 
bar deficit spending. A two- 


recently enacted anti-crime bill 


International Herald Tribune. 


pounds (142 kilograms). Slow- 
ly, some of the weight came off, 
and although he always looked 
painfully slow in the ring, he 
never lost his ability to give and 
take punches. Qn Saturday 
night, at 250 pounds, he was 
ready. 

Moorer was out cold on the 
way to the canvas. At the in- 
stant that the referee, Joe Cor- 
tez, waved the fight over, Fore- 
man dropped to his knees to 
pray. 

"I exorcised the ghost once 
and forever,” Foreman said, al- 
luding to his loss of the title 20 
years ago to AIL “Fm heavy- 
weight champion.” 


thirds vote injxrth houses, foi- RUSSIA: President Realizes the Need for Compromise 

lowed by ratification by three- «' r 


fourths of the states, would be 
required to amend the Consti- 


Mr. Panetta labeled the 
isal “the same kind of 


tiie pro- 
of flim- 


Coutinued from Page 1 

N. Shokhin, a deputy prime 
minister who doubled as eco- 
nomics minister and one erf the 
last of the original reformers. 


that post, be will be better posi- On one level, Mr. Yeltsin has the 
tioned to monitor the budget, simply been coming to terms vided leeislainre 
r ^ ^ nUmh F ^aParijamenL that is weaker to jotaScwSd 

of Western®*! reformers in the than the dd one but nearly as prudent's ve£ w 

government is now very small antagonistic. elected last IWmhJT 

That does not displease Mr. « . 

Yeltsin. Even in «iE October. But 00 “o^er level like a Tkenewfaw forces the gov- 


flam from the 1980s,” when (Mr. Yeltsin accepted Mr. 
government spending and the Shokhin’s resignation on Sun- 


government is now very small 


That does not displease Mr. 
Yeltsin. Even in early October, 


federal debt ballooned under 
President Ronald Reagan. To 
balance the federal budget in- 
stantly without cutting Social 
Security would require a 30 per- 
cent cut in every other govern- 
ment program, including de- 
fense, he said. 


day.) 

So Saturday, Mr. Yeltsin ele- 
vated the strongest of the early 
reformers, Mr. Chubais, 39. to 


heralding a year of relative sta- E?*?? .$ en ‘? ra ^ secretary, Mr. 
bflity after shelling the old Par- I eitsi , n IS maneuvering. 


in October 1993, he shifts and 

spoke of a broader- based cabi- e Yf n ar ^ ltra TY decisions. 


be a first deputy prime minister 
in charge of economic policy. 


Though he acknowledged 
probable losses for the Demo- 
crats, Mr. Panetta predicted 


in charge of economic policy. 

Mr. Chubais is widely re- 
spected in the West for pushing 
through Russia’s privatization 
program against conservative 
opposition. While giving up 


net. 

Having risen to power on an 


to keep his own power. 
Mr. Yeltsin presuxnai 


elected fast December. 

The new law forces the gov- 
ernment to keep to a strict tune- 
table in formulating the budget. 
Mr. Yeltsin had been especially 
unhappy ovct a clause that said 
the government had to split its 


_ . ower on an Mr. Yd tan pres umabl y un- 

anti.- Communist, pro-demo- derstands that the deputies will 
cratic wave, Mr. Yeltsin has de- never love him. But he also 


aHwuuig uiio uuec-montn peri- 
ods. He said this would limit the 
cabinet's freedom of maneuver. 


■aJu m . 1 never love torn. But he also A presidential statement ac- 
aded he most move, demnvely knows that this may be his last comJLtying the 

stabilize the economy plsitOTdtsm’s SS^ 


ssa ?^ 3 SSF S£gB»e 


ACCESS NUMBERS CQUNTRCS 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTWE5 


AnKktB Somou 
I Artigua (ttedi a ntl phorat) 

AMfgua (pay ptHOM] 

Arganrino 

Aimnia 

AinMIa (Opto*) + 
AadraEa (MM| + 
AuwtaB 



Beifeodoi A 
Mgtam + 

Mm (hoM.) ■■ 

imiwlt./ 

Bo&vta 

Sraz& 

British Virgin U. 4 
Buigoiig A 


633.1000 

«o 

1 - 000 - 346-4663 

00- I - 800 - 777-1 
t-10-155 
006^31 M0 

1- MO-Mt -877 
022 - 903-014 
1 - 400 - 360-211 1 
140 M 7740 N 
0100-10014 
556 


Cyprus ✓ ■ 

Cx"h RapvWk +/ 
Pnmu.lt + 

Domniknn RapuUe A 
Ecuador / 

Bflyjrf (Caiiu) + 

0 Salvador + 

Ft? kdandi 
Union* + 


Chita 

China (EDflBdO +✓ 
China (Mandarin) -I nT 
CelmnUa (EngOihJ 
Co tom W a (Spanish) 
Costa Ska + 

Croal«B+ 


1 - 800-6238877 
0800-3333 
000-8016 
1 - 400 - 877-8000 
00400 -I 010 
l-SOO- 877 -tOOO 
00+0117 
108-13 
108-16 
9 KM 30010 
700 - 130-110 

163 

99 - 3400-13 


Gorman, + 
Awn ♦ 
(ran 

Guseraaia + 
Honduras A 
Haag Kong 
Hong Kong A 
Hungary IV 
Iceland +■ 
India + 
kideumia 


Isrotrt + 
Italy + 

/amakxi - 


080 - 900-01 
0042 - 087-1 87 
BOO- 1-0877 
J - 800 - 75 1 - 7*77 
171 

3564777 

0 U 364777 

191 

006890 - 100-3 

9800 - 1-0284 

19*0087 

01300013 

008001 - 41 ! 

930-1366 

195 

001 - 800-1313000 

MO -1877 

Oil 

00 + 800-01 477 
999-003 
000.137 
001-801-15 

I- 60 GJ 5-2001 

177 - 102-2727 

172-1877 

I- 800 -S 774 QOO 


Japwi ( 1 DQ (BtglBh) + 
Japan (KDOJ (English) + 
Japan (JapanaM) + 
Kanye J 
Knsaa (Pae o ns) + 
Korea [KT) ♦* 

Kuwtth 

UacMmMn + 

UHuxmto/ 
lu«anbaurg 
Moors o 
Mahytla + 

Monica + 


0066-55477 

0039-131 

0066-55488 

0800-12 

oca 9-1 3 

009.16 

000-777 

1554777 

#♦197 

08004115 

0800-121 

8004016 

95400477 -MOO 

19 +M 87 


Nath. AnriBe) 

[Curacao & Banalrw) + 

I Mil PJIPI I T 

New Zealand A 
(In-eosmfcry caflU) 

Now Zeetnsd 

Mai i ug ua ( H— tp > tefUdi] 0 
Nicaragua (MraagraSpadM] o 
Nkoragaa {rauMe Jimi ei ecJ 

Norway + 


001 - 800 - 745-1111 
06 + 022-4 U 9 
nM-aama-phHH 


(Vsraguay A 


000499 

171 

16 ! 

024 -EaBUiarSiiaiiUina. 

800-19877 

115 

008 - 17-800 


Ptoni/ 

^WOppInai (EIPI station* only) 
rblCpplne, (PtsIKoai) A 
Philippines (PtDT) 

Poland + 

Portugal* 

Puerto Rka — 

Roman i a +■ 

Russia (Moscow) + 

Itntki (all oUwri +■ 

Sa ipan 

TMan end Bala +■ 

San M arina + 

Saudi Arabia 
Sngn>«o + 

South Africa + 

Spain 
St Luda O 
St.tudaA 
Sweden + 

Switzerland + 

Syria * 

Taiwan a 

Ihailcnd / 

Trlnidod & "Mtago 
(parts a/ entry arty] 


ACCESS NUMflatS coUNrmiES 


106 

010541 

102-611 

ID&-I6 

00109 - 800-115 

05017 - 1-877 

14004774000 

0)4004877 

155-6133 

8095 - 1 55-61 S 3 

2354333 

1-3354333 

172-1877 

1800-15 

8000 - 177-177 

0400494001 

900494013 

1 - 800 - 277^468 

1 ST 

020799411 

155-9777 

0888 

0080-144877 

001 - 099 . 13-877 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


Turkey + 

U 4 . Virgin Uonrii > 

uajL- 

UVrain* 

LWtad Arab Enliatas + 

UnhedlCnadAmfan 

Un 8 *d Kingdom (Mercury) 
Uruguay at 
Vatican Qfy + 

Veneauala l&tgMi) 
Venaira lo (Sparith) 


00400 - 1-4477 

1 - 800477-1000 

14004774000 

8-100-15 

80ai31 

0800494177 

0500494877 

000417 

17 X 1177 

aoo-11114 

BOO- 1 1 1 1-1 


Sprint. 


tit mini rn’ir wdtig Li Kim a Jl.mUb/tcnmJ tn 
M tflgalMptekt% Sprint Oprtttr. h’s i hat rosy 


CofM* tasti^ricm oOBri u*«b C twelrv « couetiy m«irg b ovaitabi* tebnxi io Jurat fr» cuftem number. rujitvoer -Mnnaot mfcMtoeai nmben eoH S*rtalAcc««j Number N rtuj count, t, „ | i ic . . . ■ . 

CWSrtgW'erabwilWIperwiIttia^^ ♦ Won [« second tan + P**c piron*! nay ceH* O' «nl /Awtabtaalmwipkorai A avvloUt. heni m ph™*, - Htt rraPmtnir“i ta cmeWycaOng owagfe^y. A FONQtBC bBrnp cato 11^. 

SprM Open** 44 Iram pay ptaw outh nrt hrtsen -an Kxw Ttmn tl-hl -7?*- A-tlHafato pel, Iran JadiMtai yhc*y. a- par ■ toati cu es-toueiry , Alw 1 


l ^»tanai»y.OaW)ll 


lj-* V&P 


#■) 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — President Bo- 
ris N. Yeltsin reluctantly admit* 
ted defeat on Sunday in a dis- 
pute with Parliament, signing a 
law he had earlier rejected that 
restricts the government's free- 
dom of maneuver in imple- a 
menting the 1995 budget * 
Mi*. Yeltsin’s signature marks 
the first time the weak and di- 


i'., rib’ 1 







JlS. 


vMjJj & 


u Jcr -* 

- ' n ^b 

«£*! 

*'*v 

d-tJ^'i'd- 

7*«sv^> 

^, e S 

S >0, >*> 

2c ^ • 


k2c-« f 

ig';-- , ^ '-^ 

efril't 


-r ' - ,c i’l- 

'■ »sr,. • 


Os u.-'f. 

■•_ £.U 
: -Jl ‘“V 

“*• , '-' r Cb 


-■ w. 


0 ir «.lifc'i 

“5V> 


~ iV- _ 

S’&rr.-'i 
• : >. 


V:r> •• 




r' ., 


Ill 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 5 


jPf'op Planes: High on the Jitter Scale, but Often the Only Way to Go 


y dam Bryant inai propeller aircraft arc the complain about the noise and 
• • Tima Service W *Y toey can reach their the of ten-bumpy rides assodat- 

NEW YORK — Although ed with propeller planes. Travel 

many passenger express co^ iets^7h a Jl5SS,f!5 C 5 cplacin8 agenls r «?r that some people go 

cena over flying in prq>dler- propeller planes on out of their way to avoid the 


driven planes — and some com- 

ffV?? .to “riding on 

the back of a mosquito” a 

growing number of pas 

m the United States are] 


more routes as a way to cut 
costs in an industry that lost 
$12.8 bQhon over the last four 
years. 

But they arc not very popular 
with passengers, many of whom 


way 

smaller planes, even driving to 
nearby cities that have jet ser- 
vice. 

“TO never take them again if 
i have a choice,” said Karen 
Beaurigard, an administrator 


with the state of Michigan who 
flew, in a propeller-driven 
plane, through the same storm 
in which the American Eagle 
Flight 4184 crashed Oct 31 in 
Rosdawn, Indiana, killing all 
68 people aboard. 

“When I came in Monday 
night it was harrowing.” she 
said. “I prayed all the way." 

To some degree, concerns 



By. Don Phillips 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON -The Federal Avi- 
anon Administration has issued new op- 
«ratmg procedures for planes like ihe one 

that crashed last week in Indiana, advis- 
ing pitots not to use the autopilot in icing 

conditions and to follow carefuINaS 
recommended ice-avoidance practices. 

'uEL**?** ^mistrator, David R. 
Mmam, also called a meeting of officials 
rromeach airline that operates the popu- 
tor twin-turboprop Alfc-72 or ATR-42 


on the Use of Autopilot 

engaged, ice can form on the wings 
ail of an ATR under certain condl- 


orders issued Thursday by American Ea- 
gle to its pilots. American Eagle is the 
largest operator of ATRs, which are 
high-wing, short-range aircraft. The 
company stressed it was not prejudging 
the cause of the crash but taking prudent 

precautions. 

Almost from the start, investigators 


Even with anti-ice 
devices engaged, ice can 

“to stress the map^tiiSs rf compliance form on the wings and 

tailof an ATR. 


and jo discuss ATR operations in icme 
conditions.” 


The agency’s advice to crews of all 
classes of the twin-tinbqprcp ATR se- 
ries, although couched in technical lan- 
guage, boiled down to this: Fly the plane 

IrnnwatF » i»u. : » . J t 


yourself , keep your speed up, don't use 
*5 when ‘ 


wing Qms when holding, avoid freezing 
rain and: in general don’t do some of the 
th i ng s that the crew of American Fa ale 
Flight 4184 did before it cradled OcL 31, 
killing all 68 people aboard. 

The recommendations are similar to 


for the National Transportation Safety 
Board suspected that die plane might 
have fallen victim to a phenomenon that 
has been documented several times in 
the past involving the ATR-42, a shorter 
version of the ATR- 72-2 10 that crashed. 

The Frencb-ltalian consortium that 
makes the ATR. determined years ago 
that certain precautions must be taken in 
icing conditions. Even with anti-ice de- 


vices 1 
and tail 

dons unless pilots fly the plane some- 
what differently. 

One of the main precautions is to add 
at least 10 knots, about 1 1 miles an hour, 
to normal air speed. Pilots also should 
watch for signs that the plane is becom- 
ing sluggish or slow to respond. 

In a 1987 crash in Italy and a near- 
crash in Wisconsin in 1988, however, 
investigators discovered that when the 
autopilot was engaged, pilots might not 
notice the telltale signs that ice was form- 
ing and might be presented with a sud- 
den emergency when the autopilot deter- 
mined that it could not handle the 
emergency and shut itself off. 

Flight 4184’s cockpit voice recorder 
contained a warning signal that the auto- 
pilot had turned off just as the plane’s 
ailerons — movable wing parts that con- 
trol turns — “deflected rapidly,” accord- 
ing to the board chairman, Jim HalL 
Thai sent the plane into a right roll. It 
recovered slightly, but then rolled over 
on its back and plunged downward 


about the safety record of pro- 
peller aircraft are justified Al- 
though there are no direct com- 
parisons of the Safety records of 
jet aircraft and propeller 
planes, industry executives gen- 
erally agree that the rate of fatal 
accidents has been two to three 
times higher on propeller planes 
than it is on jets. 

Generally, small er propeller 
planes have a higher accident 
rate than the larger ones. 

The American Eagle ATR-72 
that crashed last week was 
among the largest of the com- 
mercial propeller planes. 

The number of passengers 
boarding propeller planes each 
year more than doubled in the 
last 10 years, to 52 milli on, ac- 
cording to the Regional Airline 
Association in Washington. 

While the propeller planes 
are the only choice available at 
about 7 of every 10 airports in 
the United States, they are also 
being used to fly more short 
routes from big hub airports. 
Since 1988, for example, de- 


partures on commuter airlines 
from hub 


hub airports has grown 73 


iepartures on short routes has 
increased only 3 percent, ac- 
cording to statistics compiled 
by Samuel C. Buttrick, an air- 
line stock analyst at Kidder, 
Peabody in New York. 

Some city officials believe 
that without jet service, their 
communities appear second- 
rate to outsiders. So in cities 
like Amarillo, Texas, officials 
have agreed to guarantee prof- 
its to an airline to provide jet 
service. 

Travel agents say that cus- 
tomers sometimes switch their 
vacation plans once they learn 
they have to board a propeller 
aircraft to get to their destina- 
tion. 

Estelle Lessack, president of 
Travel Trends, an agency in 
Fort Lee, New Jersey, said she 
had some customers who flew 
on turboprops when they trav- 
eled alone, but refused to do so 
when traveling with their chil- 
dren. 

“Many people are fatalists,” 
she said. “They just don't want 
be fatalists with their families. 

Yet, despite such concerns. 


the American Eagle crash does 
not appear to have changed 
many travelers’ minds about 
flying on turboprops. American 
Eagle, other regional airlines 
and travel agents say they have 
seen no measurable decline in 
reservations since the crash. 

By comparison, US Air esti- 
mated that its two jet crashes 
this year prompted many trav- 
elers to switch airlines, which 
cost the company about 540 
minion in lost revenue. 

Industry experts said that 
passenger traffic on turboprops 
held steady during the past 
week because many passengers 
had no choice but to fly the 
smaller planes unless they 
wanted to drive to another air- 
port And they said that many 
travelers appeared to have de- 
cided long ago whether they 
would fly on the small er air- 
craft, and the recent crash Had 
not changed their mind. 

Some people even enjoy fly- 
ing on smaller planes. “The pi- 


lots are friendlier and you can 
see out the front window," said 
Shelley Ruckel, a travel agency 
manager in Lansing, Mi ch i ga n. 

Although many travelers see 
propeller planes as an older 
technology than jets, the U.S. 
fleet of passenger-carrying tur- 
boprops is somewhat younger 
than the jet fleets, with an aver- 
age age of 9.4 years in 1993, 
compared with 10.8 years for 
jets. 

Since April, the National 
Transportation Safety Board 
has been studying the safety of 
the commuter ainme industry, 
looking at issues that include 
pilot training. Its report is due 
this month. 

The International Airline 
Passengers Association, an or- 
ganization in Washington that 
monitors air safety in foreign 
countries, said that travelers 
should fly on propeller planes 
only in good weather and in 
daylight hours to minimize the 
chance of accidents. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


^MtR a 


Court Gives U.S. Leeway on Return of Cubans 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — A three-judge 
federal panel in Atlanta has given per- 
mission to the United States torepatnate 
Cubans who say they want to go home, a 
victory in the Ozaton administration’s 
efforts to give Cubans who fled by boat 
no other' choice but to go back to their 
Communist homeland. * 


The United States has interned more 
than 30.000 Cubans at U.S. military 
bases at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and in 


P anama, denying them the status of po- 
taeees that was routinely grant- 


litical refugees 

ed Cabans for more than 30 years. 

Faced with no hope of winning asylum 
in the United Stales, about 1 ,000 Cubans 
have asked to return home. 


The court action in Atlanta on Friday 
overturned a recent decision by a federal 
judge in Miami to bar the government 
from sending any Cubans back. 

The Miami decision had appeared to 
open the way for the Cubans to seek 
asylum in Guantanamo and P anam a as 
if they already had arrived in the United 
States. 


.ing from West, EUy Scinp- 
pers landed in good six-dia- 
mond contract. This would 
have been easy after a spade 
lead, allowing the spade queen 
to score in the dummy. A pas- 
sive lead in a red suit would 
have done better: After draw- 
ing trumps South would have 
finessed the dub queen, expect- 
ing, if this failed, to develop 
dummy’s fifth club as the 12th 
trick. 


with the defense unable to cash 
a chib winner. That would no 
doubt have been the right play 
against an average player, but 


ScUppers noted that her left- 
hand opt 


opponent was Dorothy 
Truscott, who has helped the 
United States win four world 
women’s team titles. 

Judging that West was quite 
capable of having led the club 
seven from K-7. South led a 
club at the fifth trick and mark» 
her slam. 


But Schippers was faced with 
>mpt lead < 


BOOKS 


SHADOWS OF THE MIND: 
A Search lor the Mining 
Science of Consciousness 


t Jfy Roger Penrose. Illustrated. 
^457 pages. $25. Oxford University 


Press. 


Reviewed 

Lehmann-: 


establish all the tine 
turns of . ordinary aril 
Penrose suggests that, 

“Human intuition and insight 
cannot be reduced to any set of 
rules," meaning that the mind 
and the computer are essentially 
different. 

. Moreover, Penrose argues in 
part two of “Shadows,” increas- 
Cferistopher ; mg evidence is unfolding that if 
human consciousness tran- 
scends computational logic, it 


mathematical explication of 
quantum phenomena, may 
sound a bit diffi cult for nonex- 
perts 10 absorb. To readers who 
feel daunted, Penrose offers 
what he describes as “a relatively 
painless route to the essentials of 
this case,” to be obtained by 
readme approximately wo doz- 
en of the book’s 1 13 sections. 

Yet because Penrose- writes 


the dielectric properties of the 
materials concerned are suffi- 
ciently extreme, then there is the 
possibility of large-scale quan- 
tum coherence similar to that 
which occurs in the phenomena 
of superconductivity and super- 
fluidity — sometimes referred to 
as Bose- Einstein condensation 
— even at the relatively high 
temperatures that are present in 


the prompt lead of Lhe club sev- 
en. As this way was likely to be 
a singleton, she could not afford 
to finesse and suffer an immedi- 
ate ruff. She therefore put up 
the ace, cashed dummy's red 
king and played to the dia- 
mond. It was now very proba- 
ble that West’s original distri- 
bution was either 7-3-2- 1 or 7-2- 
2-2, for with 7-1-2-3 a heart lead 
would have been likely. And as 
the club two had been played, 
the seven could not be the top 
of a doubleton. 

If, as it seemed, the dub sev- 
en was indeed a singleton. 
South needed to play die ace 
and another spade, establishing 
dummy’s queen for a discard. 


NORTH 
*Q42 
0 K 

C-KQJ2 
+ AQ1063 


WEST (D> 

♦ KJ 10 9765 
O 10 2 


084 

*K7 


EAST 

*3 

UQJ98543 
03 

*J 982 
SOUTH 
«AB 
O A76 
O A 10B765 
*54 


Both sides were vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

West North 

East 

South 

3 • 

3 N.T. 

Pass 

4* 

Pass 

40 

Pass 

60 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led the chib seven. 


I S the digital computer mere-. 

ly ' ' 


a simpler version ofthe 
human brain, as many theorists 
contend? If in fact it is, the 
jHcationsare scary. 

•or then, as Roger Penrose 
its out in his profo un d new 


may well obey different phya- 
i classical 03 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 




cal laws from the classical ones 
that govern synaptic action. 
The author speculates that 
these transcendent laws could 
be those of the stillpuzzling and 
paradoxical _ reality of quantum 


points out m ms prorouna. new p»iau««uu w- M unu u “ u 

book, "Shadows of lhe Mind: A mcdianics,mwhichan indeter- 
Search for the Missing Science urinate event can simultaneous- 


of Consciousness,” “all think- 
ing is computation; in particu- 
lar, fedi&gs of conscious aware- 
ness are evoked merely by the 
carrying out of appropriate 
co mpu ta t ions." And it is only a 
maw«r of time before the fabri- 
cators of artificial intelligence 
win be producing minds that 
make human beings obsolete. 

Bat not to worry; it isn’t true, 
argues Penrose, -who is Rouse 
Balt professor of mathematics 
at the . Umvtxaty of Oxford 

m - • TT— 


ly happen and not happen and 
where the cat in Erwin Schro- 
dingcr’s well-known thought 
experiment is both alive and 
dead. 

Now of course wriHnfonncd 
readers will recognize these ar- 
guments as coming from Pen- 
rose’s previous book, “The Em- 
peror’s New Mind,” which was 
greeted by several expert read- 
ers as one of the best bocks ever 
written on modem physics. 

But as Penrose captains in the 
“ his new 


• Hehnut Newton, the pho- 
tographer, is reading ‘"The Kid 
Stays in the Picture.” the auto- 
biography of the movie mogul 
Robert Evans. 

“Robert Evans is a friend of 


mine, and he writes exactly as 
law- 


he talks. He profiles mob 
yers, studio executives and star- 
lets. It’s not terribly profound, 
but it’s veiy Hollywood. And 
it’s vary, very funny.” 

(MarceUe Katz, IHT) 



fed 


and, with StqAm Hatriring, the preface to “Shadows, 
winner Of lhe 1988 Wolf Prize book goes considerably beyond 
fnr nhvKtex. ' bis earner 


forphyrics. 

'• Consciousness is more than 
comp utation, Penrose reasons, 
n*mg the famous theorem posed 
by the Gzech-bona logician Kurt 
Goddin 1930; which proves that 
“no formal system erf sound 
irathematical niles of proof can 
ever suffice, even in principle, to 


one, first by respond- 
ing in detail to those who criti- 
cize his use of Godd’s theorem, 
and second by speculating far 
more precisely on the location of 
the brain’s quantum rites. 

Such a book, with its some- 
what technical discussions of 
Godd’s ideas and its necessarily 


with such precision, ■ 
even when he is most obscurely 
technical that you are grasping 
what is important about his ar- 
gnmcnt 

As be concludes, “According- 
ly, the neuron levd of descrip- 
tion that provides the currently 
fashionable picture erf the brain 
and mind is a mere shadow of 
the deeper level of cytoskdetal 
action — and it is at this deeper 
levd where we must seek the 


physical basis of mind!’ 
S ummit 


biological systems.” Talk about 
astounding science! 

Finally, what is perhaps most 
arresting about Penrose's narra- 
tive is the way purely mathe- 
matical discoveries seem to 
foreshadow findings about 
physical reality. At least in the 
author’s thinking this is certain- 
ly true of GodeTs theorem, 
whose proof was study not 
originally intended to support 
the possibility of lhe quantum 
nature of human consciousness. 


nmming up one physicist’s 
conclusions, Penrose writes that 
“so long as the energy of meta- 
bolic drive is huge enough, and 


Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 
is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


MAILED FROM AMERICA 


DIRECT FINN AMERICA 

We buy and ship to you worldwide. 
Food, tapes, books, clothes, etc. 
Mail order Forwairfng 

lunu Hiwmi t 


25 UcLeen Drive, Sutbuty, MA 01776 
Ht 50W43-7751 - Fas 506-443-7762 USA 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


1 CONFERENCES, COURSES AND EXHIBITIONS 

NOV.20 &27 1830 ajn. to 1230 pjn.) 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14 

WORLD ENERG1E INDEX 

CoKial Iraaest initiative 
to be hdd alihe Nw Acropofc France 
Eimara fee includes the program, 
reserved sea. badge and subsequoi report. 
Lrmned number d places 

Maltre deltitauie 1800 F Lectures 1.700 F 
coroesmen. 1,600 F General public 230 F 
Associations. I»F Students- flOF 

Reservations by fex (33) 83 27 09 31 
andbynofe 

Secretariat EVALORATCCSCH Expertises 
BP 55. 54602 VDas-Us-Naacy Cedes 
FRANCE, ret (33) 83 28 3 1 0& 

Insurance Professionals 

Who noride Financial Products. Services 
& Advice to US. Expatriates. 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co is 
pleased to announce its recent acceptance 
by the LUe Assurance and Unit Ttust 
Regulatory Onpmisattan (Laura) 
Semnwf introducing lohn HancodCs finarv 
rial strength, products and services. 
300-MMpjn. -The Regent. London 

222 MaryfeboneRd- Mary iebooe Tube Stc^). 
Orff or /ai Terrance F. One, CLU 
Regional VP, Fafafleld, CT USA 
TeL 203-331-9616 Fine 203-331-9610 

NICE 

LONDON 

TO ADVERTISE PLEASE CONTACT PARIS 

ON FAX; (33-1)46379370 


Master reading 
suase skills 




a nd langua ge 

with 
the 

Herald 


Tribune 



IN THE NEWS will hel 
to become independent and efficient readers. 1 
compelling news and feature stories, essays and editorials, 
you will not only explore thought-provoking contemporary 
issues, but also investigate intriguing questions. 

Related activities and exercises, developed by the 
editors ofthe NTC Publishing Group, one of the leading 
American educational publishers, provide a complete 
framework for improving reading and language skills. 

The IN THE NEWS package, in a vinyl storage case, 
consists of: 

Zjjl The Manual ( 1 60 pages) with articles grouped into 
*■ thematic sections: News, Opinion, Business, Education, 
ifcj Aits and Leisure, Science and Environment, Sports. 

Every article is followed by exercises to help readers 
better understand its mainjxiints, vocabulay and idioms. 
Each section includes a “Focus on the Newspaper unit 
designed to familiarize readers with the characteristics of 
journalistic writing and enable them to analyze the content 
and viewpoint of newspaper articles. 

i Three audio cassettes with readings of selected articles 


2j toe manual, to help users improve comprehension 


as they explore challenging articles. 


IN THE NEWS is an excellent tool for improving vour 
English - and is a perfect gift for colleagues, friends or family 
members who are studying English as a foreign language. 
Order your copies today ! 


Heralb^Eribunc 


Return your order to International Herald Tribune Offers, 
37 Lambton Road, London SW2Q 0LW, England. 

For faster service, fax order to: (44B11 944 8243. 


Please send me copies of IN THE NEWS at UK£32 


(USS44.95) each, plus postage per copy: 

Europe £5.50; North America. Africa, Middle East £7.50; rest 
of world £11. 

Please allow up to 3 weeks for delivery. 

Name 


Address 


Crty/Code/Country 


Payment is by cnecSt card only. Please charge to my credit card: 
□Access CHAmex □ Driers □ Eurocard O MasterCard dVfsa 


Card No. 


Exp. date 


Signature 


Company EEC VAT D No. 




Ajriom WaS# RaihJatim. ^ 

,. I7t7 MauacWsC Aw****, N-W., 

602. Wisfeiriffw*. DC 20036- 
(202) 26W439? far more 





T he nightmare of anarchy and Woodshed in the 
African nation of Rwanda defies description. The 
hearts of everyone at the African Wfldfife Foundation 

go out to the people of Rwanda. 

Our hearts also go out to the mountain gorillas, popular- 
ized in the film "Gorillas in the Mist" who live in the Parc 
Des Vblcarrs in Rwanda. Understandably, many of the park 
rangers who guard this 
endangered species fled dur- 
ing the fighting. Others brave- 
ly remained at their post 
through most of the civil war, 
monitoring the gorillas' 
whereabouts and well-being. 

It is imperative for the 
gorillas’ safety that these wardens and rangers receive the 
food and basic equipment they need in order to return to the 
park and set up regular patrols to protect the gorillas. 

That's why the African Wildlife Foundation has estab- 
lished the Mountain Gorilla Emergency Fund. Our goal 
is to raise $85,000 to re-equip the rangers, and provide park 
personnel with food and equipment and money to live on 
for the next six months. 

please send a donation to the Mountain Gorilla Emergency 
Fund G/o African Wildlife Foundation. 1717 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Suite 602, Washington, D-C. 20036, or call 
(202) 265-8393 for more information. 

Together, we can ensure the survival of one of Earth's true 
wildlife wonders — the magnificent mountain gorillas 
of Rwanda! 


The IHT Pocket Diaiy Puts 1995 Right Into Your Pocket. 


Year after year — even at a period 
when (Banes abound — the International 
Herald Tribune flat, silk-gram leather 
diary is the hit ofthe season. 

Ingeniously designed to be thimer- 
than-thin, it still brings you everything . . . 
including a built-in note pad with atways- 
avfdkdde “jotting paper”. Plus there are 
conversion tables cf weights, measures and 
distances, a list of national holidays by country, 
a wine vintage chart, and many other usefuli 
facts. AH in this incredibly flat little book that 
slips easily into a pocket. 

The perfect for almost anyone . . . 

including yourself. 

Please allow three weeks for delivery. 



■ Measures 8 x 13 cm (51/4x3 in. j. 

■ Black leather cover with gill rne^d corners. 

■ Week- al-a-glance forum, printed on French Mne paper with 
gilded page edges. 

1 1995 notable dares and national holidays in over 80 countries; 

world tune-zooe tabic: 



codes and country prefixes 

• Blue ribbon page marker. 

* Includes removable address 
book dial fits snugly into is 
own allt pocket 


■Each diary packed in a bhie 
gift box. 


* Corporate personalization and 
discounts are available. 

For details, fax Paul Baker at 
(4481)9448213. 


Please send me_^_J995 IHT Pocket Diaries. 


Price includes initials, paridng and postage in Europe: 

I- 4 diaries UK £22 (U.S.S33) each INOIALS 

up lo 3 per diary 


Please charge to my craft card: 
EH Access EH Amfix ED Diners 

CardN* 

Exp. Signature — — 


ED Eurocard ED MasterCard ED Visa 


Name, 


5- 9 (fiarieftUK£20J0 (11^531) each 
10- 19 diaries UK £18 (US.S27) each 


Address, 


□ Additional popagw outside Europe £.4.50 (U.S-S6.9Q) 

ED C?heck here for deb verv outsick! Europe by rostered or 
certified mail: £5.75. (U-S.S8.60) per package plus postage. 

Payment is by credit card oofy. Afl iiMyor cards accepted. 


City /Code. 


Country. 


Company EEC VAT ED N°_ 


Mail or fax this order form to: In tern a tio na l Herald Tribune Offers, 

37 Lambton Road, London SW20 OLW U.KL Fax: (44 8 1 ) 944 8243. 


■9 

t 


1 


_ . _ .f .^t_ .* -.,1 ; 











Page 6 


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 

OPINION 


Iteralb 


INTERNATIONAL m* 

d-U I 



tribune 


PL'EHJSHED KITH THE NEW TORK TIMES AND THE Hr AS HIM ITOH POST 


A Wider European Union 


Five years after the fall of the Berlin 
Wall Europe remains economically divid- 
ed between East and West. The European 
Union spent most of that period trying to 
strengthen links among its West European 
members instead of reaching out to the 
post-Communist countries of the East, 
unnecessarily complicating the Eastern- 
ers’ transition to democratic capitalism. 
Thanks mainly to political shifts in key 
West European countries, a less parochi- 
al outlook is taking hold. 

Austria, Norway, Sweden and Finland 
are scheduled to be admitted next year. 
The most advanced post-Communist eco- 
nomies. Poland. Hungary and the Czech 
Republic, have a realistic chance of admis- 
sion within the next decade. But some 
Mediterranean countries still fear Easton 
Europe as a competitor for financial re- 
sources and political influence. Washing- 
ton could help cairn these fears and en- 
courage broader European unity. Eco- 
nomic integration is as important to East 
European stability as NATO membership, 
and far less provocative to Moscow. 

Germany is the main champion of 
bringing in the East The viability of its 
eastern neighbors affects its own national 
security, and Germans do not want their 
eastern border to become the frontier 
between a “have” and a “have not** Eu- 
rope. Britain and the Netherlands also 
favor eastward expansion. 

Until recently, a Mediterranean bloc 
made up of France, Italy. Spain. Portugal 
and Greece resisted opening toward the 
east. These countries worry about a reallo- 
cation in regional subsidies, competition 
for their farmers and a shift in the Europe- 
an Union’s political center from the Medi- 


terranean toward the German-oriented 
east. They also fear neglect of their own 
security concerns about Islamic militants 
in nearby North Africa. But the new con- 
servative governments in France and Italy 
look more favorably on eastward expan- 
sion. These governments are more enthusi- 
astic about free markets and less interested 
in a bureaucratically unified West than 
their center-left predecessors. 

These changes contributed to the suc- 
cess of a breakthrough meeting last Mon- 
day in Luxembourg between European 
Union foreign ministers and their counter- 
parts from Poland, Hungary, the Czech 
Republic, Slovakia. Bulgaria and Roma- 
nia. AD of these East European countries 
now have, or are in the process of ratifying, 
formal association agreements with the 
European Union providing for step-by- 
step access to the single European market. 

Luxembourg was a step in the right 
direction. But the main decisions on the 
future shape of the European Union will 
be taken at the 1996 Intergovernmental 
Conference to review the Maastricht 
treaty. Since the United States is not a 
member of the European Union, it will 
not directly participate in these decisions. 
But it can and should speak out for bring- 
ing in the East. A stronger U.S. voice 
would help reassure Mediterranean 
countries that German influence would 
be balanced and that their concerns over 
North Africa would not be slighted. 

What the European Union must now 
decide is whether it is going to be an 
institution for binding together a long- 
divided continent or a perpetuator of 
those old divisions. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Reducing Russia’s Army 


The Clinton administration has made 
remarkable headway in its efforts to help 
Russia dismantle its nuclear forces. Wash- 
ington's engagement in this enterprise has 
reached levels that would have been un- 
thinkable just a few years ago. The United 
States has built housing for former Soviet 
missile controllers. Pentagon officials now- 
give virtually the same briefing on U.S. 
nuclear policy to Russia's Parliament as 
they give to Congress. Unfortunately. 
Washington has not yet given equal atten- 
tion to the need to' downsize Moscow's 
non-nuclear forces. U.S. cooperation is 
essential to reduce Russia’s army to a level 
that Russia and its neighbors can live with. 

Russia currently has 1.1 million people 
under arms, ft cannot afford to maintain a 
force that size. Draft-dodging has reached 
epidemic proportions as recruits recognize 
that the army cannot provide them three 
square meals a day. never mind a timely 
paycheck. Yet even with its defense spend- 
ing in free fall and arms procurements 
near a standstill. Moscow's defense bill 
still drives up its budget deficit, and threat- 
ens new inflationary pressures. 

To generations that grew up fearing the 
Soviet threat, that may sound like good 
news. Yet while the armed forces must 
shrink, letting them collapse uncontrolla- 
bly is risky. A collapse would put thou- 
sands of troops on the street, freeing 
ihem to engage in mischief in newly inde- 
pendent republics. It would also embitter 
career officers and help fuel a nationalist 
resurgence. The obvious course is for 
Russia to reduce its armed forces in an 
orderly way. But even that will meet 


strong political resistance unless the 
United States takes concrete steps to re- 
assure Russia about its security. 

Russia's vaunted air defenses, for ex- 
ample. have sprung leaks. The Defense 
Ministry may thus be tempted to keep 
more fighter planes than it can afford. 
The United Slates could ease Russian 
fears by offering to integrate Moscow 
into the Western air traffic control net- 
work. It could also invest in housing and 
job training for officers mustered out of 
the armed forces — much as it has invest- 
ed in those who manned Russia’s nuclear 
arsenaL That would help minimize the 
prospect of a nation full of unemployed 
and potentially unruly soldiers. 

Above all. the West should resist any 
immediate temptation to include Poland 
and the rest of Eastern Europe in an 
expanded NATO. Russian military plan- 
ners are certain to view any such expan- 
sion as a serious regional threat and will be 
even less inclined to shrink their forces. 

No U.S. official is better positioned to 
encourage a broadened dialogue on Rus- 
sia’s conventional forces than the chair- 
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General 
John Sbalikashvili. In the aftermath of 
Vietnam, when morale in America's armed 
forces hit bottom, he tasted the bitterness 
that the Russian army is now experienc- 
ing. He further understands the risks of an 
expanded NATO — a move that would 
commit his troops to the defense of East- 
ern Europe but inspire a recidivist back- 
lash in Russia. He should take the lead in 
discussing a Russian military build-down. 

- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Clinton and Indonesia 


It has become the practice — and a 
good one — for the human rights groups 
to piggyback on summits and big interna- 
tional conferences to press their special 
cause. Right now the focus is on the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting 
about to open in Indonesia. Its military- 
chosen government sees a prime opportu- 
nity to show off economic growth and 
foreign policy stability. President Su- 
harto may hope that the economic decla- 
rations coming out of Bogor will lend- him 
the statesmanlike glow that his predeces- 
sor President Sukarno took on as a father 
of the nonaligned movement at Bandung 
in 1955. It is the right moment for the 
thousands of officials and onlookers to 
ask about the price that has been paid for 
the progress claimed. 

In fact, Indonesia has co mmi tted what 
Amnesty International calls a “pattern of 
systematic human rights violations” over 
the years. The calling of the Bogor con- 
ference may have aggravated the offense: 
independent labor unions and peaceful 
dissidents have been swept up. In the last 
year, Indonesia has tiptoed up to, and 
then fled from, a limited experiment in 
political “openness.” Its return to a more 
repressive leadership style was marked by 
the banning of three unintimidated pub- 
lications last June. 

Whatever rationale for hard-line rule 


was invoked in more parlous times, there 
can be no good justification for Mr. Su- 
harto's reversion to authoritarian type 
now. Growth has created a middle class 
that is demanding the political privileges 
appropriate to a modernizing society. 
The banned papers were offering a check 
on official conduct and corruption — a 
high value in a country whose House of 
Representatives is mostly a rubber 
stamp. The papers were also giving voice 
to Indonesia’s newly threatened “non- 
government organizations.” These con- 
stitute the makings of a bottom-up civil 
society — again, a high value in a country 
where authority is commonly asserted 
from the top down. 

The United States provided the secret 
support in the name of anti-communism 
that then General Suharto used to muscle 
aside President Sukarno in the 1960s. 
Later Washington enabled Indonesia, 
which it saw as a strategic partner, to 
illegally swallow the former Portuguese 
colony of East Timor, which it holds and 
represses to this day. Their past closeness 
adds an edge of obligation to the plain 
American interest in seeing an important 
and friendly Asian country swing onto a 
democratic path. President Bill Clinton, 
his Asian eye so far on commerce, has a 
chance to show he understands. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 
ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co* Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher £ Chief Excatiiw 
JOHN VtNOCUR. Execute Editor &. Vgx President 

• WALTER WELLS. Afew E&or • SAMUEL ABT, KATHERINE KNORRand 
CHARLES MIlCHEIMtStED^uy&SfWi* CARLGEWKTZ.Asra^ffifiBr 

• ROBERT!. DONAHUE Editor cf Ae E&orial Pages • JONATHAN GAGE Business aid Fmance Edik).- 

• REN£ BONDY, Deputy Publisher* JAMES McLEOD. Advertising Dbraar 

• JUANITA LCASPARI,frri»»ettit»MlDewfafBwrfDim3Hr* ROBERT FARRE Cira^mm Director. Eurtf* 

DmCKurdelaPidriiOiaMlIkhaMD.SBrBnm 
Director Adjoint <k k Pubticaion: Katharine P. Damn 


Iriorulia^HaaM Tribune. 181 Avenue GaricS'deGailk. 9252 1 Ncuilh'-sw-Sdnc. Ranee. 
TcL : 1 1 J 4&37.93JOO. Rax : Cue, 4637.0&5 1 . Adv,46J7.51 1 1 Imwnrt: IHTe’ftnt^tomjc 

Editor (nr Aar Afiduri Rkhmbcn. 5 Caaeibury Rd, Sfogupm 851 I. TeL (65) 472-7T6&. Far (65) 274-21# 
UtK. Dir. ,tiu MD. KranepuH 50 duuxUer Rd. Htng King, TeL OZ-fCC-HItt Fur 852-9222-im 
Ghl Mgr. Gentian: T. Schther, i riednehstr. 15. 60323 Frwijan/M TeL (ftWj 72 67 55. Far 1060 ) 72 73 10 
PnxVS.: HidxxiOmv. 850 1 SMAve. Nto Yak N.Y. 10021 TeL 12121 752-JfMl Fac (212) 755-5785 
U.K. Office: 63 Umg Acre, Union WC2. Tfi. (071) &J6-4H02. Fax : \07J) 240-2254. 

■5/1. an capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanterre B 732021 126. Commission Pariiaire No. 6 1337 
/W, bsemamJ Hendd Tribwe. All rbfiB rescued. ISSN - OZM-XUSl 



Voters at a Loss for Lack of a Blueprint 


VS7ASHINGTON — American voters on 

Y V Tuesday will be searching for many 
things: tax cuts, better and more efficient 
government, and the satisfaction of ousting 
old bums and picking new ones. But these 
elections will also link Americans to voters 
around the world who seek a new ideology 
to explain their complex lives and soften 
their frustrations. 

That may not seem immediately obvious. 
Midterm elections usually turn on local is- 
sues and personalities. The mean-spirited 
campaign that hasjast ended seemed espe- 
cially lacking in signposts that point to a 
renewal of ideology as a driving force in 
American politics. 

Explanations for the heavy losses the 
Democrats are. expected to register in the 
House, Senate and governors' mansions 
range from tired blood to the Hillary and 
BUI Effect. But the Democrats would not go 
into a dark night of electoral bloodbath 
alone. The stunning losses suffered by the 
majority parties in national legislatures else- 
where in the past 18 months suggest that 
something larger is at work. 

Helmut Kohl’s conservative coalition in 
Germany went from a 66-seat margin in the 
Bundestag to a very shaky 10-vote advan- 
tage after elections last month. In France 
last year the Socialists were downsized by 
voters from 270 seats and power in the 
National Assembly on election day to 34 
seats and insignificance the day after. 

Canada’s national election a year ago was 
an ultimate wipeout. The ruling Conserva- 
tive Party lost 132 of its 134 seats. In Japan 
and Italy, parlies that had ruled since World 
War II not only lost power but also lost their 
identities. Even in the new democracies of 
Eastern Europe and Russia, sourness and 
disappointment have brought electoral re- 
versals for the heroes of the revolutions. 

Each of these elections had its own char- 
acteristics and individual turning points, as 
does each race in Tuesday’s U.S. balloting. 
But if the Democrats do suffer heavy losses, 
there will be new grounds on Wednesday for 
believing that a general crisis of confidence 
in government exists in the world’s most 
important industrial democracies. 

Why should this be so five years after the 
Berlin Wall came down, four years after the 
Soviet Union began to implode, three years 
after George Bush boasted that America had 
“kicked the Vietnam syndrome” in the Gulf 
War, two years after an American economic 
recovery began to gather steam, one year 
after Washington signed trade agreements 


By Jim Hoagtand 

ensuring a more prosperous future with Can- 
ada, Mexico and the rest of the world? 

These events were hailed as vindications 
of the West’s resolve and ideological superi- 
ority. Logically, voters should be showering 
politicians who had a role in producing such 
change with lifetime contracts and big lim- 
os. Instead the pels are being shown the 
door with what seems to be unprecedented 
bitterness and haste. What gives? 

Part of the explanation of this trans- 
national frustration with the "ins” lies in the 
loss of global ideology that accompanied 
these triumphs — the loss of the predictable 
way of looking at the world provided by the 
comfortable, largely unexamined ideas 
about ami-communism at home and abroad 
that expired with the Cold War’s end. 

The end of ideology was a liberating event 
for those imprisoned in the Soviet tyranny. 
They lived with an acute realization not 
always remembered in the West: The main 
purpose of ideology is to deny reality — to 
explain away what cannot be explained. 

Ideological beliefs obscure the obvious 
contradictions and frustrations of change 
and everyday life as well as the big political 
lies of those whose only concern is to keep 
power. Ideology helps explain away what 


we see with our own eyes. That was a 
gigantic and ultimately impossible task 
within the Soviet system, which cracked 
under its weight- . - . 

In America, ideological illusions haw 
been much milder and less damaging. But it 
would be a mistake to assume that they have 
not played a key role in American politics. 

As Ronald Reagan expanded government 
s pending and budget deficits to record lev- 
els, it became more and more necessary for 
him to attack those two practices. Both 
parties were more comfortable debating 
suoply-ade economics in the Reagan years 
than acknowledging that America, in that 
firm* of laissez-faire policy and personal 
aw pnd tiwT ia^ , was giving birth to an urban 
subproletariat whose members are unlikely 
to ever find jobs or be abie to avoid .the 
temptation of crime. 

Without the large ideology of global con- 
flict to put wind in their sails, George Bush 
and then Bfli Clinton failed to define a larger 
purpose that would give voters a reason to 
overlook the frustrations of modem life. This 
is true for Congress and many other govern- 
mental institutions in America and abroad.' 

The chickens of voter vengeance have 
come home to roost overseas. They are like- 
ly to be moving toward the American chick- 
en coop on Tuesday. 

The Washington Past. 



Americans, Too, Can Clean Up the Campaigning 


P ARIS — I suppose this is a 
hopeless cause, but in an 
election season anything can 
happen, and certainly this year’s 
has been die most sordid Ameri- 
can election campaign yeL 
Americans do not have to put 
up with this. There is a way to 
change political campaigns for 
the better: by eliminating paid 
political advertising on television 
and radio. Nearly every other de- 
mocracy bans it and enforces an 
impartial use of the airwaves by 
candidates and parties. 

The United States is the only 
serious democracy that allows 
its politics to be dominated by a 
system that compels people to 
raise hundreds of thousands of 
dollars — sometimes millions — 
in order to have a chance to be 
elected to public office. 

' The system corrupts and de- 
means candidates, corrupts the 
political system because of the 
influence it gives to those who 
contribute the money, and cor- 
rupts the debate by driving out 
the discussion of issues, substi- 
tuting emotional appeals, image- 
m ongoing and character assassi- 
nation — the last a particular 
feature of this year's campaigns. 

A recent analysis by the non- 
p artisan Center for Responsive 
Politics notes a huge shift in 
corporate political contribu- 
tions tins year from the Republi- 
can to the Democratic Party. 
This obviously is not caused bv 
a rush of admiration for Bui 
Clinton and the 
administration. 


By William Pfaff 


.lion for Bi 
icies of his 
ut by these 


companies' wish to place the 
governing party in their debt 
particularly in making appoint- 
ments to regulatory agencies. 

The biggest contributions are 
from companies in the tightly 
regulated Fields of energy, tele- 
communications. agriculture, 
and banking and finance. 

The advantage that the pre- 
sent system gives not only to 
special interests but to incum- 
bents is obvious, at a lime when 
there is a massive ( if not particu- 
larly rational) movement of vot- 
er opinion against incumbents. 

The argument also is made 
that this system provides office- 
holders with an unconstitutional 
advantage, since no challenger 
can expect to enjoy the same 
cash favors from special inter- 
ests as the man already in Wash- 
ington, or in the state legislature 
or slatehouse. It certainly is a 
system which defies the spirit of 
the American constitutional sys- 
tem, in which citizens (and candi- 
dates) are supposed to be equal. 

Money corruption is a factor 
in all democracies, as currently 
or recently and blatantly is dem- 
onstrated in Italy, France. Brit- 
ain and Japan. But why must 
Americans positively encourage 
corruption by the way they run 
their elections? Paid political 
broadcasts should be banned. 

A system of equitably distrib- 
uted broadcast time for rival 
candidates and parties should 
be substituted. Nearly everyone 


else in the democratic world 
does tins. Why can't America? 

In principle, one would think 
that this time should be contrib- 
uted by broadcasters and cable 
companies as part of their pub- 
lic service obligation, but that 
undoubtedly is too much to ask. 
The time wfll have to be paid for 
from public funds. Since the cost 
of campaigns will have drastical- 
ly been reduced by this reform, 
together with the consequent de- 
mands on federal matching mon- 
ey, the public will undoubtedly 
still come out ahead. 

Certainly the present system 
amounts to a machine for trans- 
ferring the public funds granted 
candidates into the bank ac- 
counts of the broadcasting com- 
panies. Thai, of coarse, is one 
reason the opposition to what I 
propose is so virulent. 

The benefits of reform none- 
theless are dear. The influence 
of special-interest campaign con- 
tributors and political action 
committees would be greatly re- 
duced. The power of lobbyists in 
Washington and in the state 
capitals would be cut, as they 
would no longer hold a money 
threat over officeholders. The 
political field would be opened 
up to new candidates. 

Television would be depol- 
luted during campaign time. 
Journalists would be forced to 
slop covering campaigns as 
campaigns and go back to cov- 
ering politicians as politidans 


— and even to discussing issues. 

There is something more that 
could be done. There could be 
rules about what goes into a po- 
litical broadcast Certain kinds 
of appeals could be banned. The 
emotionally loaded image could 
be excluded. Politicians could be 
forced to talk to voters in their 
broadcasts, be interviewed, de- 
bate one another, be challenged. 

No doubt this would make 
the campaigns much more bor- 
ing than now, but in the gover- 
nance of a democracy, boring 
reality would seem preferable to 
fiction, fantasy and fabrication. 

No doubt this reform would 
also be attacked as limiting free 
speech. But it would in fact en- 
courage and even require free 
speech, in place of lying images 
and demagogic manipulation. 

If politicians and pundits can 
seriously talk about term limits, 
which solve nothing, or mandat- 
ed budget balancing, which is 
economic nonsense, or any oth- 
er half-baked nostrum in cur- 
rent American public debate, we 
can certainly talk about install- 
ing the campaign rules and limi- 
tations that prevail in most of 
the rest of the democratic world. 

We can eliminate a practice 
that most of the world’s demo- 
cratic citizens see as a scandal- 
ous subversion of representative 
government, benefiting only 
demagogy and special interest 
Who among America’s politi- 
cians would take the lead? 

International Herald Tribune. 

I jos Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Mandela Has a Duty to Rehabilitate His Young Lions 


B ERKELEY, California — The 
recent conviction of three 
young men in South Africa for the 
kflfing of Amy Biehl, a white 
American student who had ven- 
tured into the black township of 
Guguletu, points to a question 
hanging over the future of the 
country. Politicized youth were 
once in the vanguard of the st 
gle against apartheid. Where 
they fit into the new South Africa? 

fin a speech early this year, Nel- 
son Mandela lamented the trans- 
formation of what Us African Na- 
tional Congress called “young 
lions.” “The youth in the town- 
ships have had over the decades a 
visible enemy, the government. 
Now that enemy is no longer visi- 
ble because of die transformation 
that is taking place. Their enemy is 
now you and me — people who 
drive a car and have a house.” 

Yet it was the African National 
Congress which recruited town- 
ship youth in the first place — 
into campaigns that kept them 
out of school and in the streets. 

When the revolution succeed- 
ed, the young revolutionaries 
were swept aside. Old enough to 
fight, they were told that they 
were not old enough to vote, and 
Mr. Mandela's rariy campaign 
promise to lower the voting age to 
14 was forgotten. These young 
men are now widely referred to as 
a lost generation. Some, such as 
the killers of Amy Biehl, have 
turned to spontaneous violence. 

The problem is severe. Since 
the presidential election last 
AnriL there have been reports of 


By Nancy Scheper-Hnghes 


brutal attacks by youth gangs and 
others not against those who col- 
laborated with the police, as in 
the past, but against suspected 
witches, thieves or anyone per- 
ceived as an enemy. 

The murder of Amy Biehl. in 
August 1993, and the black-on- 
black violence are part of the same 
phenomenon: renegade forms of 
popular justice that developed in 
opposition to apartheid. 

In the townships and squatter 
camps, “people’s courts” and dis- 
cipline committees have long sub- 
stituted for government-adminis- 
tered law. Local committees 
punish infractions from drunken- 
ness and disorderly conduct to 
collaboration with the police. 

Punishments include public 
apologies, fines, community ser- 
vice and house arrest More seri- 
ous crimes might be punished by 
Hogging, ritual mutilation, ban- 
ishment or even — for suspected 
informers — the gasoline-soaked 
burning tire called the necklace. 

In the heat of the moment 
popular justice is sometimes de- 
railed by volatile impromptu acts 
of vengeance meted out by angry 
mobs, self-appointed vigilantes 
and gang members. Yet the two 
must not be confused: the town- 
ship councils and committees 
represent genuine local gover- 
nance and self -determination. 

While doing research in the 
squatter camps of the Western 
Cape. I was often impressed by 
the thniiphifnl And re«3»onsible 


manner of the young men in- 
volved in community policing. 

Last February, for example, in 
the Chris Hani camp, several ac- 
tivist youths, representing the 
ANC and radical student organi- 
zations, intervened when an an- 
gry mob gathered around three 
boys caught stealing 400 rand 
(about SI 23) from a local saloon 
owner. At considerable risk to 
themselves, the young men nego- 
tiated to reduce the demand for 
necklacing the thieves to SO lashes 
with a buUwhip. 

Although the flogging was 
harsh, the young thieves survived. 
Two of them later went through 
Xbosa initiations and became 
fully accepted adults in the com- 
munity. Nothing more was said 
of their infraction. 

And many young activists in 
the camps are urging their com- 
munities to explore alternatives 
to corporal punishment. 

One thing is certain. The ANC 
should accept some responsibility 
for the politicized and angry 
youth and for the existence of 
these informal but essentially 
democratic local forums, and find 
ways for harnessing them. 

ft might be possible, for exam- 
ple, to turn the people’s courts 
into more formal bodies, and to 
negotiate standards for commu- 
nity policing and punishment. 

And Mr. Mandela’s govern- 
ment will have to find a better 
way to reach out to township 
YOUth It ic « Hnnrfnl sifcn that 


Judge Gerald Friedman rejected 
the death penalty for Amy Biehl’s 
assailants, in the belief that they 
might someday become useful 
citizens of the new South Africa. 


The writer, a professor of an- 
thropology at the University of Cal- 
ifornia, taught social anthropology 
at the University of Cepe Town 
from July 1993 to July 1994. She 
contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


The Pacific" 
As One Big 
Market? 

By Hobart Rowen 

W ashington— P resident 

Bill Clinton goes to Indone- 
sia next week for a summit with 
Asian leaders, amid optimism 
about the creation of a huge liq- 
uation free trade zone. 

A vision of a powerful Pacific 
economic community has been 
gaming strength since the incep- 
tion five years ago of the Asian- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation 
movement, the forum for Mr. 
Clinton’s presence in Indonesia. 

Advocacy of an Asia-Pacific 
free trade area has been strongly 
influenced by a 24-member “Em- 
inent Persons Group” chaired by 
the American economist C. Fred 
Bergstea, who believes that a free 
trade area would especially bene- 
fit the United States, giving it 
access to huge markets. 

The idea has been pushed by 
Indonesian President Suharto, 
who wants to take APEC faster 
into an operational mode thanj 
many of his fellow Asians. * 
Mr. Bergsten proposes that ne- 
gotiations for a free trade area 
begin in 2000 and conclude no 
later than 2020 for the least devel- 
oped nations. Japan and the 
United States would scrap ail 
their barrios by 2010. 

For some in America, free, 
open trade with Asia ruses the 
specter of cheap goods that would 
cost American jobs. 

Is the Bergs ten /Suharto pres- 
sure for an Asia-Pacific free trade 
zone too ambitious? The question 
is raised by Paula Stem, former 
chair of the International Trade 
Commission and a longtime dev- 
otee of the idea that Asia will be 
the dominant economic force in 
the 21st century. 

In two recent private debates in 
Washington (one at the Heritage 
Foundation, the other at a State 
Department forum), Ms. Stem 
argued that a sounder trade poli- 
cy toward Asia would be to pur- 
sue a slower, “budding block” ap- 
proach aimed at achieving 
“concrete, achievable goals to 
transform APEC into a regional 
framework for enhancing trade.” 

She would try to “lock in” easi- 
er-to-reach agreements on indi- 
vidual sectors. What must be dem- 
onstrated, die says, is that free 
trade with Asia ‘Is not simply $ 
threat to American producers.” 

Ms. Stem takes the pragmatic 
view that raising the issue of free 
trade at the meeting in Indonesia 
could give American opponents 
of GATT legislation one more 
tool with which to fight passage 
of the global treaty. 

The whole idea that there is a 
definable Pacific community is “a 
myth,” she says. She contends 
that although the Asian bloc has 
awesome economic power, it is 
fragile because of the lack of cul- 
tural cohesion. 

Mr. Beigsten tells me he is baf- 
fled by criticism from Ms. Stem, 
with whom he has worked closely 
in the past All the “building- 
block” short-term approaches she 
recommends, he says, were first 
developed by his group. He does 
not see why the “building block” 
tactic and a free trade vision can’t 
work together, in tandem. 

“Moreover, 1 reject the idea of 
an Asian culuiral-divide,” he told 
me. “The forces that pull them 
apart are overcame by a stronger 
commonality of interests.” 

There are two overriding rea- 
sons why Asians want a strong 
APEC and ultimately a free trade 
area, Mr. Bergsten said. First, 
despite huge intra-Asian com- 
merce, the Asian nations still 
have an enormous dependence 
on the North American market; 
and they want more North 
American investment. They see a 
free trade zone as insurance 
against U.S. protectionism. 

“Second, on the security side: * 
Most of the smaller nations want 
to keep us engaged in Asia as the 
countervailing power to an enor- 
mously growing China. They’re 
scared to death of China becom- 
ing the dominant power in Asia.” 

However, as Ms. Stern sug- 
gests, there is little yet to indi- 
cate that the American public, 
almost tom apart by the pros- 
pect of free trade with tiny Mexi- 
co, will buy into free trade with 
the big poor nations of Asia. At 
least, any time soon. 

The Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1094; Editor Sentenced 

PARIS — [The Herald says in an 
editorial. J There arc limits to the 
liberty of the Press, as the editor 
of a Parisian Radi co- Socialist 
newspaper has just learnt to his 
cost. He has been sentenced by 
the Jury of the Seine to a year's 
imprisonment, the maximum 
penalty for insulting and defam- 
ing the President of the Republic. 
The jurymen would have forgiven 
insults penned by a journalist in 
the beat of press polemics, but the 
moment it became a question of 
principle, they were stem. The 
verdict is universally approved, 

1919: Care lor Cancer? 

BUENOS AIRES — Medical cir- 
cles here are discussing the discov- 
ery of a plant which seems to give 
curative effects in cases of cancer. 
The remedy is applied by means of 
.subcutaneous injections. A oaoer 


on the subject will shortly be read 
to the Academy of Medicine. 

1944s Americans Vote 

NEW YORK — {From our 
New York edition :] American 
voters elect a President today 
[Nov. 7] in the first war-time Pres- 
idential election since that of 
1 864 in the midst of the civil war. 
Leaders of the two major parties 
stock determinedly to tiiar pre- 
dictions of victory for President 
Roosevelt or for Governor Thom- 
as E. Dewey. The President and 
Governor Dewey brought their 
campaigns to an end with radio 
talks last night. Mr. Roosevelt ap- 9 
pealed for a heavy popular vote as 
a test of democratic processes, 
saying, “I do not want to talk to 
you tonight of partisan politics, 
urn political battle is finished.” 
Governor Dewey, however, con- 
tinued his fervent appeal for 
vnips in the final hour. 


l± 3 t 








F-._ . 

■ ■ “'If- 

Hina .. '*’ P 

& 

“'^C- 


“ «'■? i «. ; 


®r.' 

n-,. 


! ir._ . U * 

.V 

Jc 

^ k; 


KW i 

C ' Rlif:-.^ 


I-Sf. -.. 

out 

r;_ 


° = Hu. ij 
Vl Zhi/! 


:: T.v^- 


• T vr : . 


■= :c>. 

■’■' l ?Us" 

*:'J>.. .. 




’ ^ - 1 -' >".V # 

• ;• i 


v : ^ v ; 


. Fiittf* 


r. 


line*-. 

to* 


t&O 



fit- 



Page 7 


•v 


Hard Tests Ahead in Angola and Mozambique 


% Paul Taylor 

^“fringflwr />tw Sernce 

...JOHANNESBURG — The 
miuafing of a peace accord in 
Angola and the completion of a 
democratic election in Mozam- 
bique, have brought cautious 
hope for stability to the last 
oncosts of Cold War, mart- 
bfld-era conflict in southern 
Africa. ■ 

But the two former Portu- 
guese- colonies, where 1.5 mfl- 
hon people lost their fives in 
awl wars that began after inde- 
peodence in 1975 , ^ face 
dauntrag challenges to secure 
their fragile peace and revive 
their devastated economies. 

The situation is especially di- 
cey m Angola, where progress 
at the peace table has been ac- 
companied by' an increase in 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


fighting throughout the coun- 
tiy. There have been reports of 
heavy fig h t i n g between the gov- 
ernment forces and the rebel 
movement UNITA outside its 
stronghold of Huambo, in the 
northeastern oil town of Soyo 
and in the northwestern dia- 
mond mining area erf Cacolo. 

Analysts said they expected 
the grabbing for territory to 
pontinue right up to the hoped- 
for formal s igning of the peace 
accord in mid-November, and 
Perhaps beyond. “These two 

sides really don’t trust each oth- 
er,” one Westen diplomat said 

Even so, the positive diplo- 
matic developments of the past 
week in Angola and Mozam- 
bique indicate that there has 
been a domino effect to the de- 
mocratization that began in this 
part of the world when the 
Communist empire collapsed in 
1989, and culminated with the 
transformation to black major- 
ity rule in Sooth Africa this past 
April. 

Now, a newly democratic 
South Africa has provided the 
two countries with a role model 
for a negotiated resolution of 
conflict, as well as a diplomatic 
nudge whenever former com- 
batants have lost their way on 
Lhe road to democracy. 

When Afonso Dhlakama, a 



Joa>*TrifidaJr'A£M>rc Francc-P»cuc 

An Angolan carrying a tub of water past booses laid waste in government-rebel fighting 


leader of the former rebel group 
Renamo, called for a boycott on 
the eve of Mozambique voting, 
he found himself under intense 
diplomatic pressure not only 
from the United Nations and 
the Western powers that fi- 
nanced the peace process; but 
$Iso from regional leaders like 


President Robot Mugabe of 
Zimbabwe and Smith Africa's 
deputy president, Thabo 
Mbdri. Mr. Dhlakama rescind- 
ed the boycott within a day. 

“A few years ago. this sort 
unified regional pressure was 
impossible/* said Richard 
Cornwell, an analyst with the 
Africa Institute of South Afri- 
ca. “Now you have South Afri- 
ca at peace with its neighbors, 
letting Dhlakama know that 
unless he sees the election 
through, he’s out in the wilder- 
ness.” 


The voting proceeded peace- 
fully, but Mozambique is not 
woods. 1 


yet out erf the woods. United 
Nations monitors say sample 
returns show that President 
Joaquim Chissano will win with 
about 55 percent of the vote. 
The official count will not be 
available for two weeks. It re- 
mains to be seen if Mr. Dhla- 
kama will accept the result, or if 
Mr. Chissano will offer him or 
other members of Renamo po- 
sitions in a unity government. 

The model of first-time de- 
mocracy being governed bv a 


coalition of historic rivals has 
proved to be a winner through- 
out southern Africa — witness 
South Africa, Malawi and. after 
a post-independence tribal war, 
Zimbabwe. 

“The experience in this pan 
of the world." Mr. Cornwell 
said, “suggests that where you 
have deep racial tribal or re- 
gional differences, it makes all 
the sense to give all groups a 
piece of the action." 

Even if Mr. Dhlakama were 
to claim that the election was 
fraudulent, no one believes 


Lust, greed, envy, hate, 

love, joy— 

evervtning in life is there. 

And that’s 


ythi 


just Charlie Brown. 


' If you’re going to subscribe to an international newspaper, think what you’re 
getting into Endless worrying about fluctuations in the Bohemian Thaler? Or 
yet another article about Vita Sackville West? Or Virginia Woolf? If you prefer 
concise yet comprehensive reporting that gives you a broad, clear, 
uncomplicated view of the worlds of politics, business, art, science, sports and 
- yes - a little more fun, then the International Herald Tribune is your best 
bet. Our trial offer -giving you all this for as little as half the newsstand 
price - makes it a certain winner ! 


New Subscriber Offer 


Majt or tex to: tntemalionaJ Herald Tribune. 

' 181. avenue Cbartefrde-Gaofle. 92521 Neuffly Cectex, France. 
For full information; Fax (+33-1) 46 37 06 51 


. ■ . ! " : 


12montfts 

+ 2 mooths 

FREE 


3 months 
+2 weeks 

FREE 

1 : • .. ...... - 

' '|. i Countty/Currency 

SAVINGS 

fortyoif 

t j Austria V. 

A. Sch. 

6,000 

’ 37 V 

1,800 

J 'Belgium .. 

B.Fr. 

14,000 

■ “ 3 S.' :: 

4,200 

Denmark - . 

P.Kf. 

3,400 

.. 33 

1,050 

tj'Fayw. 

’ VF-F. 

1,950 

;.:.40 

590 

| 4 &fnwnjr 

■6K 

700 

az : - 

210 

' | \ Gteai Britain 

£ 

210 

-32 

65 

• ! : L iraiafto - ~ 

a a 

230 

37 

68 

: | Wr 

Lire 

470 , MO 

50 

145,000 

-i-f 

j. ; jJBwrt»urg ; 

| ; Wetoestands . .. 

UFi. 

14,000 

38 

4.200 

Fl 

770 

40 

230 

-Keprtu^..-/-- 

Esc. 

47,000 

38 

14,000 

Ptas. 

4&000 

34 

14.500 

: L-^waW^-AiseSta Pias 

55.000 

24 

14.500 

' | J :S»«dBh labmjatf) 

• 

S.Kr. 

3.100 

34 

900 

V SMr.j 
S.F f-.j 

3,500 

re 

1.000 


510 | 

44 j 

IBS 1 


Yes, I want to start receiving toe International Herald Tribune every day 
The’subsalption term I prefer is (check box): 

□ 12 months (+ 2 months free). 

□ 3 months (+ 2 weeks free). 

□ My check is enclosed (payable to the international Herald Tribune). 

□ Please charge my: d American Express 3 Diners Club □ VISA 

□ Access 


T 

I 


□ MasterCard □ Eurocard 


Card No.. 


Credit card charges wi« be made in French Francs at current exchange rales. | 

I 
I 

I 

I 


Exp. date 


Signature. 


For business orders, please indicate your YAI number. 


(JUT VAT number FH 4732021 1261 1 

o Mr. □ Mrs. □ Ms. 
Family name 


First name 
Mailing Address: 


n Home eBusiness 


City/Code 


Country 


TeL 


Fax 


7-11-94 


TWalhrJgSribune 


I 

I 

1 

I 

I 

I 


■I 


■ ■mm im m mi* W« 


■nos mb in »ua*iw raa 


I 


Renamo poses enough of a mili- 
tary threat to plunge the coun- 
try back into war. The more 
realistic danger is from bandit- 
ry and ungovernability. Mo- 
zambique is a desperately poor 
nation, with 80 percent of its 
economy consisting or donor 
aid. It has tens of thousands of 
unemployed soldiers, and they 
have tens of thousands of guns. 

“Even if the election is a suc- 
cess, Lhe real work in Mozam- 
bique has just begun," said 
Greg Mills, director of studies 
at the South Africa Institute for 
International Affairs. 

In Angola, the prospect of 
war remains a threat and will 
continue to be a threat even if 
President Jose Eduardo dos 
Santos and Jonas Savimbi, 
leader of the National Union 
for lhe Total Independence of 
Angola, or UNITA, meet later 
this month as planned to sign 
the accord their negotiators ini- 
tialed in Zambia on OcL 31. 

The accord calls for a coali- 
tion government to be created 
at the national provincial and 
local level along with a unified 
army and police force. It would 
give vice-presidential status to 
Mr. Savimbi, and calls for a 
second round of presidential 
elections to be held. 

Mr. dos Santos won the first 
round, in September 1992, but 
with just under 50 percent of 
the vote. Mr. Savimbi who re- 
ceived 40 percent, claimed the 
dec lion was stolen and re- 
turned to war. 

There are several danger 
points stiD on the horizon in 
Angola, starting with Mr. Sa- 
vimbi himself. He is a oversized 
figure, the object of great ado- 
ration and great haired. Not 
without reason, he sees himself 
as a constant target of would-be 
assassins. For reasons spanning 
from ego to security, analysts 
say, it is difficult seeing him 
playing a constructive role in a 
unity government. 

Peace accord or not, the dis- 
trust between the two sides is so 
great that most observers think 
it will take a United Nations 
peacekeeping force of at least 
7.000 troops — the figure called 
for in the accord — to enforce a 
cease-fire and demobilization. 


Rwanda: The Fire Next Time 

To Prevent New Slaughter, UN Urges International Force 


By Raymond Bonner 

yea- York Times Service 

KIGALI, Rwanda — United Nations offi- 
cials say that if Rwanda is to be spared 
another war. an international force must be 


sent quickly to the refugee camps in Zaire, 
soldiers 


where observers say soldiers and militiamen 
of the former Rwandan government are in- 
creasing their preparedness for war. 

Forces of the former government are al- 
ready making regular incursions into Rwanda 
and in some instances have ambushed the 
new government’s soldiers, the commander of 
the UN troops here, Major General Guy 
Tonsignant, said in an interview. 

As the former array continues to regroup 
and regain its strength, with food being sup- 
plied by the international community, the 
attacks are likely to increase in number and in 
military efficiency. General Tousignant said. 

He said three battalions — about 2,100 
soldiers — were needed to provide security in 
the camps in Zaire and disarm the former 
army, 

Washington is lobbying within the Security 
Council for the deployment of a large force, 
said a senior UN official But the official said 
he did not know what the United States was 
offering in the way of troops, money or mate- 
riel. 

General Tousignant’s assessment was 
shared by other senior UN officials. 

“We are sitting on a volcano ” the organi- 


zation's ranking official in Rwanda, Shahyar 
Khan, said before leaving for Geneva, where 
the rapidly deteriorating security situation 
will be discussed in a meeting Tuesday called 
by Secretary-General Butros Butros Ghali. 

Mr. Khan, the secretary-general’s special 
representative in Rwanda, said he would like 
to see a commando force of about 500 sent to 
Zaire immediately. 

The mission of an international force 
would be to disarm the regular army and 
militia of the former government and to move 
the soldiers, who are thought to number 
30,000. into camps farther from the border. 

The international force would also provide 
security in the camps so that refugees who 
wanted to return would be able to do so. 
Many refugees have been prevented from 
returning because of threats from the former 
government’s militia, whose members now 
control the camps. 

The Zairian government has promised on 
several occasions that it will disarm the for- 
mer army and move it from the camps, as well 
as prohibit political activity in the camps by 
officials of the former government 

Soldiers wearing camouflage uniforms 
swagger through the camps, and they train in 
nearby forests. They still have most of their 
weapons, from rifles to artillery pieces, mili- 
tary vehicles and even three helicopters, 
which they took with them when they fled. 



NOVEMBER II-13 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14 

NOV. 26 & 27 (850 ajn. to 1230 pjn.) 

‘MONEY IS MY FRIEND" 

Seminar about Money with PHIL LAUT. author c4 
best-sterol (hat title 

Rare c^pvrunrty 10 wrk wrth this leading fipiie 
m personal dewfepiiient. 3nd leatn tow u> 

— Mow lanyard vthcnJ internal mrtflkt 
—Tale charge dyaurmcthraOon 
— trowbfihg emotions 

— Access your inner creative gant 

— Matte and any out realistic plans 
—Saw and invest 

— Earn enough mcney demg ivha you tow. 

And much more 

Cmurr Pad Saelgrovt Park 42 S4 30 32 
PoByPrewett Parts 40 35 17 81 

Insurance Professionals 

Who Provide Financial Products. Services 
& Advice to US Exponates 
lohn Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. is 
pleased to announce its recent acceptance 
by the Life Assurance and Unit Thist 
Regulator Or&nisaticn (Lautro) 
Seminar introducing lohn Hancodfs finan- 
aal strength, products and seiWces 

300- W» p m -' Tlte Regent London 

222 Marylefcone Rd -Mary leboneTtJ be Step 
Cafl or 6a Terrance F. CInne. CLU 
Regional VP, FMrfidd, CT USA 

TeL; 203-331-0616 Flax; 203-331-OblO 

WORLD ENERGIE INDEX 

GeneraJ inreresi brutlatiw 
ro be hefd at the Nice taopofs. Fiance 
Ennarce fee indudes the program 
reserved seat, badland subsequent report. 
Limited number of plans 

Mamede Tribune ZSXj f Lecn^ers 1 700 F 

Congressmen 1 600 F General public 250 F 

Assocabens 1WF Students 80T 

Resenottoos by fax (331 83 27 09 3 1 
and by malt 

Secretarto EVALORATECSCH Expertises 
BP 55, 54602 VHIes-Les-Naaqr Cedes 
FRANCE. TeL (33) 83 28 31 08. 

PARIS 

LONDON 

NICE 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


m 

01)40 

IBS': 


INTI 


MOVING 


KGS. PAHS (33.1)40 60 ^)40 
A.OS. 10*C0N^81)%I 7595 
KGS. BMJS5BS fc-2) 5?4 25 06 
A-Gi BStUN >49 IK 42) 25 65 


KGS. MAPBDgt^l *649 71 
BUOAPSfpfr’O loj M 50 


KGS. . 

KGS PRAGUE |4i 2! 665 7216 
KGS. WAfSAW (48-23 562 555 


& INTERDEAN 


FOB A REE ESTIMATE CAU. 

PARIS (1)39201400 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. ! 



If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get it at home ? 
Someday deSvery available 
in key U.S. cities. 


Cdl m 800 882 2884 

(in Nnriari 


rd* cdl 212 752 3890) 

3rralb:^££ribimc 


MIIASCHON. The nwsi nAned of aB 
w. an ZURICH ndusvHy et • 
WBNGG'i leakng men* Hoe ■ 
))-?)]> 50 


13. Bohnhofo i 0)-: 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Engfeh 
spedbng me e hro dob. Tek PAHS 
(t| 46 34 59 65. ROME #8 0320 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


NEAR CANNES, Wwui «th. brauft- 
M hm 6 nwaiw vwwv 8 bedroom. 


3 <etep bore, swmnang pod, 
i ha pork For ;ert or for sale. TeL 


m 


92 97 67 02. Fa. Pens Ml 10 93 59 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Your Sturio or Aptvwiert 

IN PAHS 

Far I day. 1 week 0> more 


A 


tv at 3 pros 

uTADMB TROCADSO 


129-131 Id 

75008 PAHS 


TeUJJ 5377.0707. Fo» (1) 4563.4664 


1 f ixxJ Ouf spead rtdu&on 
far He rati Tribune readers. 


DEAL ACCOMODATION 

READY TO MOVE-tN 

From stutfio to 5 betkooro 
• TOP QUALITY - aedt cant accepted 

De Crcoort Associates 

Id 1-47 53 80 13 Fan 45 51 7S 77 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSES 


sproc*ih n funafnd apartments, 
resdentd aea, 3 monfra and mare. 


Td: ( 1 ) 42 25 32 25 

Fa* (1) 45 1 


633709 


AT HOW W PARS 

PARIS PROMO 


apartmeats to rer< fonhhed or not 
Soles 4 ftopertyManogaawn! Sendees 
2S Av Hoche 7500B PorisTFoa 1-4561 1020 


Teh ( 1 ) 45 63 25 60 


3 rd, MAR AIS, hgh dos towteue, 
character fid, 4 room, bjChen. mo* 
chines, pukav F18D00. 1-4727 6120 


YOUR HOW Ri PARK 

NTBURBB 

Luxury ratals & ides 
31 rue de Monaai. FW 75098 


Tel: ( 1)45 63 17 77 


CAPITA1E • PAXTtGRS 
Hondpded qsaf*y apacrum, 
di sue* Pan and sutwrfo. 

Tel 1-4614 821 1. Fax 1-4772 3096 


AUTO RENTALS 


RENT FROM DERGI AUTO 
MKPO FF 515 
SPEQAL OFFER - 7 DAYS- FF 1500 
PAHS 1H: (1)45 87 27 0* 


WORLD AVIATION • SOEDUED 
RIGHTS. In. h area, economy a» 
been fare. TeMFT Pars m 47551313 


EMPLOYMENT 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


17Rv WAGRAM - MAIESHEBB. I 
Superb and very elegant 200 sqm., 
ferae kvtng, large (finng. 4 bedrooms, 

2/3 bothroocra, not) ( bright ftxV- 

r-a FI 5,000. Tet Til 47 23 W 84. 


ACCESS VOYAGES 

Tiff BEST FARES TO 


PIACE TROCADSO. fvwg. 2 bed- 

rooms. 2 baths, sun. 9tf> Boor, terrace, 
view HTeJ Tower, high doss. 24hr- 
sewdyjntOODi CW47S&275 


TROCADSO. BeaukfuL elegor* & 
DfwxL * ocaroonij. nice “tnen. 

FUjEjo. TeL P)<7 23 0< 84 


MBS 5 Vi, 2-room fk* m tpwnhoiae. 
entry, krtchen, bath, sum. v*w, 
hatona TeL Chvntr 1-43 54 6 69 


78 CHAMPS ELYSES sfedb, elegmJ. 

k ftofessran 

ugpwn 


tunny, cdkn, high cdfegL Piofesjonol 
” KMO. Tefl 


EVRY, 35 me south Ffera Rft, large 

stedfe w8h separate LkJwn, duer 

roan, FratOO nu. TeL til 64 97 87 17 


15* CONVBfTlON, lorge. modem. 
60 Su&-j,lMng + bedroom. Ouet, on 


garden. FiM TeL fl) 47 23 04 84 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGBVT 1 N PARS 
Tab ( 1 ) 47 . 20 . 30.05 


CHAMPS aYSBS, in icnrahcue 120 
H)JIU 3 betfrooru, 2 bcehroom, K, 
fireplace. Decorated, lumuiou, on a 
garden. Pcrtwg fetCoI 1-4663 6464. 


NEAR 8 ASTR1E, 8 0 SCLM. Lovely 4. 
room apvtmert. Ported coodnart 
moo not. Tot Oamer fl 13976 35 31 


THE UNTIE) STATES 

end over 500 more desteichons «orld- 
vnde on 40 divert scheduled comers. 


btoush language training 

■ CONS ULT ANT leq uted iar no aan- 
egemerr cbemete ir Pans ouurea 
and «T3n« npenence euenkd 
Ccraocf Stephan* Caey at Pans (1) 
44 78 03 58 


Td- PARS 1-40 13 D2 02 or 42 2T 46 94 
Foe 1-42 21 44 20 
MMIHj 3615 ACCES5VOYAGES 
TeL LYON 78 63 67 77ar72 56 15 «5 


BOOK NOW by phone wah credtf card 
G o venvnent Licence 175111 


BUHNBS LANGUAGE TRAB4R4G 
arwae seeks a highly piexiacUe. 
QtdCMd Anioncon Enafeh teacher 
Oetove speeded, aged 25/30. busrns 
^W/eduumaa Tet Pam (!) 


B4GU5H TEAOOS, bkngua). roperv 
enced. feOnme. Legd or fmtad 
knowledge preferred, let 
langie-rare (IJ 4561 JL56. 


Cytute 


lieralb^s^Mvxbnnc 


PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quiddy and easily, contact your 
nearest IHT office or representative with your text. 
You will be informed of fhe cost immediately, and 
once payment is made your ad will appear wftfiin 
48 hours. All major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 


NORTH AMERICA 


NANCE 

TeL' 

Ton 


GERMANY. AUSTRIA &CBTOAL 


NEW YORK: 

Tel- (212)752-38901 
TJ 572-721 2. 

Tefae 427175 
Fiat |2I2)755-B7B5 


Td. 

Fbc 


7267 ! .. 

7273 IQ 


SWinEBANDcPdk 

’29&21. 


ASUV/PAlCffK 
HONGKONG; 


F«l 


11728: 
11)7283091. 


Tel: (852)9222-1188. 

cc 61170 HTHX. 


UNIDIMGDOM landau 
M; 1071)836^02 
Ur 262009. 

Fex (071)240 2254. 


lefec 

Fcrc (852)9222 1190. 
SMGAPORE; 

Tel: 2236478. 


Fax (65)224 15 66 
sc 28749 HTSN. 


Teloc I 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


KEADOSAtEADVBB) 

that tbm latmraaHoaal 
Herald TrSeme aemeot be 
held reepoedble fee lees er 
deeaie- 



BUSCVESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OffSHOSE COMPAIiSS 


• 73D READY MADE COWANES 

• BAMC INTSODUCnONS 

- ACCOUNTS, LEGAL & ADMN 

• IC» AFC TRADE DOCUMBVTAnQN 
' TUmCNE 6 MAI FORWAIDMG 


Tetefhcre or fa* far mweieje semer 
ced TOO page relow brochure 


OaUASUUMTto 

24-02 Bad of America To 


Hargowt fcg^Hcr^jiong 


• Free prafeSBond mntuiaiani 

• Woridfeder 


* Ful confidertd serwees 

* Lond on tepre eattdive 

* RJ uskiaeJiuKon mrviees 


ASTON CORPORATE TRUSTEES LTD 
19. PM Road, IXwte We of Mon 
Tit 0624 626591 lw 0624 625126 


CLASS A BANK m tar free venue wdh 
odMfaM «voi end tfli iiMi e d 
bavang and wartes oneaunb. US 
S50ri«L famedfefa trawfer. Cc£ 
Canada (604) 942-6169 or Fa j 
W2-31 79 or London 071 3M 51& or 
FAX 07! 231 9928. 


ONSHORE OOWANSB: iPQt U5 
Ovdi Sheet, Dados, We of Man. 
Tet 10624] 629529 fee B6M 629662, 


HONS KONG OX S52Q. Arrnd oan 

$4211 S8 Ud. 7DI. 35 Queen's Ed C 

rtt Td: 852-5250275 Fa 652-8400217 


OFFSHORE C0MFAFE5. Fv free 
brochure or advice TeL London 
44 81 741 1224 fot; 44 B1 7484558 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


FREE 

INT’L CAUS 


Tet + 85252201 , 
Fa*; +852 5211190 


BUSH NON-RESDBff 

COMPAMB £195 


Wed touwaetnoe vchdefc 
lew preMe, free & Europea n . SuO- 
ade far tracks, oonsdMKy & odw 
acnWH- For immtdote s 0 vkc oonfack 


Sfafr Merpfry, Bfredar, Smr e n i yi 
Terdees, HHn dl w e 
, Dnfrfii 2, frefand. 


Anywhere hi the Worid 
CofitoQuaffy 


Service bpresertalhc tins 
open 24 hn. every day! 


Ui. Tell -407-676-9500 
Ext. 107 


U-S. Fax.- 1-407-676^909 
agents wacort 


CORPORATE PLAF6 AVAHAKE 



TeL- +353 1 6611490 for 6618493 / W 5. U£l. Ateftoww, fl 32?01 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls 


Saw 50% and more compered 

to UMJ ■kaBB 

WR JAMS LUIIU1HE> 

OA from hone, office, car- 
wen hotefa (and avoid 
mrctorgest Check out rates 
far ary rartno enj see how 
you cen stort saving tatfay. 


Cdl us now and WB 
cal you right badd 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 


AGAINST 

• letters of Oedt 

• Bank Obigrtons 


• Ofaer Aaxntobte GAafmd 
i trf rmeSt Imeflon 


• Boded 


by Pm 

TWttJ 


MAJOR MTl BANKS 


BHNANOAL SUP PORT ,SA 

5S£ Tel (4122) 


COmMABtEDSAFIS 


BACKS) BY CASI 

• faeed an Year None 

• Confirmed by Major fall Bvds 
'0 Prove AvaidMy of Fundi 

• Backed by Private I 


Td 1-206-284-4600 


Fax 1 - 206 - 282-6666 

Lines open 24 hours. 


^kaMback 


419 Second Avenue West 
S**fe,WA 98119 USA 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


FUNDS AVAKABlf 

FOR 

AU BUSFB5 PROJECTS 
OR FOR 

LETTBS OF CRHXT 
BAW GUARANIS 
OTl« ACCEPTABLE COUAT3AL 


Bioker's can reafe n guaranteed 


Meman MJ.PXB. A On 

hnanqal MsmunoN 

Bnraib -BOUM 

fafermohw by far 32-2 & 02 77 
or 32-2-38 Q 9) 

TREX: 20277 


ILL ( 714 ) 737-1070 Fan 757-1270 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


FUME BAMC 
GUAKANTBS 

Vertere Caprld Busnes F 


Bunes finance 
1 Term ffeanc 
Guarantees 
Afl Types of Projeds 
Comnnicn Urti Pm 


Sed Estate Long Term France 
atdFinadaC 


No Comnnicn Urd RnM 
Broken Protected 


ROTBENTATTVE 
Needed « o«J <s bdsen for w 
hi die pccesmg of itme 


VBfTURE 


ose infy in Endsh 
CAPITAL CONSULT/ 


Please it 
RECAFI 
bjveetoiMf Bankers 


Mas 


16311 VadaraBM, Sob* 999 
fadna. Cdffornia 91436 ILSJL. 
Telex: 651355 Venets ISA 
Fax No,- fll« W-1698 


nxffe: (118) 905-169 
TeL (8i8J 7994422 


SERVICED OFFICES 


tetait Offic* in Hong Kong 

• Ffaabfe short & fang term haivj 

* Fi4y hneded 6 equated weh jtna 


located >i lhe most 
Mgn-winning Aeragrine 

LippoCntoe 

Wdklhrovgh to Admirdfy subway 
deafen, tan & bus sfcfton 

“ Connected by covered wtvrays to 
tmor office buWnff, Lace hotels, 
shopping cadre & itmce apamed 

* Ftfi esecutive seentaiid support by 
n-o f e BOMl sftrff 

* Inmipoiotel and axporale vernces 
avaJoble 


AsoPoeSic Busmen Centre 
For further detok 

Mon, Mu & Asmxdes Cbneuhng Ud 


Hus 1852) 530-5937 
" ) 522-0198 


Tab 


Pei^nne Tower 
ke, AdrwdF 
Hongkong 


Adrrercfry 


YOUSOffiCElNFAMS 

^r^y^npedi, 
."T 1 t of Iwen. 


by lhe 


• M) r fard ionri modem offices 
confer nnce rooms fa rent 
hw.doy.monHiefc^ 

I Yo * to ad er p er mu ne m base 

^nuttsiniA 


Y g5fcOBtt wwwori 

Shea See h ad youl xde e 
TeL 44 pi tft 9199 F®. ^499 7517 ’ 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


£ »■». 3 .ogre; 

+ 2 r 30HB- 1? l-ilxtSfp 




1 







Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


* . 


Pa 


Pag - 


T 

ttv 

late 



ers 
Th 
Wt 
a] • 


are 

Th 

no 

Re 

sio 

Mt 

Hu 

SOI 

tor 

CO' 

no 

Eu 

an 


br 

ea 

so 

ea 

be 

ro 

fa* 


ra; 

an 

ea 

ca 

fo 

ar 


Sr 

m 

sh 

bl 

sa 

tb 

P< 

« 

re 

R 

01 


No. 1 Philanthropy Manages Portfolio In-House 


1 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

Sew York Tima Serna 

CHEVY CHASE, Maryland 
— Though other philanthropies 
are better known, the Howard 
Hughes Medical Institute is the 
leviathan, and C.F. "‘Terry” 
Wolfe is the man who minds the 
money. 


I 

Wa 

ed 

Un 

sin 

me 

pa 

uni 


No wonder he keeps a pie- 
sized Bayer aspirin on his desk. 
“You just have to cross out the 
zeros,” he said. Otherwise, 
“you'd lose perspective.” 

Given Hughes's philosophy, 
the chief investment officer has 
more to do than many conven- 
tional money managers. 

The $ 7.5 billion institute 
takes the view that the best way 
to manage its hoard is in-house. 
That means Mr. Wolfe, and his 
three deputies, do not parcel the 
money out to a dozen pricey 
Wall Street hands or follow the 
herd by plowing the funds into 
a market index. 

In the face of all the choices 
that must then be made. Mr. 
Wolfe tries to keep cooL Dis- 
claiming any special skill as a 
stock picker or market timer, he 


describes bis role, played out in 
Hughes’s new $55 million head- 
quarters, as that of a conductor. 

“1 just try to orchestrate 
things,” he said. 

Mr. Wolfe. 55, took over as 
chief investment officer May 1, 
after 30 years at International 
Business Machines Corp. 

The institute is coming out of 
something of a crossroads. Cre- 
ated in 1953 by Howard 
Hughes to promote medical re- 
search, the institute owned only 
one asset for more than three 
decades: Hughes Aircraft Co. 

The bfflionaiie had donated 
the company to the institute but 
retained control as sole trustee. 
Under pressure from the Inter- 
nal Revenue Service and in an 
effort to diversify, the institute 
sold the company to General 
Motors Corp. in 1985 for $5.2 
billion in cash and stock. 

Two years later, it settled its 
long-running feud with the IRS, 
becoming a tax-exempt “medi- 
cal institute,” a designation that 
obligates it to give away only 
3.5 percent of its assets each 
year, rather than the 5 percent 
required of foundations. 


The institute has been mak- 
ing more of an effort in recent 
years to shuck some of the se- 
crecy of its past, not the least of 
which was agreeing to give a 
reporter a rare glimpse into how 
it manages all the money. 

Mr. Wolfe — following the 
formula that made the institute 
lugger than any other philan- 
thropy — devotes about 60 per- 


out a 0.5 percent gain through 
Sept. 30. 

But far be it from Mr. Wolfe 
to shun the adventure of a cal- 
culated plunge. 

“We do make bets," he said. 
“We tend to make nucrobets.” 
By that, he commitments 

to trends and industries — 
“things we understand” — but 
not bets on market direction. 


Hughes’s chief investment officer devotes 
about 60 percent of the portfolio to equities 
and 10 percent to riskier ventures. 


cent of the portfolio to equities, 
30 pocent to fixed-income se- 
curities and 10 percent to riskier 
ventures like venture-capital 
situations and buyout funds. 

The cautious allocation has 
paid off. For the ax years 
through 1993, Hughes averaged 
gains of 12.9 percent on its 
mixed portfolio of stocks and 
bonds, handily surpassing its 
goal of 5 percentage points 
above than the inflation rate. 

This year, the portfolio eked 


For instance, the institute fa- 
vors capital equipment, tech- 
nology and other companies in- 
volved in enlarging the U.S. 
infrastructure. 

As a result, Hughes is over- 
weighted in technology (14 per- 
cent versus 8 percent in the 
Standard & Poofs 500 index), 
fevd in energy 0 1 percent) and 
underweighted in consumer 
stocks (6 percent versus 12 per- 

“xt 


biggest holding in the 


stock portfolio is still $650 mil- 
lion of the anginal General Mo- 
tors Class H stodc that die insti- 
tute got for Hughes Aircraft. 

The next biggest positions 
are Federal Home Loan Mort- 
gage Corp., AT&T Corp. and 
Federal National Mortgage As- 
sociation, which together ac- 
count for about 4 percent of all 
stock holdings. 

The rest of the stock portfolio 
is in some 135 equities around 
the globe, stakes ranging from 
$4 million tO $70 Tnfltn-y rT 

Junk bonds, puts and calls. 
Eurodollar futures and otbe: 
derivatives have a place in the 
Hughes portfolio. But below- 
investment-grade bonds are 
limited to 5 percent of the fixed- 
income portion, and derivatives 
are never leveraged. 

One constraint Mr. Wolfe la- 
bors under is the need to make 
sure that the institute has 
enough liquid assets on hand to 
carry out its philanthropic mis- 
sion. Just to meet the statutory 
minimum of 3.5 percent, the 
institute awards about $275 
milli on a year to some 275 clini- 
cal researchers. 


Treasury Sales to Burden 
An Already Fragile Market 


Knitfti-Rhdder 

NEW YORK — The Trea- 
sury debt market will have to 
absorb a load of supply this 
week amid uncertainty about 
what the Federal Reserve 
Board will decide on mone- 
tary policy next week. 

The Treasury’s quarterly 
refunding auctions and sever- 
al bill auctions this week will 
add S852 bUHon of supply to 
a market already struggling 
with concerns about inflation 
and the size of die Fed's next 
interest rate increase. 

*7 think the auctions are 
going to be pretty difficult 
because we don’t know how 
much die Fed is going to 
tighten," said Dan Seto, ana- 
lyst with Nikko Securities. 

The yield of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond rose 
to 8. 16 percent last wedefrom 
7.96 percent the previous 
week, with the price tumbling 
to 92 20/32 from 94 25/32. 


Analysts said the severity of 
the drop last week m eans 
prices mD probably consoli- 
date near current levels until 
after the Fed’s policy-making 
Open Market Committee 
meets on Nov. 15. 

“I think the market is dose 
to some technical levels now 



US CREDIT MARKETS 


so that it will stabilize,” said 
Paul Kasrid, economist with 
Northern Trust 

The Open Market Com- 
mittee meeting has cast a 
shadow over the markets 
since the Fed failed to raise 
short-term rates in Septem- 
ber, and the shadow may be 
.large enough to eclipse any 
meaningful price movement 
this week. 

An increase of half a per- 
centage point is already 
priced into the credit mar- 
kets, but the possibility that 


the central bank could raise 
rates a full 
the year is 

investors < _ 

the Treasury's refunding auc- 
tions, forcing dealers to ab- 
sorb most of the supply. 

The Treasury is selling $17 
billion in three-year nous 
Tuesday and $12 billion in 
10-year notes Wednesday. 

In the when-issued market 
on Friday, the three-year note 
was yielding around 7.4 per- 
cent and the 10-year note 
around 8 percent. 

At those yields, the notes 
still may have some value if 
the Fed raises rates by three- 
quarters of a percentage point 
on Nov. 15, analysts said. 

“It's easy to say these 
thing s are cheap," sard Steve 
Wood, director of financial 
markets analysis for BA Se- 
curities. “It’s harder to say 
that they won’t get cheaper.” 



i 


WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


Provided by CS Rrei Boston 
Limited. London. Tel: (071) 
S16 40 25. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other (actors. Nov. 4. 


Dollar Straights 


Cob mo! Price ym Try? 


Governments/ 

Supranationals 


Cjpn M 


J Ic Mar 6% S3 
lUrool Atrjuf SYl 98 
Kauai Air Oct Ob *9 


Kobe CRv Aug 7W (O 


Kobe City . 
LcfUHmD 


DC 

Wx»ay Aar 
Norway Dc 
OkbAjr 
OkbJul 
QWU'ji 

Oka Mr 
□kb Nov 


«% s 

7V, B? 
7% 97 
7 96 

Tvi n 

91b 00 
TH 02 
sh n 
m w 


Oni Hydra Nov lb n 
Ontario Pr 


Mb Jul 
Abb Jim 
AteBiAer 
AfdbAnr 
AMb Mr 


7% 02 95% 

A D 88% 

TH 02 97* 

TH 23 Wk 

SVi 04 tJYi 


Albert Pro No* 8% 96 10X099 

Albert Pro Nov 7H «S ta* 

Alberto PrOc 5 97 93* 

AAerta Pr F6b 7 03 71ft 

Asdevbk Mr 6* 04 sen 

n ic 


835 +38 
129 +34 
Sft +44 
UP -MS 

847 +41 


as 

u s 


m oo 

TH 02 
«r 01 
SH 98 

SH 9B 

r s 

5ft ao 
M 01 


AenoagFeb 
Austria Feb 
Austria Feb 
Austria Jim 

Austria Jan 

Austria Jan 
Austria Mr 
Austria Mr 
BelatumApr 
BetgtunFeb 
Beta lam Job 

■eMail 15 

Brigtutn Jut 
BetahanNav 
Betoken Od __ 

BrCttmb Jun TH 82 
Cod Wheat Feb 4H 77 
SwHmJur 6ft 97 
CM Aar 6H OS 
Cor Od 6ft 99 

CotnanfcM Jut 5% 91 
Cr Fonder Feb 9ft 99 
DeaMrkAug 4 H 77 
OenMrkFeb 4% 77 
DM Mr* Feb 5H 91 
DaiMrkOer 5ft 97 
EOCAur SH 98 
EdCAor TH 02 
BJcJul 
EdCMr 

bit NO 

>AW 


767 +36 
7ft +40 
7ft -II 
845 +46 
„ U +32 
9m US +03 
TOOft 743 +30 
91010 US +29 
60 +2 


HOW 

ions 

971* 

tout 

N» 

no* 

92ft 

mu 

76090 

lift 

rrjMB 

96% 

94ft 

77ft 

as* 

77% 

72H 


806 +a 
106 +20 
123 +38 
133 +33 
711 +34 
7J4 +]* 
TJ9 +29 
7 JO +31 
102 +31 
152 +46 
130 +40 
132 +37 
TJ5 +38 
7 Si -m 
843 +33 
7 JO +15 
112 


195ft 111 +38 


a 



Pr Feb 8ft <n 

Ontario Pr Jan 7 99 

Ontario Pr Jin Th 94 

pwtaftwae* sh <n 

Pro of On* Jun 6ft 00 
Proof Oni Jun 7H 62 


Proof On! Jan 7H 03 
Pro of Oni I 


Oct 5% 97 

OuebHrtGbi ift 02 
OoebHrdMr 7 01 

QoebH'rtPIW OH 01 
QuebecAug 9ft 01 
Quebec May 
Sad Feb 
Soamsea 
S wede n Aug 
Sweden Dc 
Sweden Feb 
Sweden Jan 
Sweden Mr 

Tokyo Oct 

Tokyo Od . . . 
Trans Tky Nov SH 03 
World Bkk Mr SH 77 
WOridBMtMr Ift 01 
WOrid Bkk Oct B% 95 
World Bkk Od 714 76 
World Bkk Oct 8ft 99 
YofchamaAug 7% 02 
Yokhma Jut 6H ID 
Yakhana Sen 7ft 04 


9' 01 
4ft 97 
6ft 99 
CH 96 
5ft 95 
9ft 9* 
4ft 97 
6V, 03 
5ft 03 
7ft 04 


prim 

rid 

Spd 

Tny 

57% 

838 

+37 

181% 

m 

+37 

93 

801 

+91 

95% 

8-25 

+40 

82ft 

88 

+46 

94% 

834 

+96 

97% 

7J9 

+16 

99ft 

7 33 

+18 

TTH 

7J4 

+7 

104% 

514 

+n 

96% 

827 

+3* 

U1% 

122 

+36 

98ft 

7a 

+11 

98ft 

154 

+«1 

180010 

548 

+62 

94ft 

111 

+47 

74ft 

m 

+S 

an* 

U4 

+42 

98% 

532 

+52 

94ft 

854 

+41 

99% 

868 

+44 

95ft 

7JS 

+38 

97D40 

878 

+84 

181% 

867 

+83 

99% 

5ft 

+» 

101% 

Sft 

+64 

HUH 

1ft 

+« 

*4ft 

7ft 

+J1 

93% 

804 

+29 

91ft 

a 

m 

98% 

+12 

ran 

13\ 

+44 

76% 

753 

+38 

88ft 

162 

+41 

Sift 

148 

+45 

95H 

868 

+39 

m 

868 

+44 

1B3H 

7ft 

+10 

WOft 

&J» 

+23 

Mm 

626 

>19 

100U 

6ft 

-11 

102ft 

7ft 

+M 

94ft 

8J6 

+41 

86ft 

1# 

+47 

74% 

147 

+40 


Banks Finance 


ExtmbkJon 
Exlifl 


bk May 

lassr as 

FedMtoAug Aft M 

Finland Apr 7H 97 
Fink! Rea Jul 7ft 04 
ReaNov 6ft 97 
6ft 03 

9ft BO 


FMd 

Si._ 

Into Aar 
Mb Ana 


Kb 

ibrdJan 


ibrdMav 
itadt 


— JMr 
I brd Nov 
IbrdSen 
■brdSea 
IfeJtta 
lie Mr 
Ird Fin Dc 
t Apr 


Italy. 


t Jun 
Italy Jun 
Italy Mr 
Italy Sen 
Italy Sep 


Bft 
6 03 

r v, 

9ft 99 
7ft 73 
9ft 96 
9H 16 
9H « 
7ft 99 
5H 03 
SH 99 
*H m 

8 * 77 

■ft <n 

5» 98 
6ft 03 


6 in 
6ft 23 


Jot Motor Jun Bft 01 
JapHatnrSep 7ft 04 
JdbDc 6ft 79 

- Feb sh m 
8ft 96 


Jdb 
JdbNov 
, Jdb Nov 
Jdb Oct 

JfcJun 

JICMOV 


7ft 99 
7ft 04 
I 02 


97ft 

764 

+25 

Abbey TmrAor*% 

94 

96% 

70* 

+58 

94% 

7ft 

+» 

rA~ir7.~7.. 

96 

98% 

7.lf 

EH 

95% 

727 

-I 


111 

wre 

753 

ill 

97% 

7jA 

+21 

Abbey TsvMoriH 

as 

87% 

LED 

tru 

96% 

95% 

820 

796 

+36 

Abbey Tsv Oct 7 
Boy Land Nov 4% 

97 

98 

98% 

901194 

7ft 
7 ft 

+32 

+14 

101% 

LM 

+35 

ir’ .jf. ' i ‘ ' j 

7 

98 

78% 

760 

-16 

sss 

L50 



9B 

95% 

7 M 

+W 

769 

+31 

97 

97% 

7ft 

+16 

w 

736 

722 

+32 

RVt-jrijJ 

97 

99 

SE 

17ft 

797 

N66 

+24 


'.92 

+26 

Bog bk Mov 

« 

00 

90% 


Ej j 

Lll 

+30 

BnabktAr 

S 

91 

94% 


Ev j 

90% 

7ft 

+11 

Bop Sco 

6 

77 

95% 


Er j 

99% 

L06 

+16 

GombancMov 7% 

77 

97% 


Ejj 1 

94860 

7.92 

+13 

CamzbkN 

7% 

98 

98% 


+31 


fJB 

+X 

L«i. An ■ 

n 

97% 


Cv-'l 

EJ 

'36 

+26 


7% 

07 

93% 

135 

EK] 

■^1 


•8 


7% 

97 

99% 

FM 

E5k j 


Ta 


Cr Local Nov 

5% 

91 



ly] 

■ft*! 

762 

+22 

Cr Local Ocl 

4% 

94 

94% 

7.22 

+19 

HBH 

'64 

+21 

Cr Local Od 
CT Local Del 

AH 

98 

96% 


C- 

92% 

'ft 

+29 

8% 

99 



tn 

MEZM 

'34 

+30 


8% 

98 

101% 


+78 


+20 


in 



Ei 

ta 

LZ7 

+41 

CsLrtiBrNo* 8% 

04 

99JJ78 


frl 

LI7 

+36 

CsLrtiBrSeg 

6% 

03 

86858 

161 

CTj 

MM 

129 

+41 

Crib Inc Oct 

7% 

98 

98% 

121 

+64 

98ft 

84% 

128 

858 

+34 

+40 

QSutsse Jon 
Db Fin Feb 

4% 

7% 

97 

n 

94% 

99% 

IS 

+36 

+14 

105% 

'37 

+32 

Db Fin Jul 

6% 

96 

li it] 

y/ i 

21 

98% 

a 

+15 

Db Fin Jul 

8 

98 




94% 139 

+» 


9% 

99 

IK1 


97% 

'ft 

+26 

DeofoFIfiMtn c% 

96 

98% 

777 

79% 

'39 

+34 

Dresdbk Nov 

6 

08 

77% 

rn 

LLL 

95% 

LA/ 

+58 

l PM 

/ 

V9 

96% 



97% 777 

+38 


4% 

97 

93% 

767 


89% 134 

+35 


6H 

UO 




96ft 768 

+13 

rteloba.No 

6% 

08 




l»ft 111 

+32 

HHcnbs Jul 

6% 

9/ 




181010 126 

+37 

Jam Inc Jun 

6% 

9/ 




8SH 835 

+32 

Hub Oct 

1090 99 




9B% 764 

+26 

KfwOroaJun 

7 

99 

94% 


5: 

103% 7J2 

+18 

Kfw Inti Feb 

6 

98 

96857 

768 

-4 

HBft 735 

+32 

Kfw Lnfl Feb 

/% 

or 

LiirJ 

' 1 


90ft 847 

+43 

Kfw nm Jun 

5% 

DO 

90% 



W £Si 

-32 

Kfw urn Mr 

8% 

98 

101 % 

rT] 


+45 

Kfw lnfl Oct 

BH 

01 

99% 


iT 

104% 789 

+31 

Kfw lnfl see 

4H 

97 

94044 

7J4 


77% 731 

+16 

LB RheMdOc 5% 

LJ 

Bin 

t' 


82% 117 

+16 

Lb Sell Lux Jul 6% 

97 


\b\ 

/i 

90% 731 

+25 

Lb Sett Lux Jon 4% 

97 

94% 

fc2J 

I 

101% 7ft 

+27 

Lkbfta* 

7 

11 

W4 

769 


im 

Lll 

+51 

UcbFbiDc 

6H 

97 

96% 

3 

+15 

ft 

+51 

LkB Fbl Jul 

6% 

03 

87882 

+37 

iMt', i 

+45 

LkbFkiMT 

SH 

98 

93% 

764 

++; 


L01 

+51 

LkBFkiOCf 

6% 

82 


l ll 

EM 

ft 

+15 

Mot Nov 

7 

96 

99% 

till 

ELI 

W 

121 

+59 

NontLanflMr 6% 

03 

89% 

161 

+62 

Ift 

*72 

NwrtSeo 

r. 1 

ill 

97% 


Lll 

76% 937 +1)2 

RobobkNov 


98 

99% 

7J4 

CT- 

101% Bft 

+42 

l irrm 

C3 

91 

91006 

741 

-3 

94% 867 

+38 

It •. iT, j M 

6 

97 

76% 

7J4 

+7 

95% 800 

+23 

RMn Drag Scr+H 

91 

97% 


El 

100% 827 

+41 

SBC Cay Jun 

6% 

97 

98% 

739 

Id 

182% 727 

+28 

SBCCmnOcf 

/ 

ft 

99 JOT 

733 


104300 7ft 

+» 

SBC Jeney JivHH 

M 

85% 

1 bl 

CT -1 

78850 7 M 

+22 


7h 

»/ 

99% 

1/ 'J 

C' 7 ! 


+39 

r~r m 


.1 

■vffl 

1^1 

* *- | 

98% 8JK 

+36 

Ubi Fbi Feb 

9% 

02 

103% 

1 L 1 



Cpn Mat fncB Ytd 


Spd 

Xnv 


Global Co r por a tes 


97ft 7JS +24 

94ft 7JJ +54 

_ 93ft 137 +41 

9ft 16 104ft ?J1 +103 
I 00 


Abb Fla Jun Oft 97 

ASMFlnAui Oft 97 

AtnaCaaSoe 7H ta 

AraoCoMr — 

AadoiCNv I 00 iCH 7Ji +3 

AIT Apr 6% 97 nsn 744 +29 

AIT Apr 5ft 98 93% 7.71 +31 

ATT Feb 5ft 97 lift 7.88 +26 

AIT Jon Mb 96 M 6B « 

Bocord RnJal 5H 9H 92ft 130 +47 
Bast Fbl Aug 7 99 95% 122 +49 

BOSl Fin Apr 3 81 73H 856 +78 

act Cap Apr 6 tb «k 7ft +52 

BOlOmNav 6ft 03 Mft 9£Q +74 

BovenaOct » W Tgft m +33 

Belisltl Tc Jai SH 98 92H 7J* +26 

Britain Tc Sep Mb ti 79ft 170 +69 


BmwLeolfOv 7ft M 79ft 7J9 +49 

M M M US +t| 


BfflwUsCcMr _ 

Boats Ftc Jan 9 97 MU47 7J0 +76 

BPamerf#r 9H 99 TO* 124 +U 
BpeaFInApr 8ft 91 109ft U4 +57 
BT Gas ltd Jul 6H 03 86ft 146 +M 

BT Grata! Mr 6H 97 98ft 744 +24 

BrGosIntSca Bft 99 180H in 441 
BtFtaAus 4ft 97 974* 744 +9 

Bl Fla Aug BH 99 IIBH 113 +41 

BS Flo New 9H 9« MM ft ISO +48 

CobtaWIntOc 6ft 03 

OMuiaFlnScaSft 98 
Od no Dr Nv 6ft 03 


adna Rep Feb Oft 04 
' iBtAi 


SH in +88 
<8ft 981 +146 
BOft 945 +141 
83ft 934 +128 
863* 152 +50 


OHJbuEIAuB 6H 03 
ChutwEIJon 9 97 1IBH 757 +40 

OMbu El Sep BH W KCH 7J9 +44 
OtugoEIFeb 7 97 

OMCorpDc Oft 77 
CnaCarpMr 5ft DC 
ObaCnrpOct 5ft 98 
CafaAmotlMv 7H 96 
CombaacMay 7ft 97 
Dotal Hoc Oct 8 90 

Daimler Apt 18 99 


OupanTEIAar 0 02 

Bft 90 


98H 743 +44 
94ft 742 +21 
90H IIS +39 
92ft 7J1 +21 
99ft 749 +40 
99V* 7JI +71 

979* 103 +47 
1059* 834 +48 
97ft 837 +44 
101ft 7J2 +41 
77V 107 +40 


1B0H 7J7 +21 

BOY. 161 +49 

85ft 174 +69 

9ft 00 WPb 157 +76 

“ ~ 97ft 742 444 


Dupont El Jun _ _ , 

Duoaat El Jun 7ft 99 ... 

EH AsuftMr TH 97 108ft 728 +8 

EULUvJul 5ft 98 73V* 7JC +18 

EltraJan I n H* Ul +4 

Emerson 7ft 7ft 98 NBH 75fl +W 

EnersleBe Jul Pt oo sn* no +34 

EsthmnriVMrOft W 17ft IS +49 

EuroflrmMtn Bft 01 lOTft 146 +57 

Exxon Mr tft 03 Bevy 109 +M 
Exxon Oct ■ 91 — 

Exxon Sep 8ft 08 
FacNov tft 83 
Farit Aug 

Font Eo Oct 4ft 97 

Ford Jun 9H 97 104333 711 +83 
Ford MCr Jun 6H 97 98ft 733 +24 
Forth Fin Nay TH 94 97H 117+108 

FrtMfrCcFebOH 90 95H 181 +57 

G*C Apr 7ft 97 97H 7A4 +71 

GeCCAug 4ft 97 98330 730 4 

GeCCAug AO 82H 161 +49 
GoccFeb 4 IB 99ft 739 +1$ 
GeceFeb 4 D4 WH 143 +3J 
GoeeJun Oft 97 97ft 742 +M 
Get* Mr 4ft 96 96V 174 +13 

GaccMr 5 97 Mb 7M +» 

GeceMr Bft » 102348 7M +42 
Gecc Mr 6ft 99 93H 73* +22 

Get* Mr 5ft 99 — 

GeccSoa 5 98 

Get* Drag Apr 5ft IB 
Gecc Drag Nay 4H 96 
Gecc Tr A Fad Oft 97 
GoneccanOct BH 99 
GMAC 6H 98 
GMACOCt 7H 97 
Grand invJwi 7 99 

HJHOtnzOCt 7ft 96 
HcndFlnDc 6 98 

HewtetFtnDe Tft 97 
NftocMCrDc Tft 96 
HlfcxMCr Jul 7ft 97 98394 722 +82 
HBocM Cr Jut 5ft 98 91ft 109 +57 
HoeeftHAua * 00 ffft 136 +55 

HokurU El Oct 6ft 97 95ft 738 +51 
Hondo Mtr Feb 9ft 97 T03JJ29 136 +81 
I On Japan Dc 6ft 97 96ft 737 +57 
Intelsat Aag 7V 82 — 

iDteftnt Jan t* do 
InMsitMr 6ft 04 
iDtetsotOct 8ft 04 
InvestrAbJan 6ft 99 
>4 CO Jul 6ft 08 
JdnmJKw 7ft 97 

Kodak Apr 7* 97 
Korea EISA (ft 1* 

Korea Eld Dc «H 83 
KvwtaiEftJu(6ft <B 
Mat EJ Aug 7H 02 
Merck Co Dc SH 91 _ 

MallUlFdOct 7H 96 100ft 732 +49 
Minnesota Jun 4H 97 979b 729 

Mltwto EsJ Sep 3^ 01 — — 

Natt Power Dc 6H 83 
Norite HMXw 6 98 

NesttoHtdAagift 97 
NastteHUFrii 5 97 

Nestle Hid Fob 6ft 97 
NostloHMJun 5ft 98 
Nestle KM Nor 7V* 96 
Nestle HWOd 3ft 99 ... _ 

Norsk Hyd Apr BH 97 108ft 733 +70 
Norsk HydOd 8V 01 99ft 180 +90 


91ft 721 +26 
91ft 755 
WH 738 +31 
94ft 738 +3 
lift 7JJ7 -71 
1BTH in +41 
94ft 138 +57 
98H 732 +55 
95H_ 8JB +81 
HH 736 '+53 
■9b 927 +177 
99ft 733 +72 
98ft 736 +83 


93ft 837 +51 
939* 121 +43 
17ft 159 +53 
98ft 154 +44 
lift 150 +88 
86 ft 193 +91 
99ft 748 +9 
99ft 130 +77 
Mb 751 +98 
S3H 924 +119 
17ft 153 +50 
73ft 151 +56 
91ft 7J1 +71 


99ft 173 +84 
BSH 167 +62 
95H 7J6 +20 
98ft 7.17 .16 

95ft 733 +20 
97ft 738 +70 
«flt 7J1 +21 
99ft 733 +13 
829b 757 +71 


Sad 

Cpn Mri Wee Yld Trajr 


NtTDC Bft 
NIT Feb 6 

Ml T Jul 9ft 

NIT Jut 9 

NIT Mr Mb 

MIT NOV Tft 

Nt T Nov 6ft 

NtTNdtf 9ft 
OesterrricAMnsv 
Osaka Gas MoySft 
PMIMorr^Tft 

6ft 

„ M 

Pro Fin Od 8ft 
Redtaid Us Jul 7ft 
Reed Eisev Oct Tft 
Rood PUM Jul 9ft 
Roctte Xw 2V 
Roche May 3ft 
RrCoplrKJnl 7ft 
SahtsburMta SH 
Sababurr Nov 7ft 
SatasburyOd 9H 
SandozQtSBAr <Ab 
SomteO/SSeot 
SjCjCTJuI 9ft 
SbJkofc Aug (ft 
Stamen CP Xw 8 
SmntuCN* 7ft 
Sony Captt Jut 5 
Saotatu»Ha»7ft 
Sun Hung Nov 5ft 
SwtssroUsXw 3H 
Top Aug SH 
T no Jul ift 

TMCCDC TH 
TMCCFeb 6ft 
TMCCJen 5ft 
TMCCMT 5 
TMCCOct 6V 
TutxjkuEJeApr7H 
Tokyo Gas Jal Sft 
Toyota FWDc tft 
Toyota FW Od 7ft 
Toyota MC Jun 6ft 
Tovota Me Mr 5ft 
UnBcvJtri 7H 
Unllev Mr >ft 
Ur* lev Mr 9ft 
USWBlt JUl Sft 
Vattentafl Jun 6 
VotvoGrpSep 7ft 
VWInflAM 3 
VwlntlOd 9ft 
Wot-Mrljun 6H 
WatMrtOct 5ft 


97 


183ft 
1Q3H 
98ft 

96 999b 

97 97V* 

98 »4ft 

99 102ft 

S tM 
19316 
97 9711 

97 93V. 

78 1 039b 
01 98V. 

9 7 98ft 

99 96ft 
97 106314 
00 76ft 
01 74H 


ft 


92ft 


_ +78 
73* +44 
132 +41 
7.43 +21 
728 +11 
724 ft 
757 +38 
124 +53 
751 +41 
7.93 +71 
737 +48 

a +83 
+42 
151 +48 
831 +89 
■21 +86 
736 +54 
■a +49 

S! 


96 H2H 
0B 979* 

■ 87ft 

97 raft 

■ 86H 

97ft 


97 


96 Vi 
Wft 

89V. 

82ft 

H)?ft 


_ +92 

839 +40 

731 +42 

732 449 
635 +16 
7J7 +31 

106 +75 
153 +51 
143 +48 
7 JO +41 
737 +47 

107 +43 
189 +130 
114 +37 
7J9 +36 


Floating Rate Notes 


Crt. 

Price Cpn. 


Ecus 


Ben Dl Rom 
BatatamApr 




SB? 

99ft 


98ft 

98ft 

94ft 


991b 

Mb 

94ft 

9S9b 


94H 
92ft 
1Q7H 
104 ft 
92ft 
9SH 
9SH 
72H 
104H 
95ft 
91H 


7X1 +29 
729 +23 
457 +1 

751 +31 
7.11 +7 

735 +51 

733 +J1 
740 +27 
753 +15 
744 +16 
7^1 +17 
8X1 +34 

734 +38 
LI6 +36 
132 +51 
LW +50 
150 +75 
157 +89 
130 +73 
038 +38 
731 +21 


Dollar Zeros 


Issuer 

Mat Price Ykt 

Trjv 

AdbAua 

04 

45% 

6J6 

+7 


00 

62% 

855 

+45 

Bth'il jJviJB 

B4 

«% 

£8 

+ 12 


DO 

‘ 41% 

123 

+31 

r i i r r* 

97 

739. 

11.98 

+413 

Austria Jul 

ft 

95% 

669 

+57 

BP Coe Jun 

ft 

95% 

6.91 

+112 

Br Gra inf Nov 

21 

10820 

889 

+78 

CcceMay 

ft 

96% 

1.14 

+152 

CcaeMay 

01 

6W* 

198 

+1 

CcceMay 

82 

ss 

132 

+26 


07 

55 

177 

+33 

CcceP 

•9 

29% 

tn 

+33 


ft 

98 

769 

mi 


96 

fM9V 

159 

+HJ1 


9/ 

6«% 

181 

+/6 


98 

77X69 

829 

+84 


99 

71% 

aft 

+58 


01 

59% 

855 

+5V 

I*_ ’ 1 n7 x 

02 

»% 

154 

+49 

Own NyFeb 

03 

4*H 

1/9 

+65 

CrNISeg 

8% 

97 

KQH 

720 

Ob Fin Jan 

ft 

263% 

IUL 


DenMrtAuo 

18 

76% 

IM 

•24 

Exxon Nov 

U 

44% 

1ft 

+1 

Fsl Fed Feb 

05 

41% 

19/ 

+65 


ta 

89% 

isu 

+2* 


« 

97% 

/.« 

■MOB 

GenMUbAug 

04 

44% 

151 

+09 

GeniMlbAus 

u 

18% 

965 

+83 

to* DC 

96 


/6I 

+43 

ladbDc 

02 

57% 

135 

+23 

lixaDc 

03 

49% 

110 

■12 

htabDc 

•6 

36% 

111 

+29 

fadbJun 

w 

89% 

7.16 

+*J 

kiObJun 

98 

76% 

158 



01 

141% 

759 

+1 

todb Jun 

03 

50% 

130 

+13 

lorttPDe 

08 

30 

191 

+3/ 

ibrtOO 

07 

53 

1ft 

+22 


9/ 

E2 

880 

+112 

ItrtrMr 

99 

TIH 

118 

+63 

fnaMfn 

99 

67% 

880 

+11 


9/ 

82% 

Ul 

-a 

MkkflekmnJul 

10 

365 

263 

-546 

MruCaroJiri 

ft 

94* 

Ut 

+185 

N EngtonFeb 
PruRerttrJan 

99 

99 

72% 

t ft 

Tft 

+15* 

+22 

Safa Nov 

94 


M64 

IM4 

SBC Cm Nov 

V 

85% 

735 

+1 

Scot O/S Jut 

98 

75H 

104 

+*5 


•1 

59% 

111 

+13 

VkPubJSep 

99 

68* 

7ft 

+18 

WWfmnFtaMay 

*4 

ta 

ML 



BOP AWN 
C&nJon 95 

S »F ebW 
Fonder Apr 96 
Or ItaBo July? 

Eta Feb m 
E lb Aug 07 
ETU Po Mar 94 
/WpTmJunJunT? 
isvetmerNavN 
Italy Od C6 
LpvoroaTs AprOd 
Public Pwr Sep 97 
SHNbainaParP 


99ft 

79H 


9Sft 

n 

ieo 

99ft 

ft 

95ft 

«9Vb 


91ft 


842 

DJB 

ail 

143 

137 

732 

an 

arc 

045 
ai7 
aja 
002 

046 
U6 
059 
•22 
069 
852 


US. Dollars 


Abbey T»Mv 99 
tor Sit 


Abe Mar 94 Mar M 

AbdUwSwB 
Atm Amro Apt ts 
AfenAmraAitaB 


99ft 

99 


AOr Amro Re Jul CB 
Advance BJ 


. _lBkJon99 
AlbPsrp P*ro 
ABtPtC No«49 
AtaPtcJute 
Alaska Hse Jut 01 
Alba Fta jun DO 
ArnexBkFebM 
ART Bks Ga Apr 00 
Ant Bks Gp Dk 99 
ArtBkgGoOdO 
AiaBkgGpOcta 
Ant BkS Gp Feb 96 
AffkBfcgGp Mar 95 
AaX Bks Gp Feb 95 
AtabBkngJunOO 
Asfinos Jiri97 
Asblkaga Sea OD 
Astk-CBer Jd 0B 
Aarirte Jan 03 
Austria Odd 


U 2 
Mt 
91 124 

97ft 1® 
100ft 025 


037 

71 on 

8 JH va 

ca 134 

77ft 024 
98V* 037 


& 

1 M 


Austria Aug 77 
ota Sep 9! 


I* 

99% 

97% 

99ft 

97% 

97ft 

97 

92 

92 


BocobafaSep97 
Bocoba/sNovSM 
Banco NazAug 97 
BanamunltlJuioa 
BatarialiMarN 

BerdovOWNav49 

Bgrdaysl Jal 49 

Bandar s2 Feb 49 

Barings BvJaa 01 

BotnasBvMartl 

BalNSaMorM 
Bayer Land Aug 05 
flavor Land Mav 03 
Boyar Vera Aug 05 

Bayer Vere Jan 03 

Bayer Ve« Aug 02 
BM (Brp) Jan JIPiN 
SHtaHNiNCt 

B1V Inti Jun 81 

BN mtl Apr 99 
BcNap LdnOecH 

BcNSiLdn Novf9 

Be Nap Ubi Feb 99 
Be Nap L5i Dec 98 

Bco D» rtam Jun O' 

BcaDi Ram Dec 99 
Boa Dl Rom AwT7 
BcoDI Rom Jul 97 
Bri Junta 
BooNwHkSepB 

Ben Nop In Aug 97 

BcocomOal Jgn 95 

Bdgiuni Nov 94 
Belgium May 76 

Belgium Jan *5 

Betafcxn Dec 99 
Bergen Bk Aug 77 
Bergen Bk Aug 49 
Bice Aug 77 
BMF1nBvMarf7 
Biw*bnkAwS3 

BrtttoenSepW 
Bilbao imioAuegi 
Bk Chfaki Od 97 
BkQ8aoMay97 
Bk ctn na Jufta 
Bk Greece 300 Dec 96 
Bk Greece Dec ta 
BkGroeceMarn 
Bk Greece Mar 99 
Bk Graea Dec 98 
Bk inland Sap 49 
Bk Ireland Dec 49 
Bk MeiMurOd 77 
Bk Mantrl Jul 98 
Bk Nova Sc Aug 49 
Bk Scat Nov 49 
Bk Seta land* Pero 
BkasranunlOctOl 
B«sAub 99 
BMIHklNuvDJ 
BnJ IHklOcin 
Bap Feb 03 

BnoOcf92 

Bnpjuifj 
BnpSwtT 
Bnp Feb 75 
Boa Carp Jim 83 
Boa Carp Neva 


ij» 

99% 


072 

849 

048 

063 

142 

8.18 

836 

007 

ODD 

OLU 

816 

096 

8.99 

un 

121 

on 

134 


97ft 059 
97% 024 


138 
U4 
1.12 
130 
050 
158 

117 

118 
III 
124 
057 

26115 

_ _ 009 

971* 854 

9Sft 052 


S7H 

85% 

99ft 

98 

85ft 

S7H 

BSH 

9TH 

93 


97ft 


9M 


Kb 

77ft 

77H 

un 

98ft 


98% 

97% 

97H 

97H 


79ft 


75H 

Wft 

99% 

■BH 


043 

030 

054 

052 

032 

0JS 

038 

112 

059 

133 

030 

on 

Ml 

001 

0 E 8 

as 

049 

US 

■81 

III 

153 

L13 

829 

143 


99V, 042 

MO 046 


97% 

talk 

77% 

77% 

98% 

T0H 

«ft 

97% 

■ft 

78 

83 

MH 

Kft 

77ft 

17ft 

87ft 

TIH 

71% 


18 


134 

111 

■JO 

044 

137 

131 

111 

026 

847 

133 

1J8 

139 

036 

040 

US 

131 

un 

139 

828 

150 


TIH 131 

tth am 


hsuar lifts 


Crt 

Cpn. 


Boa Carp Mar 99 
Boa Caro Mav 98 
BriHtdgKorTT 
Bq Partaas Nov OS 


79ft 

WOft 


BrttCritmi Feb 03 
Broodeov Od 99 

BtoycSepffi 

Blnvcapr 05 

cadOatartaHyMarf? 

codSekS*DQ2 

Cartpto Fet>98 

CvWoAPr97 

Casrtroi Jut 99 

Cu Varna Feb 99 

Cba Jol49 

Qia Feb 49 

Cba Jut 97 

Os Feb 99 

a»Ju!9B 

Ccd Mar 77 

CdAugBS 

CcLtAar 04 

COL May S3 

Cdlwtfk5ep« 

1 75 


92% OM 
9BH 070 
TIH LQ 
87ft 153 


W 


117 

022 


79% 

97% 


sskr 

CflAuxflOdB 
Ot AuxB Feb 03 
CBAuxBSCPtB 
Chase Allan Sea 03 


99ft asz 
77% 039 

97% 112 

I* I 

100 038 

Ttab 

72 


OiemcorpAprtO 
CJtauna Fin a^ta 


Jen 81 

CbinoTstAprta 

Christ CtaOd 77 

ChrixtOgSepBI 
Christ Ob Nov 47 
CBxA»« 
ate Jut 49 
Otic Rtfdeernr Aar® 
Otlcry No Sen 05 
Ottcry Ho Junes 
artery NaAosO 
CutntXBJC Sep 82 
Coma Fin Nov 05 
ComrjbnkSep02 
Comzbk o/sNovOS 
CanabkatsAugB 
Camzbke/sNovR 
CamBk.A«a9B 
Cactirovtak Fr junOD 
CrDu Nurd Od 97 
CrltaBaAagQO 
Cr I k4 la Jun 97 
Cr Local apt 05 
Cr Local Feb (D 
CtlPcakAagtQ 
Cr LyomSeoQS 
CrLyannMarBT 
Cr Lyono AD977 
Cr Liana Jun 95 
CrLrimnJtaDO 
Cr Lyaei Dec 99 
CrLvatm Jul 98 
CrLyanRMarH 
Cr Natl Od 05 
Cr Natl Fab 97 
Crd Load Dec 77 
Cred It Hk Jun 03 
CredtaaOsMmfT 
CretSI Loc Dec 82 
CretfltamtAogflS 

CradrtooafcAariD 
Crtdaoo/s Septa 
Cragem Fin May 03 
CstbBv Mur 49 
cgta b* n se> 99 
Csfb BySSeo 99 
CsfuBvAugO 
Crib Bw Mar 03 
CstaGfpOdftS 
Crib Gra Mt Feb (□ 
Crib me Mar 04 
CstblncFebM 
Crib Inc Jan 81 
a Italia Feb 00 

Doewua Auq95 

DbFkiNvOdB 
Dai Danske Nov 49 
Den Daaka Fr jwi a 
DenDonriieTr Jun W 
Don Notske Ne Aug 49 

Den Norake 01 Now 4? 

Dfcfi jpmSePOQ 
Donotuse588 5Feb*3 
DresFlnSepO 
Dread* to Aw 05 

DrestbkAgMorOt 


IS 

.... 

ms am 

100% tU7 

79% 854 

»5% 066 

76H 230 

77 lit 

E & 

87% L34 

90% Lll 

91ft U4 

93ft 087 

85 132 

72H 132 

BSH IIS 

85H L64 

97% 0fl« 

1 «W. 02 * 

96ft 033 

99ft 02* 

77ft 057 

97ft OS 

86% 160 

Wft 137 

Wi 89S 

80ft 241 

90% VS 

98% 066 

100 ITS 

97ft 057 

99T* (LOO 

TOO 02* 

99ft 0J6 

ESft 130 

97% 039 

100 % OT8 

97ft L28 

79 US 

71W 1.11 

85ft 116 


88% 

100 

88 H 

77ft 

93 

74 

89% 

90 
82ft 
92b 
92% 
93 

91 

HBH 

99% 

92 


U4 

033 

158 

152 

130 

111 


IS 


2.11 

139 


min 

ioo% 

75ft 


L10 

l a 


Orasdbk^AorO 


EbfdOdl 
Edl JunM 
EdcFebS3 
Eta Nov 02 
Ed! Feb 99 
Eftbunca MW 96 
Epct Thol MOT 05 
Elb Jan ID 
EtaOdC 
Eksoortfki AugtD 
EkBnrifinSapOZ 
Elders Res Dec 9* 
Eup Coal Dec 01 
EuroflmaJwiO 
Exlm Korea Sep 77 
Exterior Nav 01 

Fxk. Dec76 
F*k.Od02 
FerrovleMar Mtty97 
Fbi GcAugOl 
Fin dc Sep 70 
Fin Ck: MOV 96 
Fla Eta Aug 77 
Fin Real Aug 95 
Flncn OcVovTt 
Finland May 99 
Finland Jul 77 
FCrdmCr Aug 98 
Full Ini Fin Septa 


LSI 

23 
000 
US 
134 
039 

xm 

MW 
800 
1.15 
MV 
0J0 

ra 

034 
137 

137 
132 

138 
532 
OM 

139 
W* OT7 

98ft 821 

99ft 051 

12 1.17 

99% ai 2 

9^ 021 

lOOft 020 

190 015 

99ft 838 

99% 029 

97ft OIS 

97% 006 

97% aoo 

100 824 

77ft 878 


99% 

92% 

45ft 

2 * 

« 

91 

91 
101 

9Bft 

97% 

91ft 

TTH 

89ft 

taft 

92 
79ft 
91ft 


bwa SMta 


Issuer & Met 


NNoawUeNavTS 

Okobank 20000d 00 


GUILD] Feb 98 
GJJUJbmi) Sop 77 
Giro Cr An Dec Bl 
GsttsBlpHayOS 
Goldman LpOctta 
GtadmmLp Aug63 
GofdmcxiLpMaytD 
GotanwnLp Febta 

Grata Lakes Doc 97 
Gt Western Mar 75 




OkitaankJ. . 
□spree Aug 98 
Osprey Aus 95 
People Can DecW 


Pro of Oni 7M 99 



Quebec Apr L 

OaebecOetSl 

Quebec HydOd DS 

RbcJoitB 
Rbc Jun*? 


**£*£&> 


HsbcsDcctT 
HsbcsAugta 
Hsbcs Jta47 
Hyundai Dec 8 Dec97 
Hyvndta Motor Odta 


Rente.! 

Rhone Paul Dec ta 
RRmaMW+T 
Rob Firm Nay 49 
Romct JanB 
RtabctSapta 
RovtaTtaJ _ 


Rtbk Mny96 
■■APT 96 




Nay 02 


ibrdMarfB 

ibspNassNaWB 


IbSP Turin JM 00 
I bsp Turin Feb 78 
IbspnJulOS 
Ibsen Jul 01 
I ml Bank May 99 
I ml Buik Dec 98 
I ml Bank Jun 98 
lari Bank Sep 77 
tartan Oil Kev 9* 
Indonesia Feb 01 

ladosuezOdOS 

ladosaezNav97 
lndosuezAug97 
tag Mav 83 

InoBkOdtS 
Ids Ltd Dec 95 
1st Cron Dec 91 
tSVf+roarMcr 76 
isvelmer Jut95 
(5yefcnerApr95 

IsvetmerFOblS 

ISytanwNavM 
Italy Jul 77 

Italy Jann 
ikrivlftdjviTT 
III lot Bk Junta 
JpatlncAprDS 

Jem Inc Nov 02 
Jem Inc Aug 02 
KopMay 96 
KblflmoAorll 
KdbApr79 

KtaiJta77 
idem Ben Junta 
Kos i un u ntav Jut 78 
KopSI/SMovM 

Kao 15/ May 91 

Kdp 71-May 96 

Kaa 29/ May 98 
KagJUtTT 
KaeSep43 
K-opMI Feb 76 
Korea Ezdi Mar 77 
Load Hess Septa 
Lavaro Bk Sep 78 
Lb f " 

Lbl 


5afoAprl_ 
SoUamaSiaB 
SolomlncFta>04 
Sen Porto Usd Jon 97 
SarstaMaDecTt 
Santana CJ Mor 77 
Santander Septa 
SbabOdiC 
Sbab Junta 
Scot tat! Junta 
Be Barium JuaKI 

5e Balkan Jal 97 

Sek Nov 82 
Se W ar b u rg Jul Bt 

SbeahPtcjLmCJ 
Skoabank Apt 99 
Skapbank OdfA 
Skapbatk Aag96 
SkaabcnkaPeJrta 
Sad Dec 02 
Sad MaW 
Socgen Nov 49 
SacsenTsr Aag02 
Socaen tv septa 
SocoenerDecK 
5etatab Ab Od 98 


OuerBMa 


GL- 

Cpn 


SotaMtAbSepM 
51 Bk Nsw FA 03 
SI Bk Vic Od49 _ 
St Bk Vic Jun 99 I 


St George Feb CO 
stand Chi JHB 


I- 

79% 


Jut 49 

Stand OiJ Dec 49 
Stand Oi4 Jan 49 
Stand Char Nov ta 
Slat Ab Septa 
sinddiotai Jun97 

StockhabnOd97 
SuedwrrtlOd84 • 
Sural Fin Aug 00 
SwwBfcon Nov 95 
SwedExFebta 
SewAank Jul 77 
SwedbankOdta 

Swgdbra* Junta 
SwertXBfcFCbfB 
Sweden Feb 81 

Swede n Jun 98 
S weden Not ta 
Tntyo Kob AwAu»77 
TafaigkiOct Od77 
TntLM Julta 
Taka) Bk Septa 
T groom Od 82 
Toyota MccMarBJ 
Tip* Exlm Dec 98 
LFWJufOO 
UM Ewe Dec 96 
Ubf Euro Feb *7 _ 
UbnMtaEu Marta 
(Ah Fbl How (0 
UnOkafeJuia 

UppscrigDecn 

Urban Mtg Od 98 
Ota Da Baric SOP 02 
Vserita Cur Moral 
VveriRi Car Moral 
.WestpacAng97 
Wartime. Sopta 
.Odta 
Feb 77 

Yokhamo As adbT7 

Yufcane LtdDecM 

Zlan Aust May <n 
OanAuat Aares 
zkmAuriF«b03 
Zkn Aust Aug02 


7M 

74% 

75H 

75% 

97% 

97 


70 


TTH 

mm 

Ml*. 

wtt 

B 

TTH 


98 

98 

92% 

97H 

75 


S 

UB 

S3 

S3 

tn 

811 

U 6 

au 

U2 

855 

819 

BJ6 

056 

Ita 

860 

U. 

M7 

004 

U 2 

835 

052 


Kft 


U 8 

92 


OJB 

U 2 

139 

956 

834 

057 

027 

*33 

134 


MO 

MM 

92% 


OH 

97% 

10M 

99ft 

77ft 


818 

U 1 

u> 

158 

Ut 

035- 

1+5 

as* 

uo 

844 

025 


164 

i.n 

131 


TOOURREADERS 


r*- 

*r~. 




UbC 


.^5 




LfcbAuaB 

Fbl Nv Nov 91 



Lkbl _ 

Mataysla Apr 15 
Itatoyria Decor 

rt f. fiBmi m 

MGYMK. A^ay yj 

Granfeuperp 
FMMarTT 
Si Jun 49 

Bksvn 

Mor 96 
Mttsnt AslJul97 
McrgGrp Jm97 
6MgBk Dai Jan 85 
MuUftricSepII 
MutrfletaaJonB 
Nob Odta 
Nab Jul 9 Jut 77 
NatBkCatodaJdta 
Natinv BkSepK 
Natl Power Od 00 

Natwas Bv DrC49 

Natures SOI Septa 
Katweri AugflB 

NatwertOaoo 
Natwest a Jut 49 
NatwertbMnyta 
Norms* Bv Apt 05 

NabeartcNovta 

tttcMorTB 
NbcFebta 
New ZealnMfei Odta 
NewZMNnMtnjutta 
New Zertad Junta 
New ZeatadMt Od*7 
N 8l Feb 03 
NttFabf* 

Nomro lot Feb 84 
Nerd Giro Dec 02 
Norway Dec 82 
Novo Sari Mar ft 


92% 


84ft 


It’s never been easier 
to subscribe and save 
with our new 
toll free service. 
Just call us today 

at 05-437 437 


^^"™"'^™™lNT^RNATIONAlTECRUITMENT^™^™ , ^™^™ir 

You will find below a listing of employment offers published in last Thursday's International Herald Tribune a 

. . . ; .C." v • . ' • ’« .i, . - • m 1 


REGIONAL ADVISER 

CHILDREN IN ESPACIALLY 

DIFFICULT CIRCUMSTANCES (1+5) 
ABIDJAN, COTE D'IVOIRE 

UNtCEF 

Ref. VN.94.212 

Recruitment G Placement Section UNICEF 

3, United Nations Plaza IH-5F) 

New York, NYI00I7|USA) 

DISTRICT SALES MANAGER 
PRODUCT LINE MANAGER 

SALES ENGINEER 

Health Care Company 

AXIALlRef: 5431) 

27, rue Taitbout 

75009 Paris (France! 

SALES MANAGERAIKRA1NE 

Soft drinks company 

Neumann - Claudia Daeubner 
do Neumann International - 

Guenthergasse 3, A-)090 Vienna (Austria) | 

U^. REGIONAL MANAGER 

— 

Box D. 436 

IHT -92521 Neuilly Cedex (France! 

SECRETAIRE DE DIRECTION 

— 

Box D.434 

IHT -92521 NeuillyCedex (France) 

'■—■hi i iiii'i'i in 1 1 1 mil ■iiiiiii 

| GENERAL MANAGER 

— 

Fat (33-1 130 43 22 62 I I 


CURREXCV AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


® - SABEX- ^ SFA4IPE 

■ " - - - - — MBIiaBD 

FUTURES LIMITED 


* 24 Hour margin based foreign exchange dealing 

* Fast competitive rates with a personalised service 

* Catering only lo professional investors. Fund managers 
and institutions, for their speculative & hedging needs 

* Up to date market information and technical analysis 

* Full futures brokerage in all major markets 

33 Cavendish Square London WIM 9HF 

Reuters Dealing: SABX. Reuters Monitor SABY/Z f+ Daily fax! 
Tel.: (07U412QQ01 Fax: (071)412 0003 
Please call for further Information. 



Commodities 
on the Move 
Time to Speculate? 

Call Philip O'Neill 
Tel.: +44 71 329 3333 
Fax: + 44 71 329 3919 


USD/DEM 3-5 pips DEM/JPY 2-3 pips 


■ 

ECU Future PIC 

*SHa. 

29 Chesham Place 


Belgravia 

IpU u ‘ni JH 

London SW1X8HL 


Tel: +71 245 0088 

%no' J 

Fax; +71 235 6599. 


Member SF A. 

M 


FUTURES & OPTIONS BROKERS 


$32 


| J/ ROUND 
W TURN 

EXECUTION ONLY 


Business Message Center 

Every Wednesday. Contact Philip Oma 
Tel.: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 36, fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office or representative 


Competitive FX spreads with no further costs 
Experience - Security - Analysis - Strategies 
Trading facilities based on margin or company balance sheet 
Direct Dealing 24 Hours - London - Berlin - Copenhagen 
RUBICON +49 30 TeL: 885 9330 / Fax: 882 4266. 


.J^L, I Offer To Professional Traders 
Keystone 800-9674879 us ~~ 
312-207-0117 4 

(a i 


w.V 

t'S 


-2 - . 

*- 

A- 


■V. 

r \ 


wy-_- : 


>iV.. 


Wmw MacvsLL Manaser 
I2D1 InsWIta Cky.Snm 
ft 


O Signal Realtime! US AO 

O Stock & Fuuires Quotes that CONNECT to 100+ applications O 

S O Now in Eurqie O 65500 QUOTTES from just $3 day! O 
O Coll NOW for YOUR free Signal Investment Software Guide & price iisi © 



Call London 44 + (0) 171 231 3556 V 



Q ^^J^ NAGO f EN I Corporation Plc 
_ V ■ London EC2R 8DU 

TcLt 071-865 0800 Fax: 071-972 0970 


MARGT.\ FOREIGN EXCHAXGF 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Kates & Dally Fax Sheet 

Cali far further Information & brochure 


■ looacrotMwcoB ■MCMtkixBBaHnioMeB'wewnitaAi.rooB* ^ 

‘ DAB.T FAX SBVKE far 38 hdurat - Rwriioa bode wi#i ipeaRc cnkw/aita/skip, 

PrCV in pari 6 mort« «ceei SIOO^XXJ, koMta txweartrod lor ootli 5 «innl 
| Subafc fat ZKrtii far USS 1,500,8! 6 rnotAj farUSS 6^00, w I YenfcrSllOOO 

I 'NOTE: EACH HAS FUlMONET-MOtOUAUNTILWi venal UA’i. do xijxncsamAts. 4,0,) 
taMANASB) ACCOl)NI5^g»wnUS$35,000taigbaN CUSTOM PWGUMsfaiYOOTlw^EfeS'V 

X Cal 305-25T47A2 ar SOO-3W-266A - frac305-254-3272 / 




UMITHJ AVAHABM7Y AO NCWI 


(1) fB09) 39.43284 
‘fikphonc fl)( - 


5(809)3938777 


$34691.77 

NET REALIZED PROJTTS 
^RSlttU)DOUNDBBMANA(aMENT 
June 27. 1994THaoum[Ocn3BER 21, 1994 


For further details on bow to place your listing contact: WILL NICHOLSON hi London 
TeL (4*) 71 836 48 02 -Fax: (44) 71 240 2254 

HcralbSEribunc 



% -- 






S4> 





i 























































SZ3 






et 


as* tiTT 

>=?pij ^ 

.S'-JSp 

Ms** 

W « 

?? *jHd 

c. 

r-4^^ 


“>tsr r 


Per- 


* ! 


• -uC -y* | 

>v^ ! 



■»» ■ ! 

i . ': 


Z- ' 


m 

i 


;asie' 


! c n\£ 

! v - 


N 


M W ■ 


soy 



i.»« ? 







Page 9 


CAPITAL markets 


Inflation Worries Spread 
ToU.S. Municipal Market 


Fate of the Dollar Hinges on Fed Policy Decision 



high?. 


HW YORK — Qacem that U.S. inflation is bound to 
as the economy expands has taken a toll not only 
ougoverament securities prices, but on the municipal 
Dono marJcet > where yields have reached four-year 


*“*> “d other institutional 

for sale as thev^SSSh? with lists of municipal bonds 

rorsaie as they tried to raise cash for redemptions. 

°? ““nueipal bonds has added to brokers 
aheafly swollen inventories. According to the Standard & Poor’s 

Corp.’s so-called Blue List, se- 
curities houses held more than 
$2 billion worth of municipal 

that inventories held at that lev- the Treagory bond 
a. inventory volume is consid- -» . 

end high when the Blue list market recently, 
shows more than $1.5 billion — - 


L *T Mili “ uiui 

jporth of securities on hand. 

“No one feds safe that if you buy today that it will be worth 
more the next day,” said Joseph Gallagher, a vice president at 
Caromona Moldy & Co. in New York. 

The abundance of bonds has pushed down prices in the second- 
ary maricetand caused tax-exempt bonds to perform more poorly 
than benchmark government securities. The Bond Buyer 40 gener- 
al obligation bond index showed municipal bonds yielding 7.72 
percent on Friday, the highest since Nov. 11, 1990. Meanwhile, 
the yield on the benchmark 30-year Treasury bond readied 8.16 
percent on Friday. 

Like the government bond market, prices of municipal bonds 
have dropped because of concern that the economy is expanding 
at a p ace that will lead to an acceleration of rnflarinn , which 
di minish es the value of fixed-rate assets. 

Municipal bonds have done worse than benchmark Treasury 
bonds in the past few weeks in part because of the unwinding of 
leveraged positions and a tax-exempt bond marln-t that has 
become more difficult to trade in, said Joseph Deane, who 
m a nag es more than $3 billion in municipa] bonds for the Green- 
wich Investors division of Smith Barney Inc. 

At the same time; investorsjmlled cash from tax-exempt mutual 
funds as the net value of then assets eroded. 

Investors withdrew $532 milli on from municipal bond mutual 
funds in the week ended Wednesday, according to AMG Services, 
an Areata, California, company that trades fund cadi flows. The 
previous week^ investors withdrew $930 nriTlfnn from mntnal 
funds. This was the seventh consecutive week that funds had 
withdrawals. 


P 



THE TRIB 


IntomationaTHetaU Tribune 122 
Wodd Slock Index, composed 121 
of 280 intemaHonaBy invastable 12 q 
stocks from 25 countries, 119 
' compiled by Bloomberg 

■ Business News. 1,8 

117 

Weekending November 4, 116 
Jaa^K?m 115 

MMmMb 


World Index 




F M T W T 

Worth Ameri c a 



F M T W T 

Lathi A merica 


l 100 



Industrial Bscto— /Weekend dose 

«IUt UOMK * 


tiMK want 


. Energy, iifijyi tag - 2.10 
12753 12BS7 -051 


Ftaanca 11&3011&13 *0-15 

iStevtou 119.00119.42 -028 


capital Goods 116.74118.78 -1.73 

ftgyt Materials 135.1013857 -2.78 

Consumer Goods 10435 105.43 -152 

Miscellaneous 124.36125.48 -089 


hdtax trucks US. rtfer w turns ot stocks sc Tokyo, Mbw Tort, Londo n, an t 
ftniMjftn jbndntia, Amatrtk. PdflkaB. Brazil, Canada, ChBa, Dt n wrt 
HorwKong, Italy, Itadco. ttnnurtmda, Now 

'Tatar $tafs¥ixk art Lcndan, tfw rides g composed rfffia 2 Q rop issues tn mm 
atf wi» to Si*tmliysa>eteawg**srf. 


O Wnowfiond HwddTpbtfia 


CURRENCY RATES 





Nov. 4 

■-a? &;■* si sts »• “ s- 

g® J2 £2* TU5t Mia QJB5 HBH JOI- 

£5£t S 35.- s SS- S 

usmw uns -r' vm . S2 5! SS* So — 

«Mtte «a w u» i® w “ S2 22i5£ wsu-* 

Mira ’ uu uaB iran aus — w* **■* v “" .TV, 

HWTWttel— " VU* u» JJfB L£U0 14)1 3LU L393 

SSt*“ as um Si btw m SL 

V-SSSSSS --iS'S- 
■ffi,V--3'K"S 3 SS2 3 S- - 


tfl 

Mk» . Mrt Ckirar rtr* ^ 

* wiw vm uraikWac. ms> 

«a AMI W HWSKWaS 7J29S MZiaMaa* 

jatteMlK am uras-hme ST™ % 

:.a.. mo a n ra p — 31* 

-- 4MH-. wort she*. U» KSS 

-’Jbls' tow* Mara sums »»» 

«a.rat*ra ' Motor.T*» mo *»■* 1 



cvmncy 
s. AIT. mad 
SLlCflr.wea 
Swad-lam 
TolwraB 

Thai raid 
TW«*snra 
UAErtiwn 
vwMz.raav. 


Per* 

ISIS 

7WJ0 
7 JUS 
2&04 
2*J3 
25964. 

MU 

WJ7 


iMnr S *rr tvray 

... teR ,J * Cizmilk'B tlnirm- ™ 

-«» UW Jiaaaraawa wm 

******.'■ UW .ft***, 

• »y h /pfMrMfr TftfSttrn j f itdamer Bos* UnorafcflJ®^ p ^* . ^ cooraiz 

«« MSCfU- east st Tctso CTrtroi: *"«*«*« ^ 
RsotensnBMP. 


By Carl Gewirtz 

Intenunonai Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The dollar is 
poised either to rally or col- 
lapse. Analysts say that the out- 
come depends entirely on 
whether U5. interest rates arc 
raised by more than the half- 
perceatage-point increase that 
is already widely expected with- 
in the next few day^. 

Among those analysts who 
have been predicting a rise of 
half a percentage point, or 50 
basis points, in the cost of over- 
night money, the view now is 
that an increase of at least 75 
basis points is needed to con- 
vince the market that the Unit- 
ed States is serious about con- 
taining inflation and defending 
its currency. 

The next official move on in- 
terest rates is expected to occur 
anytime after federal elections 
on Tuesday and the policy- 


making meeting of the Federal 
Reserve Board on Nov. 15. 

Knowingly or not, the U.S. 
Treasury dramatically in- 
creased the stakes in what the 
Fed does by the unorthodox 
style of the interventions it or- 
dered the Federal Reserve Bank 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

of New Yoik to conduct last 
week to support the dollar. The 
Fed alone sets interest rales, but 
exchange rate policy is a politi- 
cal decision. 

The unwritten rules of the 
game call for intervention to be 
coordinated with other central 
banks, to be timed to catch 
speculators wrong-footed and 
to be backed by policy changes. 
The first two conditions were 
not met 

At the Treasury's instruction, 
the New York Fed spent an 


estimated $2 billion in repeated 
single-handed forays Wednes- 
day and Thursday to lift the 
dollar above its postwar low of 
96.10 yen and a near two-year 
low of 1.4910 Deutsche marks 

The only other central bank 
in the market was the Bank of 
Japan, which has been interven- 
ing virtually daily for most of 
this year trying to slow the ap- 
preciation of the yen. While the 
German and French central 
banks welcomed the Fed’s ac- 
tion, concerted intervention is 
seen as unlikely until Washing- 
ton takes more aggressive mea- 
sures to restore confidence. 

The Fed’s intervention was 
conducted as European mar- 
kets closed — when trading vol- 
ume is normally moderate. This 
enabled the Fed to lift the dol- 
lar from its mid-week lows to a 
closing level on Friday of 97.45 
yen and 1.5140 DM. 


The strategy also was flawed 
because there were no large 
short positions in the market. 
These are speculative positions 
taken by borrowing dollars to 
sell with the intention of buying 
them back, at a profit, after the 
dollar has dropped. Such specu- 
lators are easily frightened ont 
of their positions by interven- 
tion and their rush to get out of 
the market can create a buying 
bandwagon that feeds on itself. 
But currency dealers agreed 
that there had been no buildup 
of such short positions and 
therefore no bandwagon effect 

Because two key ingredients 
deemed necessary for success 
were mining , the intervention 
has fanned expectations for a 
substantial policy change — a 
larger rate increase by the Fed 
than had been earlier expected. 

“In the minion of market 
participants,* says BHF Bank 


in Frankfurt, “a dear signal 
that the growing danger of in- 
flation is being fought necessi- 
tates an interest-rate signal ex- 
ceeding the 50 basis points 
already anticipated. Only a 
dear signal would support the 
recovery of the dollar. ” 

Without such a signal, agrees 
Joe Prendergast at Paribas Cap- 
ital Markets in London, the 
UJ>. intervention “hi doomed to 
failure." 

Brendan Brown, at Mitsubi- 
shi Finance in London, warns 
that an increase of only half a 
percentage point will be taken 
as a signal 'Tor a big sell-off of 
the dollar unless there are big 
bints that there will be another 
half-point increase in Decem- 
ber. 

Jim O’Neill, Swiss Bank 
Corp.'s London-based analyst 
who is a long-standing pessi- 
mist on the dollar’s outlook. 


agrees that a Fed increase of 
more than a half-point would 
c u l m the currency market. An 
increase of one percentage 
point by the end of the year 
“would make me think that 
we’ve seen the bottom for a 
considerable number of 
months" in the value of the dol- 
lar, he says. 

However, Mr. O’Neill says be 
believes that an increase of 50 
basis pants — and further 
downward pressure on the dol- 
lar — “is most likely." 

The problem is that under the 
direction of Alan Greenspan, 
the Fed has only once moved 
rales by more than 50 basis 
points — when it cut rates 75 
baas points after the stock mar- 
ket collapse in October 19S7. 
While a big move now might 
calm the currency and bond 

See DOLLAR, Page U 


McDonald’s Launches McDelivery 


By Bruce Weber 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The ultimate in con- 
venience food is apparently no longer 
convenient enongh Accelerating down 
the fast-food superhighway, McDonald's 
is about to begin making home and of- 
fice deliveries from 40 of its Manhattan 
restaurants, with orders taken over the 
shone at a single computerized clearing- 


Be ginnrng next week, h will be possi- 
ble to call in to a sort of burger hot line 
and have a double bacon cheeseburger or 
a fish sandwich delivered to your door 
from whatever McDonald’s is closest 

McDonald’s Corp_ which began mak- 
ing hamburgers in 1955, now has more 
than 13,000 restaurants in 65 countries. 
Ironically, the ubiquitous restaurants are 
now apparently not ubiquitous enough, 
at least not in New York City, where 
delis and restaurants of every stripe now 
regularly deliver their goods. 

McDonald's Corp. and other compa- 
nies have experimented with delivery 
networks in smaller markets, and in di- 
vidual fran chis e owners in Manhattan 
and elsewhere have provided their own 
delivery service. 

But this is the fast time that McDon- 
ald’s has tried to link such a large num- 
ber of outlets. 


The first 10 restaurants will be on line 
beginning at 8 AM. Monday, with 28 
more joining what a company represen- 
tative called “our new McDelivery ser- 
vice” the following Monday: two new 
restaurants, which are to open by the end 


'We’re trying to 
recapture some of the 
business we lose when it 
rains, when it snows, or 
when it’s 105 degrees. 9 

David C. Hawthorne, president 
of McDonald’s Manhattan Delivery 
Service 


of the year, also will be part of the burger 
network. 

The service, to operate from S A.M. to 
8 P.M^ is aimed more at people who are 
at work than those who are at home. 

"We’re trying to recapture some of the 
business we lose when it rains, when it 
snows, or when it’s 105 degrees and no- 
body wants to go outside." said David C. 
Hawthorne, president of McDonald’s 
Manhattan Delivery Service, a consor- 


tium of franchise owners who are operat- 
ing the service with financial support 
from McDonald’s Corp. 

The hub of the delivery operation — 
burger central, as it were — is a mid town 
office newly outfitted with rows of com- 
puter terminals. For security reasons, the 
company asked that the location of the 
computer center, like the ingredients in 
its fazned secret sauce, r emain undis- 
closed. 

The way it is supposed to work is that 
each caller will first be asked for an 
address; the operator will plug die ad- 
dress into the computer, which will re- 
spond with the location and the menu of 
the closest participating franchise. 

The caller will then give the order, 
which will be relayed by modem to the 
restaurant, where it will appear on a 
printer, to be prepared and dispatch ed. 

The order must be worth a minim um 
of $10. There will be no delivery charge, 
and deliveries should be made within 
Half an hour of the can, although Mc- 
Donald’s is mindful that this is a new 
service and is making no guar antees. 

The delivery people, who are to be 
regular McDonald's employees, will 
travel only on foot or by bicycle. Mr. 
Hawthorne said keeping food hot would 
not be a problem because it would be 
carried in thermal bags. 


Growth Saps 
Job-Creation 
Effort, EU Frets 


DEC Tries a New Form of Networking 


By Laurie Flynn 

New York Tines Service 

NEW YORK — If infor mati on systems 
managers have learned one thing, it's that 
PCs don’t crane cheap — even considering 
today’s fire sale prices. 

Maintenance and repairs, as wdl as the 
constant need to upgrade software, quickly 
adds to the oost And there is the expense 
of employee training and dealing with 
frayed nerves when the computers mal- 
function, as they inevitably do. 

But Digital Equipment Corp. thinks it 
has the answer When it comes to using 
PCs on a network, forget the ordinary 
personal computer. 

With an announcement this week. Digi- 
tal hopes to sdl the weald on its new line of 
Mnltia computers, which have been de- 


signed to run in complex situations involv- 
ing a variety of PCs and operating systems. 

Mnltia, Digital says, makes centralized 
management a breeze because everything 
is built in — yet the user sees only a 
collection of innocuous-looking icons. 
And instead of needing more than one 
workstation or PC support technicians 
have only one machine to contend with. 

Based on Microsoft's Windows NT pro- 
gram, the Multia line can run both off-the- 
shelf Windows applications as weO as pro- 
grams written for the Unix operating syst on . 

“TMs is not the kind of product that is 
going to blow things away," said Michael 
Goulde, editor in chief at the Patricia Sey- 
bold Group, “but it’s easy." Mr. Goulde 
worked as a consultant with Digital on the 
project. 


Larry Cabrinety, a Digital vice presi- 
dent, said, "It gives the systems manager 
complete control." Maintenance costs are 
also lower. According to him, the annua] 
cost to maintain the Multia is only about 
$120. “If you want to do networked com- 
puting, this is the most effective way." 

As often happens with Digital’s prod- 
ucts, analysts praise its technical merits. 
But the company of late has had its share 
of problems translating strong technology 
into sales. 

The other major feature erf the new plat- 
form — the fact that it supports many 
operating systems — is also a boon to 
weary information managers. Digital offi- 
cials say. 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Union is struggling to keep 
its war on unemployment alive 
as the economic recovery less- 
ens the urgency for action, EU 
officials said. 

EU finance ministers wall re- 
view two major reports here 
Monday criticizing their gov- 
ernments for being too timid in 
cutting payroll taxes, promot- 
ing more flexible working-time 
arrangements and developing 
new job opportunities in such 
areas as local services and the 
environment 

The reports warn that eco- 
nomic growth, although solidly 
established, is not enough to 
reduce the bloc’s 10.7 percent 
jobless rate. 

“Progress so far remains far 
from sufficient" to meet the EU 
goal of creating 15 million jobs 
and reducing unemployment to 
6 percent to 8 percent by 2000. 
says one report by the Europe- 
an Commission, the Union’s ex- 
ecutive body. A copy of the re- 
port was obtained by ibe 
International Herald Tribune. 

Separately, arguments over 
money continue to bog down a 
companion EU initiative to 
boost competitiveness by braid- 
ing 11 cross-border road and 
rail networks, with Germany. 
Britain and the Netherlands ef- 
fectively vetoing any borrowing 
scheme that could jump-start 
construction, officials said. 

A letter to finance ministers 
from Henning Christ ophersen, 
the commissioner in charge of 
the networks, said project plan- 
ning was “far from complete," 
but added that ministers should 


begin considering whether to 
make equity investments or 
long-term loans to meet some of 
the projected 35 J billion Euro- 
pean currency units ($44.7 bil- 
lion) in costs this decade. 

The warning on joblessness 
conies as strong exports and in- 
vestment are brightening Eu- 
rope’s economic outlook. 

Output in the £LTs 12 mem- 
ber nations, which fell by 0.5 
percent last year, is projected to 
rise by about 2 percent this year 
and up to 3 percent in 1995. 

The report credits the recov- 
ery to measures aimed at curb- 
ing government deficits and re- 
straining pay increases. And 
growth so far has had some im- 
pact on dole lines, reducing un- 
employment from a postwar 
peak of 1 1 percent in May. 

But commission officials fear 
that progress will lull political 
leaders into complacency and 
spell the death of the White 
Paper on Growth, Competitive- 
ness and Employment. 

Jacques Delors, the commis- 
sion president, made the paper 
the centerpiece of EU policy- 
making last fall and will pres; 
for more action in his valedic- 
tory address at the Union’s 
summit meeting in Essen, Ger- 
many, next month. 

Europe's jobs problem has 
not diminished The recession is 
to blame for fewer than 2 in iO 
of the more than 17 million un- 
employed. Of the rest, nearly 
half have been out of work fc: 
more than a year. 

Despite the problem, the 
commission report found that 
member countries came up 
short in the seven policy areas 
targeted by the White Paper. 


London Notebook 


Clouds Clearing for Industry 


Over the next five years British manufac- 
turing — something whkdx many pundits 
have long and loudly claimed bordered on an 
oxymoron — is set fra its greatest growth 
spurt in nearly three decades. 

That is the central theme of a new forecast 
f ro m the London Business School's Center for 
Economic Forecasting due out on Monday. 
The report envisions industrial growth averag- 
ing 43 percent each year from 1994 through 
1998 — more than enough to reverse the de- 
cades-kmg s&fe of the manufacturing sector. 

Since the end of World War H, British 
n ipTtwfafiffirhig has oily once beat that expect- 
ed, pace of expansion — from 1964 to 1968. 

Andrew Seatance, the senior researc h fello w 
who was one of the report’s authors, stressed 
that it would be hard for industry to do any- 
thing but prosper. “If manufacturing cannot 
do wdl in the conditions we have now, they 
must be ddngstOTethmg vezy wron&" he said. 

He stud the condition known as “B ritish 
disease;" characterized by everything from 
massively poor labor relations to low produc- 
tivity, was a thing of the past. 


Docklands Look More Entidiig 

London’s troubled property market is firm- 
ing up even in the most unlikely of places. 
Last^ week the good news even caught np with 
the massive and unprofitable Ca n ary Wharf 
offi ce development in London’s docklands. 

Sir Peter Levene, the bead of Canary 
Wharf, announced that 350,000 square feet of 
vacant space had been rented and thai negoti- 
ations fra- the lease of an additional half 
wirTtinn square feet were well advanced. 

Property analysts say that the owners of 
large office blocks in hard-to-get-to and even 
harder-to-reni locations tike the doddanos 

are al last benefiting from the dearth of office 

construction in the past four yeare- 
“There is increasing evidence of a shortage 
of new space in buildings of more than 
100,000 square feet,” said Peter Evans, re- 


search director at Defaenham Thoipe, a prop- 
erty agent. 

New office space will not be on the market 
for at least two or three years, giving projects 
like 43 mini on square foot Canary Wharf a 
window of opportunity. Mr. Evans said. 


Jmcy Tidbits for Data Junkies 

There is good news in the offing for those 
who have always wondered about Britain’s 
output of everything from yogurt and cheese 
to rear view mirrors, coffins and even saw- 
dust. Such juicy statistical tidbits and much, 
much more will soon be available on CD- 
ROM courtesy of a newjoint venture between 
Britain's doyens of data, the Central Statisti- 
cal Office, and a private market research firm. 

Late this month, the government will launch 
“UK Markets,” a new venture with Taylor 
Nelson AGB, one of Britain’s largest market 
res ear ch companies. In the process, Whitehall 
will demonstrate that in spite of its now aban- 
doned [dans to privatize the postal service its 
affection for the private sector bmps on. 

For devotees of data, the news will be a 
mixed bag. While Taylor Nelson promises 
more “user friendly” reports, offerings that 
for the first time will include graphs and even 
commentary, such niceties will come at a 
price. “In the past, these reports have been 
add at prices that did not even cover the cost 
of printing,” said John Cunnin gham, the head 
of publications at Taylor Nelson. No more. 

"The information will be more expensive," 
said Mr. Omnmgham, who hastened to point 
out that most of the data will be sold to deep- 
pocketed companies and institutions, not in- 
dividuals. 

Taylor Nelson will be churning out 97 
a nnu al reports and 35 quarterly reports cov- 
ering British imports, exports and manufac- 
turing all broken down mto 5,000 different 
individual products. 

Erik Ipsen 



THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation. 
Seif-winding chronometer 
in 18 k gold. 

Swiss made since 1848. 





JIL 


-* n 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 























































































































* 


U*jjJ J, f 




Vs 

£5 

??PC : '- 
:.^-;i 5 . ' - i 
•sr. ; "S *i 

*si* '*• •’* 

* • S. ' R 

.‘■t: *».■« 

"5s^ =:£'£ 


•.^r -ss 




usSI 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 11 


New Internation al R« 

_Compaedby Laurence. Desvfett^ 

Jnutr Amount • Cora. PHc® 

(mffions) ** Prtc ® end 

_ ' " ' IVMk 

****** RateHofaw 

^ 5S 1999 0» 100 - 

Sanwu Finance Aruba $400 2004 K TOO ~ 


Issues 


wa itfr. . 

Irish Permanent 


DM400 1997 Vi 99.925 — 


inm refinement £100 7997 Olo m _ 

Ffat^Coupwra ~ — 

2000 8 «- 

-Andduda 

Crrft Suige (Lond on) $300 MM gw innuK ^ 

HmJ^Rrfnd $250 1997 714 IOIjw 99^ 


Ow 2000 a 100.77 98J0 Und<ni7.HnMb si« HM. fcnkj 


W» 1999 7* 101.1J 9»X0 


»50 1997 zho 81.,« 79* 

DgFA finance • DM750 1999 7% lQlVi _ 

Fori Credit Europe Dm 200 1999 714 102.13 — 

Ufcf-Ameriean DM300 2004 7% 100.541 “ 

Dewetopment Bonk 

m. 100,000 1996 11 101 27 ioo.u 

QwStLocdde m.100,000 1997 ITjo 102^15 — 


m. 100,000 1996 11 101.27 ioaio 


ECU 150 1998 814 101.77 — 
ECU TOO 1998 8V& 101.269 _ 


Bayensdie ECU 100 1998 8 !A 101.269 — 

HypatheJcen und 

Wechsd Bank 

General Bedric ecu 100 1998 8 101X65 99 J 5 

Capital Gorpi. - 

New South Wales Aw$100 1997 414 88.161 — 

Treasury Gorp. 

Robobanfc Austrafia a«$75 1996 914 101.22 — 

Toyota finance AwSlOO 1997 9% 100^3 — 

Ausfrcfiu 

Gofinlitfl Y 15,000 2004 5X0 100 — 

Nomura Bank bit! y 16,000 — — 100 — 

Santander Infl Y 30,000 2000 4.70 100.22 — 

Equlty-Unfcod ~ 

Fraice One Pubfic $160 2001 open 100 — 

Company 


toofleaxl at 99X1. NanopBgfcte. Foot 27k {C5 Fiat BmtonJ 
Rooflerad at 99X31. NnncaUabta Few 1H% {Deutsche Bonlc) 

bofferad at 99495. Nanadabto. Fins 1*% yjP. Monjan 
SecuritiB&J 

Yield 7.204% Reoffored at 79.94. NoncoHabU. Proceeds $200 
ra in t v Fees 1%% [Lahrn an Brothers Ml) 

Reoffmd at 9914. Nancoflabie. Feet 2%. (Conrarabankl 
Reoffared at 99.93. NoncuSpble. Fees 27k [Dusdner Bank) 
Rooffered at 99.114 Noncaftdde. Rees 1V% (Deutsche Bonk.) 

Nonadobie. Fungible with outstanding issue, robing total 
□mowtfto 250 biBon ire. Fees 114%. (Credfo bafanaj 

NonoaSafale. Fungible with auMandhg issue, raising total 
amount to 250 UKon be. Fees 1W% (Cnxfiks HdBanaj 

RMffiered at 9977. NonaoflaUe. Fees 1H% Swiss Bank 
CwpJ 

ReoHwed at 99X94. Nonadabie. Foes 1H% (todays de 
ZeehWedd) 


Reoffered at 99X4. Noncalofaie. Fees 1W% (Uiion Bank of 
Switzerland.) 

Semia n nually. Noncdlable. Fees 1H% Denominations 
AttsSIOXOO. (Nomura Inrt) 

Nonadabh. Fees 116% (Swiss Bonk Corpj 

Nonadcdsle. Fees 1 V4% (Hambras Bank.) 

Nonadahle. Fees not dhdosed. Denominaliom 10 mBon 
yen. {Damea Europe.) 

fanae sp£i into S tranches, maturi ng be tween 1998 ond 2005, 
with coupons ranging from 4 to 4.97% Nonadable. Fees not 
d bdos ed . Danoobiations 100 miKon yea (Nomura tnfL] 


Nonosdable. Fees not tfackned. 
yea (Dcbwd Europe.) 


Denominatiom 10 million , 


Teco Bedric & 
Machinery 


$100 2004 2H 100 — 


Coupon indarfed at 41S to 446% Nonm U cMe- Redeemable at 
maturity m baht. C o n wetl ib la of an expected 8 to 12% 
premium. Tenm to be set Nov. 21. Fees2H% Denom i nation* 
SI 0X00. (PbribtB Capttd Mexico) 

Redeemable at 171.19 at maturity 8 not oonvsrted. Convert- 
Ut at TV5J0 per shtre, a 3% premium, and at 1)26X55 per 
doltx. Fries 2K% Denominaiions J10X0Q. (Bcxdayi de ZoeiB 
WeddJ 


China Turns Testy on GATT 


.■» Agent* Fiance-Prase 

BEIJING ; — Qiim wamed 
Sunday that it could become an 
uncontrolled “gorilla” that., 
trampled ove£gtobal trade rales^.- 
if the lhrited StAtes.c ontinue d - 
to Mock its re-entry to GATT, 
the China Daily said. ' 
“Denial of GATT access 
could torn China into a 900- 
pound gorilla unbound by the 
marshaling forces of a world 
trading system,” the China Dai- 
ly Business Weekly quoted a 
senior trade scholar at Bering’s 
University of International 
Business and Economics, Chn 
Xiangyin, assaying. 

Mr. Chn’s warning was ech- 
oed by the assistant foreign 
trade minister, Lang Yongtu. 

*The U.S. should take stock 
erf its medium- and long-term 
commercial benefits in China, 
not just the short-term ones,’' 
Mr. Long was quoted as saying. 

China was a founding mem- 
ber of the General Agreement 
cm Tariffs and Trade in 1947 
but withdrew after the Commu- 
nists c ame to power in 1949. 

It applied to rejoin in 1986 


and has been pushing to be ac- 
cepted by the end erf the year, in 
rime to become a founding 
member of the World Trade Or- 
ganization that is to replace. 
GATT is January. 

Its application has been 
blocked by Washington, which 
rejects Bering’s demands to be 
readmitted as a developing na- 
tion and is calling for greater 
trade transparency. 

Mr. Long and Mr. Chu 
stressed that any delay would 
hit the United States and the 
other trade partners hardest. 

“As decentralization takes 
root in China, it wffl be hard far 
the central government to con- 
trol localities with international 
rules if China is out of GATT,” 
the report cited Mr. Chu as say- 
ing. “This will make it difficult 
for businesses from the U.S. 
and other countries to deal with 
Chinese partners.” 

Mr. Long also stressed that 
China would not allow reentry 
to be used to cripple Chinas 
infant industries or risk letting 
foreign competition create mas; 


sive, destabilizing unemploy- 
ment 

■ Some Trading Curtailed 

Beijing banned unauthorized 
trading in foreign exchange mid 
futures Sunday and promised 
heavy fines for repeal offend- 
ers, Reuters reported. 

Major newspapers published 
an order issued jointly by four 
government departments, in- 
cluding the Ministry of Public 
Security. 

The order said such trading 
with “illegal dements” outside 
China had led to a loss in for- 
eign exchange and disputes in- 
volving large sums. 

It said that all such trading 
must be approved by the Secu- 
rities Regulatory Commission 
and the Stale A dminis tration of 
Foreign Exchange Control. 

The decree said firms in- 
volved in illegal foreign-ex- 
change and futures business 
would be strictly investigated 
and shut down. Those winch 
continued to do business would 
be heavily fined. 


(Mm Payrolls Soar , Pushing Prices 


Bloomberg Busmas Newt 

BiEDING — Wage payments in Chinese cities 
rocketed 81.7 percent in the first nine months of 
i the ye®; helping push year-to-year inflation to a 
six-year High, the official China Daily Business 
WeeHy reported Sunday. 

From January to September, more than 413.2 
bflE on ynau.XS4S^ billion) was paid out m 
wa ges,- the paper said, citing figures from the 
State Staris&cs Bureau. 

Economists say excessive wage increases have 
fed China’s inflation. Consumer prices in Sep- 
tember were 27.4 percent higher than m Septan- 
ber~I993 

' Wages paid by statfrowned businesses rwe 
917 percent, to 325 3 billion yuan during the 
nine month period. 


The permanent payroll rose by 63,000 individ- 
uals, to 101.6 miHion. 

S tate -run companies employ another 33 mil- 
lion people under contract or as temporary work- 
ers. 

Wages at collective enterprises rose 16J5 per- 
cent, to 67 2 billion yuan. 

Some 12,000 extra people were hired, taking 
the total to 33.5 nrillScHi. 

Foreign-funded and private enterprises took 
on the largest number of new workers, addmg 
171,000 people, to take the overall total to 5.6 
milli on. 

As a result, their combined wage bill soared 
112.8 percent, to 218 billion yuan. 


BA Draining Distraction short cover 

USAir Debacle to Bury Its Strong Figures Gum May Broaden AkUneDsi^igs 


Oyer frmonfh Ubor. Gotiobfe at par m 1997. Fess not 
cfadawdL (Dradner Bank) 

boerest wiB be K mar 6-tnomh Ubor until 1999, whan osua is 
aXabteatpar.iherflaflvrHiaw.FMsnaldbdOMdETonami- 
nohara 550,000. (Samra tn>'L| 

0«ar Smonlti Ubor. Noncedlable. Increased from 300 mfion 
morta. Fees 1)4% (JJ.AAygmj 

Over 3-awnSh Libor, Reoffer od at 99X1 Noncalofale. Fees 
035% Denominations £10.000. (Nofwrt Ctyitol Mgrtafrj 


DOLLAR: Fate Hinges on Sbse of Fed's Rate Move 


y C Mta ac d fron Page 9 

markets, some analysts say they 
fcait cooki unsettle the stock 


; : Amdy5ts 'at J.P. Morgan & 
Co. scefteFed raismg rales 50 
-bask pnrnis Nov. 15 and signal- 
Hj^its inteat for another half- 
^pcin^ indrcaai at. its . 'Dec. 20 
wtetshi. to-' ^Bnjwn ai^ ^Kfitsubi- 
JfeiSfookingfor 75basis points 
Hcfsl Ii ccd another 25 by the 


*W^re jtow in a watershed 
cg t ir u o mart,” says Andres 
Pwboy at CS Fust Bo^on in 
Leasdo j ^wilh the dollar poised 

?aaia;!fe^Fed , .acts F but an in* 

ffl^;bf^y-50 bas^points 

&uH, many analysts ques- 
imn-vdtetho-shfi fenuction to 


intervene was aimed simply at 
avoiding headlines about a art- 
lapsing doflar on Section Day 
Tuesday or at trying to create a 
favorable enviromDent for tins 
week’s sale of $29 bilhon of 
Treasury notes — or both. 

“The ‘devil theory’ making 
♦he rounds," confides one ana- 
lyst. “is that the Treasury’s ami 

ii to hold the dollar through the 

election and the auctions and 
then let it go, blammg the col- 

ssrrssrs?* 

canvfctory in the congressional 

fi *As C fOr expectations thatan 
iuCTcase of more than 50 bass 
Sis now nee^.to^* 
Semarket, Albert Wqmlowo:, 
an adviser at First Boston In- 
vestment Mxnagementm New 
York, comments that such 

^ “r rtjrK 

happens." 


He points out that “the deci- 
sion to intervoie is not a joint 
decision of the Treasury and the 
Fed, and one shouldn’t assume 
there is ajeant game plan.” 

Paul Cherikow, London- 
based analyst at Union Bank of 
Switzerland and long-standing 
optimist on the dollar’s out- 
look, heartily disagrees that 
there’s a need for a big increase 
in rales. “There’s no evidence j 
that the Fed isn’t doing the | 
right firing to restrain inflation. 
My own feding is that 50 basis 
points is more than sufficient. 
The Fed shouldn’t be obliged to 
satisfy ihe market vigilantes' 
lust for higher rates until there's 
dear evidence it’s necessary." 

But Christopher Iggo at 
rtin w Manhattan in New Y oik 


QlSaglCW. I1V. wiu — 

risk of a “rmgor decline” and 
“significant turmoil” in the 
bond and currency markets if 
the Fed increases rates by only 
50 basis points. 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British Airways is widely ex- 
pected to get another harsh reminder of the perils 
of its much ballyhooed amibitions to create a 
truly global airline Tuesday when it presents 
figures that are forecast to be dazzling but which 
will be quickly overlooked. 

The reason is simple. For all BA’s success in 
driving down costs and growing its business, 
investors remain preoccupied with the fate of its 
5400 million investment in deeply troubled 
USAir Group Inc. 

BA got a nasty jolt from across the Atlantic 
just two weeks ago when USAir announced 
third-quarter operating losses of $151 million. 

Analysts increasingly wonder 
how long its patienee can hold. 

bri n g in g total losses in the last five years to 
nearly EL5 billion. BA shares sank nearly 2 
percent in one day alone. 

Analysts increasingly wonder how long BA's 
patience can hold. ‘T think that they will finally 
have to bite the bullet and write off Lb dr stake,” 
said (me analyst who declined to be named. 
“They have got to get this out erf the way so that 
the market can get back to focusing on the good 
news.” 

For British Airways a writeoff would be an 
embarrassing setback in its plan to establish a 
global airline network. Those ambitions have 
seen it take large equity stakes in everything from 
USAir and Qantas to small airlines in Germany 
and France. 

It is the largest and most important of those 
investments that continues to plague BA. Five 
weeks ago, USAir added injury to what had 
technically only been insult by suspending divi- 
dend payments on the preferred shares held by 
BA and others — a move that would cost BA £25 
million (540 million) if it were to continue for a 
year. 

Investors are not amused. “They have put 
£275 million of their shareholders’ funds into an 
airline that arguably does not have a future,” 
groused one analyst. He noted that USAir, the 
sixth largest U.S. airline and the one with the 
highest costs in the industry, is still at logger- 
heads with its unions. As such, he said, it “is not 
even at the beginning of the cost-cutting 
process." 


Many analysts still laud the underlying logic 
of the tie-up. They note that it gives BA a cruoil 
enttee to America, the world’s biggest airline 
market BA itself has forecast a £70 million boost 
to its bottom line as a result of additional traffic 
generated by back-to-back connections with 
USAir flights and of cost savings on things NVp 
joint maintenance facilities. 

Elsewhere, BA’s investments present some- 
thing of a mixed bag. Qantas, in which BA has 
held a 25 percent stake since last year, is consid- 
ered a net contributor to BA’s bottom line. 
Meanwhile BA’s money-losing 49 percent stakes 
in Fiance's TAT and the German carrier Deut- 
sche BA seem to be slowly turning around. In the 
last year, for instance, BA has managed to help 
TAT cut its unit costs by 30 percent 

For British Airways itself, the first half of the 
year is widely seen as having been extremely 
good. 

“The figures will show that BA continues to be 
one of the most successful airlines in the world,” 
said Chris Avery, an analyst at Paribas Capital 
Markets. He predicted pretax profit for the sec- 
ond quarter of £240 millioii, compared wiLh £172 
million in the like period last year. “Traffic 
growth and profitability will continue to be at 
the leading edge of the industry,” he said. 

Analysts see a major tussle looming between 
British Airways and Eurostar, the train service 
which will link London with Paris and Brussels. 
That long-delayed service is to run two trains a 
day service through the Channel tunnel to both 
Paris and Brussels starting next week. 

. But by next summer EuroStar expects to be up 
to a full 30 trains a day. 

For British Airways, which operates 24 flights 
a day from London to Paris — the world’s 
busiest international air route — the competition 
will be fierce. 

BA is pinning its hopes on the fact that many 
people, especially at the London end, may find it 
far easier and more convenient to get to the 
airport than to the train station. To tip the 
balance further in its favor, BA is spoidmg £80 
million to upgrade its Euro Club business class 
service, upgrades that range from wider seats and 
spiffier passenger lounges to valet parking. 

Still that may not be enough. "If we have to do 
something, we will most likely downsize our 
aircraft on those routes,” said David Sndling, a 
BA spokesman. 

— ERIKIPSEN 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Nov. 7-11 


A schodub of this wok's economic and 
Bnsnaal warns, compiled for the Interna- 
tional Hereto Tribune by Bloomberg Bust- 
ness News 

Asla-Pacfflc 

• Now. 7 Mulboumu Australia & New 
Zealand Bank's Oaoter job vacancy sur- 
vey 

Sydney September money supply re- 
port, including figures on housing lending 
and business investment 
Bangladesh National Solidarity Day 
holiday. 

Hang Koag Second-quarter gross do- 
mestic product estimates. 

Tokyo October automobile imports. 
September ma chine tool adere. 

Kusta Lumpur Kuala Lumpur lntama- 
tfona) Airport to armooncawlnning bid lor 
. construction of i#a ln iBrarhaa^fl^8op., 
Taipei October export sties. ' ~ 
Earnings ex p ected Stall, lshizuka 
Glass, Minolta. Nfcpon Sarao, Nippon Ex- 
press. Osaka Sanso. BHonogi, Tenaga 
NasianaL Toho Rayon. Toyn&j, Wake- 
moto Pharmaceutical. Yrsuato Transport, 
a Mov. 8 Jakarta Senior Officiate 
Maao n g IVol Asia-PacMe Economic Co- 
operation. through Nov. 10- 
a An. 8 Pakistan Iqbal Day hoDday. 
Ea r nings expected Amada, DesSo Stoat, 
MteuOshi Oil Mitsubishi Steel Mitsubi- 
shi Rayon. National House. News Corp.. 
DBton Cement Tafceda Chemical, Teijin. 
Tbel. Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical. Ye- 
nKCake-HoneyiMfi. 

• Nov. 10 Sydney October employ- 
ment report and average weekly wages 
report lor three months ending August 
Tokyo Omaha- bank landing and de- 

pfrff i ftl 1 

Eandngo ex p ected Kanebo. KOO. Au- 
bobecs 7. Mtsubishi Estate. Mitsubishi 
Kasel Mppon Chemical Tala Iran & Steel 
eMair.ii Jakarta Mini ste ria l meeting 
ol Asia-Pacillc E c onomi c Cooperation, 
through Nov. 12. 

Wsmieiten October food price index. 
Earnings expected AoW International. 
BandO Chemical, Boso OR & Fat. Fuji 
Heavy industry, Kansai Pam Kawasaki 
Kman, KawasaM Steel Kobe steel and 
Nttshin Steel, Konica. Marumi. Mazda 
Motor*. MistuJ OSK Lines. Mtsubiahl Mo- 


tore. Mitsui Toaiau. Mitsui Home, Mitsui 
Mining, Mitsui Fudosan, Navix Line, Nip- 
pon Paint Nippon steel Chemteo, Nip- 
pon ZOon. Nippon Flour, Itippon Yusen, 
Mppon Meet Packer, Nippon Steel, NKK, 
Onoda Cement Rohm. Sanyo Chemical 
Sega Enterprises. Shows Line. Stow 
Brand MIX, Sumitomo Metal. Sumitomo 
Salks Chemlcd, Sumitomo Densetsu. Su- 
mitomo Cement Tata Enginooing and 
Locomotive. ^ Ttedmec, Tokyo Printing Ink, 
Tok), Itoe Industries. 

Europte 

e Nov. 7 Brunets EU finance mlnte- 
tare' monthly m ee ti n g. 

London September manufacturing out- 
put industrial production and consumer 
credit. 

r a nduge Mteectetf Associated British 
Poode. , 

‘ . ✓ 




Frankfurt September final M-3 and retail 
sates and October adtusted cost ol living. 
Parte September M-3. 

• Nov. 8 Amsterd a m September PPl 
and January-July trade balance. 

B ras s si s EU industry ntinstera meet 
Frankfurt October unemployment. 
Zurich October unemployment. 
Earnings e xp e cte d Anglian Water, Brit- 
ish Airways, uam & Spencer. Man- 
chener ROckveratoherunge-Geaetfschatt 
S.Q, Warburg Group. 

• Mow. B Copenhagen September In- 
dustrial oedsis and sales. 

London August visible trade. 

Madrid National holiday. Major financial 
markets dosed. 


Parte August current account 
Earnings aepectad crtrie & Wireless. 
Commercial Union. Novo NordWc. SAS. 
eMon.10 Amstentera September re- 
tail sales. 

Oslo October CPI. 

Frankf urt Bundesbank central coutcU 
mealing. 

Parts October preliminary CM. 
Stockholm October CPI. 

Earnings expected British Telecom, 
Royal Insurance Hokflngs, Scottish Pow- 
er. Shan Transport & T ratting, Veba. 
eNew.11 fimoliert— i September In- 
dustrial sales. 

Paris Armistice Day hoDday- Financial 

marked dosed. 

Rom Bank of Italy employees* sight- 
hour softs. 

Madrid Bmria woriuxs* one-day strike. 
|M g* —i—.sw 1 Aegon, UrMever. 

A m fl c— ‘ 

• Nov. 7 Washington September con- 
sumer cradtt. 

Mexico Cl te August industrial produo- 
lion. 

Caracas Opening day of rights Offering 
at maty Eto c Wti rt a d de Cwaces. 

See Paulo Automobile and fight-track 
production. 

Earnings ra itete d ArwTayior Stores, 
Canadten Pacific. Geico, M/A-Com. May 
Department Suras, MFS Communica- 
tions. Paxar. Qualcomm, Ralston Purina, 
Rteston-Continantai Baking Group, 
e Bn. B Washington Congressional 
otoet to ns . September wholesale trade. 
Ottawa Monthly housing starts report 

a MB*. 9 W ash ington Third-quarter 

productivity- 

Ottawa September new-vohide sales 
snd housing price totta. 

Mexico aty October Inflation. Average 
Interbank Interest rate, 
a Hew. 10 WasUngfam October pro- 
ducer price Index and money supfriy. 
Weakly money supply report. Initial vmefc- 
ly state unen«itoyitient co m pen sa tion In- 
surance dakre. 

SaoPauta XHlay inflation. 
eHoK.ii OS. VMeran'eDsgr holiday. 
Financial markea open; banks and feder- 
al offices dosed. 


Euromarts 
At a Glance 


Eurobond Yields 

rrov.40a.3S Yrwm Yrkw 
U5.S. loo* ttm U6 &a L4& 6J1 

Oil nten term 7J1 729 7J1 145 

US-Lsherttra 731 723 733 4SS 

PatSKllflerBM 9J2 9JD Ml 636 

Freaca tones Ul LU U4 1S7 

notion a* n.M tt.u njo 7ji 

Ocaba krona KM U& IU4 US 

SwHfisa kraaa JOTS 10M 1L23 7JU 

ECU. too term U3 IB LSI LU 

ECaradni term U Ur LSD SJ1 

CHLS 937 9.17 9M 333 

ASLI n.17 HLB7 1B.T7 339 

HZ.* 9J3 9J0B M Iff 

TIB Ul U2 IK 211 

Soares: Uncembaurs Stock Exchange. 

Weekly Seles n ».3 

pi lirjrv Market 

Ccdri Esredear 

S Haas S Hess 

StrateBtS T3DJB 10520 NUB SUM 

Convert. - ojs nsn - 

F$m% «30 76433 HS 1U2* 

ECP 1S9MB Z4S7J0 ?J572D W7X 

TUU LT3L90 1777J0 1USL4D 4JQB90 

Swenterv Merkel 

CwW Eoradaar 

I NaeS s Nans 

Strotobts tllSLOB tS21S.lt 33549JB 3USZS9 

Convert. tt?JD Z2M 1SKU9 UJ1JQ 

FENS L85BB1 l.ttUO 2&SU50 5.73? 58 

ECP 7,t8SU 11Z7UB tfiZHLTB 8297.10 

Total tVfUV fW7M J9J3U0 

Seam: Ewodear, CedfL 


Lent Week’s Markets 


Alt figures am os of close of trodtna ‘ 

Stock Indexee 


Money Rates 


SB. pin 

S & P 500 
5& P Ind 
NYSECP 


DAX 

Hone Kong 


Nov. 4 

Ocf .28 ora* 

UnOcd States 

Nov. 4 

aao7A 

293066 — 213% 

Discount rote 

400 

T7B.16 

18U5 —152% 

Prime rate 

7% 

1497X8 

153677 —253% 

Federal funds rote 

4M> 

43936 

4393B — 228% 

■t— n 


55X45 

25421 

47177 —243% 
36154 —151% 
259X3 —241% 

Discount 

COO money 

3-monte interbank 

1% 

119 

25716 

3j09Z60 

340350 4-0X5% 

Cennanv 


2373JJ0 

2345.10 + 1.19% 

Lombard 

6JOO 



Coll money 

455 

TAS1L5A 

mns.it +050% 

3-montti interbank 
Beam 

536 

2067.56 

204232 +134% 

Bank base rata 

5% 



CofI money 

Sttt 

VAO40 

9379X7 +1X1 % 

3-monte Interbunk 

61/16 



OeM Nov. 4 

Oct. 26 

63429 

633JD +006% 

London pjTLflxS 3SU0 

387 JO 


mrU index From Mamt Stanley Casual an 


Libor Rates 


Nov. 4 


l-monts 

Mnreft 

frmoelk 

USlI 

51/16 

M 

JWtt 

OnlldCBBl 

4% 

sins 

53/M 

Rmdltaritag 

sn/tt 

6 

67/16 

FriMCblrtoc 

sw 

5% 

511/M 

ECU 

59/16 

515/16 

61/M 

Ton 

23/M 

at 

M 

Sources: IMs Book. Roofers. 



International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

Monday 

International Conferences and Semtoars 
Tuesday 

Education Directory 
Wednesday . 

Business Message Center 

Thursday 

Internationa! Recruitment 
Friday 


BANK FOR SALE 

Caribbean based, firtl license, 
fisted Banker's Almanac 
offered on a no assets / no 
fiabifities basis torS2 m. 
Principals only , please, 
phone or fax (+353) 1-493 2B32 


I Saturday 
Arte and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tet (33-1) 46 3734 74 - Fax (33-1) 46 3752 12 




ribimc 


BEUING (Bloomberg) — If New Yoric stock listings of two 
Chinese airlines prove successful, Beijing will allow o^r domes- 
tic airlines to sen shares overseas, the official China Daily Busi- 
ness Weekly reported. , 

China Southern Airlines Group and China Eastern Airways 
were selected by the Chinese government in January to be the first 
airlines to sell shares to foreign investors. The two companies are 
expected to sell shares in New York within the next few months. 

Ambrosiano Shareholders Fight Bid 

MILAN (Bloombe^) -—A group of core shareholders that 
controls 68 percent of Banco Ambrosiano Veneto SpA has decid- 
ed to increase its stake to block the takeover attempt by Banca 
Commerdale Italians. 

Three of the five large shareholders said they had agreed to 
extend a pact to block toe 1.75 trillion lira (51 1 billion) takeover 
bid. The three are Credit Agricole, of France, Banca San Paolo di 
Brescia SpA, of Italy, and Crediop. As part of toe agreement. 
Credit Agricole and Crediop will buy out the shares held by a 
fourth member, a group of cooperative hanVs in toe northeast 
region of toe Veneto, where Ambrosiano is based. 

They will pay 7,000 lire a share, toe same as Banca Commerdale 
is offering, for a total of 470 billion lire. The purchase will raise 
each of their stakes in Ambrosiano to just over 21 percent from 15 
percent. San Paolo di Brescia will remain at 12.7 percent. 

Publisher Vows to Fight Takeover 

AUCKLAND, New Zealand (AFP) — Wilson & Horton Ltd- 
one of the oldest and most conservative publishers in New 
Zealand, vowed Sunday to resist an attempted takeover by Brier- 
ley Investments Ltd. 

After a buying spree last week, Brier ley now controls 26 percent 
of Wilson & Horton, which publishes the New Zealand Herald. 
Brierley has said it planned to increase its stake to nearly 30 
percent by toe close of trading on Monday. 

Discount Stores Aid Coles Myer Sales 

SYDNEY (AFP) — Coles Myer Ltd said Sunday that its sales 
junmed 7.7 percenC to 3.89 billion Australian dollars ($2.9 billion) 
in toe first quarter of its financial year. 

The retailer said strong performance at its Kmart and Target 
discount department stores contributed to the largest quarterly 
sales gain since November 1990. 

British Firms Back Single Currency 

BIRMINGHAM, England (Reuters) — British business lead- 
ers gave massive backing on Sunday for an eventual European 
single currency. 

A Confederation of British Industry survey of 212 top British 
companies showed 84 percent believed a single currency for 
Europe would be good for business and only 8 percent felt it 
would be damaging. 




This week’s topics: 

o Clinton Plans An Asian Summit 
o Asians Plan For Clinton 
o Work and Play On The Internet 
o Novo Nordisk, Biotech Pioneer 
o Putting The Byte Into Nixdorf 

Wow available at your newsstand! 

BusinessWeek International 
14, av d'Oudby, CH-1806 Laosanae Tel. 41-21-517-4411 
For subscriptions call UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2939 


ASSET AND LIABILITY MANAGEMENT 

Nov. 14 - 18 

INSEA D 

TREASURY MANAGEMENT 

Nov. 14 - 18, Dec. 12 - 16 

COURSE CONTENT 

Tta courses, given in one week modules, combine the latest academic 
Oinking coupled with practical cases based on raal-worid situations. 

Al sessions and materials are in English. 

MfttfiMATlON AND REGISTRATION 

For further Monnaiion and our detafled brochure, please contact 

his. KateEjn Epptek, Corase Manager. 

The Amsterdam ftutiaae 0/ Finance offers top-level aaiaing counts throughout the year 
jar bankers and professionals In OiefleUs of corporate finance and capital markets. 


THE HINDUJA GROUP 

is pleased to announce the launch of 



AMAS BANK (SWITZERLAND) LTD. 

A new dimension in private b anking tradition 

• Offer conservative and liquid multi-currency 
portfolio management 

• Provide competitive and personal Swiss private 
banking services 

0 Introduce investment opportunities via structured, 
targeted direct and portfolio investments in India 
and other emerging markets 

• Benefit from strong relationships with financial 
institutions, investment banks and correspondent 
banks 

• Enter into strategic alliances and collaborations 

The Hmduja Group 1 !! global network draws on a century 
of local business presence in countries today 
recognised as emerging markets 

AMAS Bank (Switzerland) Ltd. 

14 Quai du Seujet, 1211 Geneva 1 
TeL 022/732 1130 Fax. 022/738 5997 


i “ra iw w in ran m rat smm» mn 




Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY* NOVEMBER 7, 1994 



It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane . . . It’s a Supersonic! 


Speed is tempting, but both the cost of developing a successor to Concorde and the future environmental effects of fleets of such planes are worrying. 


In their campaign to re- 
launch supersonic travel, air- 
craft manufacturers are 
tempting governments and 
travelers with promises of 
super-fast travel times: Eu- 
rope to Tokyo in five hours 
or Los Angeles in just over 
six. 

The much-discussed new 
generation of supersonic 
planes, bigger and possibly 
faster than the existing An- 
glo-French Concorde, is 
back on the drawing boards 
on both sides of the Atlantic. 
The Japanese are interested, 
and the Russians are back in 
the game in collaboration 
with the Americans. 

The Concorde was a ma- 
jor technical achievement, 
but it never returned the 
money spent on it. Sixteen 
are flying between London 
and Paris and New York, 
and British Airways has 
asked the plane's manufac- 
turers - Aerospatiale and 
British Aerospace - to ex- 
tend the fleet's lifetime. 

Critics say that the droop- 


nosed plane is an expensive 
luxury used only by wealthy 
corporate travelers and 
celebrities. Would-be manu- 
facturers, who are working 
with Deutsche Airbus, 
counter with the argument 
that a new, larger supersonic 
would be more economical 
and have greater range. 

Delta-wing aircraft, if they 
are ever built, will cost a for- 
tune and would not enter 
service for another 10 years 
or more, but lobbyists are 
stressing their desirability 
and inevitability. 

Hie United States, which 
missed out on the first gen- 
eration of supersonic pas- 
senger planes, is determined 
to be in on the act this time. 


vestment follows the $500 
million that NASA has al- 
ready spent on supersonic 
research. 

Beating the drum, NASA 
stated recently: “Shortly af- 
ter the turn of the century, a 
fleet of American- made su- 
personic airliners may be 
carrying thousands of pas- 
sengers per year at more 
than twice the speed of 
sound - Mach 2.4- to points 
around the globe.” 

NASA and the U.S. indus- 
try are working together to 
make this a reality. 

Why a new plane? Says 
NASA: “The emergence of 
Pacific Rim countries as 
world financial powers 
makes the idea of a next- 


Douglas to develop airframe 
technologies for aerodynam- 
ics, flight systems, materials 
and structures. The coopera- 
tion between the rival plane 
makers is a precedent 


NASA beats the drum 
NASA, never one to shrink 
from megabiUion-dollar pro- 
jects, will be putting up $1.5 
billion over the next five 
years to fund research by 
Boeing and McDonnell 
Douglas and the big U.S. en- 
gine makers. The new in- 


generation supersonic trans- 
port especially attractive.” 


port especially attractive. 

For the aircraft industry, 
the thought of a market 
worth $200 billion or more 
in 2015 that could create 
140,000 jobs is mouthwater- 
ing. NASA has awarded a 
$440 million contract to 
Boeing and McDonnell 


Ozone layer at risk 
Another $266 million is go- 
ing to GE Aircraft Engines 
and United Technologies’ 
Pratt & Whitney division to 
work on advanced propul- 
sion components - ultra-low 
nitrogen-oxide combustors, 
low-noise exhaust nozzles 
and other environmentally 
friendly technologies for a 
plane referred to in the busi- 
ness as the U.S. HSCT 
(High-Speed Civil Trans- 
port). 

Honeywell will receive 
$75 million to develop flight 
decks. In another move to 
accelerate the program, 
which began in 1990, 
NASA has signed with Rus- 
sia's Tupolev Design Bu- 
reau to use die TU 144 su- 
personic as a flying test bed. 
NASA personnel will begin 


flying with Russians on the 
Tupolev next year. 

The danger to the ozone 
layer of a fleet of superson- 
ics cruising the stratosphere 
has led NASA to recruit an 
international group of “at- 
mospheric science experts.” 
Aerospatiale's president, 
Louis Gallois, warned at a 
recent supersonic air travel 
symposium in Toulouse. 
France’s aerospace capital, 
that Europe risked becom- 
ing a subcontractor to the 
Americans unless it acted 
quickly. 

The British, French and 
Germans launched a Euro- 
pean Supersonic Research 
Program this spring and are 
looking at a 250-seat plane 
(the Concorde seats 100) 
flying at Mach 2.05, with a 
range of up to 1 1,000 kilo- 
meters, twice that of the 
Concorde. 

Mr. Gallois estimates that 
15 years from now, passen- 
ger traffic will be four times 
the level it had reached 
when the Concorde was 


launched. He called for a 
SI 00 million annual re- 
search effort in Europe to 
match that of the Americans. 
Eventual collaboration could 
then be on an equal footing. 

At the moment, Europe is 
spending only $15 million a 
year on supersonic research, 
half of it contributed by the 
French. This is but a quarter 
of the sum allocated by the 
Japanese, who are closely 
linked with Boeing 

Experts at the Toulouse 
symposium spoke grandly 
of the need for 500 to 1,000 
new supersonics by 2025 to 
meet long-haul needs. The 
problem is that such a fleet 
might well rip through the 
ozone layer. 

A more down-to-earth 
problem is cosL How will 
cash-strapped airlines find 
the S250 million, twice the 
price of a 747, far a new su- 
personic? The supersonic 
lobby says that tickets 
should cost only 20 percent 
more than present subsonic 
rates. 










h vy. 






• I 


Amsterdam 

.! : j ft.Oc 

Berlin 













W*« WIIH »Mfr r«V*\ >VI flf»- 


‘-I 


Bratislava 

arr. 13. -15 


asw-s-.- 


Bruxelles 



People 


r 


going places 


get more out 


of iht. 


Ydu tell os you enjoy the 30 minutes you spend engrossed in your paper, 
ft appears you don't miss a single page.t 

You also tefi us tfiar last year alone you flew on an astonishing 4.76 million 
p||;|^nKSS air trips and r^tted4.56 million cars.* 


It yotiand the leading travel companies who advertise 


us are ffestinial ip jneet in the pages of the International Herald Tribune. 

from which these facts are taken, please call, 
p on : (33 T l) : 46 37 93 81; in Asia, Andrew Thomas on 

[1^5) 223 Aijqncas, Richard Lynch on <212) 752 3890: 




: *' Reader . 


i Vnhnft 
brterartfoiwl 

Airport 


/t-l $ ff, I 

i—j J i/il L‘ k J aj 


- * ‘! w . h ■IjJ'V .■ , mV. . • , ■ ’ . m\ : .r.1. . ■ 

'■ r : '/ ■: \ ;■ v 





^ Vs 


r“ *L ^ 

l' \ 


r; 


i ter 






















SPONSORED SFC TTav 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 13 


SPONSORED SECTION 


a! 


For frequent flyers, better seats are top priority 

c 

V^orporate traveler Mart nmfi» n u:i:i a l*: 



V'Oiporate traveler Mark 
Taylor of Britain is the kind 
of frequent flier . the world’s 
airlines, big and small, are 
seeking to lure back into 
their front-of-the-plane busi- 
ness classes. He downgrad- 
ed to economy class during 
the recession, but penned 
these thoughts to an airline 
magazin e: 

• \Theie must be many oth- 
ers who. like myself, are 
quite 'happy with economy 
service, but would pay a bit 
-more, for a comfortable seat 
to stretch out in,” he wrote. 

Airlines have listened to 
the Mark Taylors among 
their customers and are 
speeding a small fortune on 
the installation of better 
seats. These are wider, often 
with adjustable head rests, 
back supports, greater angle 
of recline, more legroom 
and, occasionally, footrests. 
In some cases, there are pop- 
out videos and connections 
for personal computers and 
fltx machines. 

Industry developments 
Global traffic is running 
higher, with IATA predict- 
ing a 6.4 percent increase in 
passengers carried and the 
24-member Association of 
European Airlines announc- 
ing an 8.5 percent increase 
in traffic in the first half of 
1994. Traffic inside Europe 
was up by 9.1 percent, and 
between Europe and the 
Middle East by 9.8 percent 
New airports at Denver, 
Osaka, Munich. Warsaw 
and other cities have been 
built for the rising traffic. 
Chicago, Manila, Amster- 
dam. Frankfurt and Rome 
are among those being ex- 
tended. Charles de Gaulle in 
. Paris has linked with the 
TGV express train. 

The op ening this month of 
a new Austrian Airlines ser- 
vice to Krakow is further 
proof ofgrowing business 


and tourist traffic to Eastern to wipe out the heavy losses 
Europe. Austrian Airlines, a of the past four years. 


pioneer of east-bound flights 
in Cold War days, has 
reaped the benefit of its in- 
vestment and is now carry- 
ing half a million passengers 
a year to some 17 destina- 
tions in Central and Eastern 
Europe, including Russia, 
the CIS and the Baltic states. 

Airiines, meanwhile, con- 
tinue their long quest for 


More value for money 
New seats, starting with die 
airline's 767s and 757s, are 
the priority of British Air- 
ways’ £70 million ($108 
million) reorganization of its 
Club Europe business-class 
sendee. 

Swissair’s new seats are 
generally considered the 



' I ' . “Air Travel.” 

« Us entirety by the Advertisii* Department of 

- - . the httermtioaal Herald Tribune, 
i ; - 4/off TiUier. Paris-based atilhur if 

. = - “Cmde itt Business Travel Europe. 

. . : ■> f/yi rpMxmAM MMCIUK Bill Mllbder. 


A V E L 


profitability. Alliances have 
been struck, the most no- 
table example being the link 
between United, Lufthansa 
and Thai to create a so- 
called seamless world ser- 
vice. British Airways has 
chosen a different path, tak- 
ing equity stakes in USAir, 
Qantas and a string of small 
European carriers. Air mile 
schemes have become more 
generous. 

Smaller planes preferred- 
Jumbo jets are yielding 
ground to aircraft of the 250- 
300 seat variety, such as 
Boeing’s existing 767 and 
the upcoming 777. From late 
1995, new ‘Triple 7s” trill 
be able to carry some 310 
passengers up to 7,000 miles 
nonstop. The plane, built 
with the aid of Dassault's 
engineering software and 
Japanese heavy industty, is 
Boeing's answer to airline 
demands for a wide-bodied 
jet smaller than the 747 that 
could compete with McDon- 
nell Douglas’s MD1 1 (a de- 
rivative of the DC 10) and 
the Airbus 340. 

Regional carriers have in- 
vested in 100-seaters for in- 
tercity markets. The Franco- 
Italian ATR is the most suc- 
cessful. Smaller Swedish 
Saab 340 turbo props have 
been selling well. American 
Eagle, the Dallas-based 
feeder to American Airlines, 
now has 1 16. Some regional 
lines in Europe were ahead 
of their big brothers in intro- 
ducing greater seat comfort 
The trend, says Ian Ver- 
ch&re. author of the authori- 
tative “The Air Transport In- 
dustry in Crisis,” is toward 
‘lower capacity aircraft and 
greater frequency .” 

Major U.S. airlines - 
American, Delta, United and 
Northwest - have been mak- 
ing money recently, as have 
their Asian counterparts, but 
hot enough, by any means, | 



ft - ■ 


4111! 

l ' ' -- 


**v *"•« 


f'.r' 

■ • 








V. 







7he newly opened fine that Bnks Charles deGatdle airport, Paris, wffli the TGV express tmfn that wiB cany a traveler efeewriere In Europe. 


.... 


best, along with those of 
KLM in its World Business 
Class. Like many other air- 
lines, KLM has dropped its 
first-class section and says 
its new business service has 
attracted 30 percent more 
corporate travelers. 

Lufthansa, implementing 
the findings of a poll in 
which 80 percent of business 
travelers said they wanted 
more leg and elbow room, 
now has better seats, and its 
ground engineers can quick- 
ly change the configuration, 
yanking out a seat to create 
extra space. It is perhaps no 
coincidence that the airline 
is now showing a profit for 
the first time since 1989. 

The aim of airlines in 
1994 can be summed up as 
“More value for the same 
money." But discounts and 
consolidator fares can some- 
times mean that business 


travelers spend less. They 
are also being wooed by 
telephones, parking lot 
check-in, more and better 
lounges, and pick-up ser- 
vices. Sear comfort, howev- 
er, is all-important. 

Mixed messages on fares 
The results are there. “De- 
spite some recent indications 
to the contrary, business- 
class travel is on the in- 
crease,” says John Chaplin, 
rice president for market de- 
velopment at Visa Interna- 
tional, commenting on a sur- 
vey of 2,000 frequent busi- 
ness travelers. 

“Some 27 percent claimed 
that, over the past year, they 
had made more trips than in 
the previous 12 months, 
compared to 19 percent 
making less. 

Although the price of an 
airline ticket may not be the 


Jet Lag 


Jet lag can be a drag. 

It’s afternoon in Tokyo. The business meeting is going weiL 
Yet something feels wrong. Your body is awake, but your 
mind seems asleep somewhere in London. Welcome to 
the world of jet lag. 

The Hotel Okura understands that adjusting to new time 
zones is often half the global business battle. So we’ve 
created a special Jet Lag Fighting Plan that helps you 
adapt as quickly as possible 

The only such plan in Japan, its amenities cover the three 
main avenues of attack for overcoming the effects of jet lag: 

Exercise: Use of the Okura Health Club for stretching, 
swimming, sauna, jet stream bath and body sonic systems. 

Relaxation: A light therapy box that simulates soothing 
natural daylight relaxation videos, and the special sleep 
pillows you prefer automatically fu rnished to your room 
every time you visit— a Hotel Okura 
exclusive service. 

Special Okura jet-lag fighting 
nutrition menu. 

Naturally, all this takes place in an ' 
atmosphere of comfort and luxury 
that makes the Hotel Okura the 
best business address you can have 
when you're travelling in Japan. 

Find out for yourself. 


The Legend in the Heart of Tokyo 


o 'UXlCAXi, M 

2- 10-4 Toranomcn, Mmato-ku. Tokyo 105. Japan ‘jjgggfe 

Td: (3)3582-01 1 1: Fax: (3)3582-3707 ^ 

M-.T_g .IA 

For a brochure regarding the Hotel Okura Jet Lag Fighting 
Plan, contact us by mail or facsimile, indude your name, 
address, company and title, telephone, facsimile number, and 
the name ol the publication in which you saw this ad. 

I London Office Tel: <0m)353-®K; Fax: ©ml 353-0877 ■AnNpMnOBn 
Ter toaasranSO: Fax: (02*6788866 IWew Yak Office Tel: taa7te0733; 
Fa* : (212688-4627 Rios Angeles Office Tel: (800I32&228I. (20)48&-W77: 
Fax: (213)488-3382 I Hong Kong Office Td: 8te-m7; Fax:896-1909 


determining factor for Euro- 
pean business travelers in 
choosing a class of travel, 
Mr. Chaplin believes that the 
extra charged for “deluxe" 
service should be nearer the 
25-50 percent mark-up in 
the hotel industry, and not 
the double or quadruple 
rates that airlines have offi- 
cially quoted for business- 
class travel. 

James Foster, of the Lon- 
don travel agency First Call 
Business Travel, says that, 
while published fares are be- 
ing maintained or even 
raised slightly, the reality is 
that the business traveler can 
obtain reductions of up to 60 
percent by looking for dis- 
counts. consolidator fares 
and other forms of discount- 
ing unsold seats. 

“The trade is now selling 
seats at reduced rates, just 
like the old bucket shops. 


while the airlines are openly 
discounting," says Mr. Fos- 
ter. “We rarely sell a full 
fare to Boston, for example, 
and you can buy a business- 
class return ticket to Aus- 
tralia for £1,500, as against 
the official £3,600.” 

Business Traveler maga- 
zine stated recently: “A 
combination of market 
forces and currency fluctua- 
tions has distorted European 
airfares to the extent that ex- 
ecutives who buy wisely can 
sample business-class ser- 
vice for less than the econo- 
my fare. Better stiU, they can 
book a round-trip ticket for 
less than the one-way fare.” 

On the ground, hotels are 
fine-tuning prices and busi- 
ness services for the air trav- 
eler. although, like the air- 
lines. they are anxious about 
yields. The new Hilton at 
Charles de Gaulle airport. 


Paris, with its 20 high-tech 
conference rooms and culi- 
nary delights, such as a luxu- 
rious oyster bar, is set to 
challenge airport hotels in 
London and Frankfurt. 

Prince Al-Waleed Bin Ta- 
lal Bin Abdulaziz A1 Saud, 
of Saudi Arabia, now part- 
owner of the luxury Four 
Seasons chain, is consolidat- 
ing the business charm of 
grand London hotels, such 
as the Regent and the Four 
Seasons. The latter has con- 


verted its famous conserva- 
tory suites into bedroom-of- 
fices. and airline assistance 
is now on a par with advice 
on London tailoring. 

Tokyo’s Okura Hotel has 
an ingenious “jet-lag-fight- 
ing plan" for short-stay 
guests. Dr. Misuo Sasaki, an 
expert in the matter, super- 
vises stretching, a jet-stream 
bath and body sonic system 
followed by relaxation with 
a personalized pillow and 
bright light therapy. 


■ s V/,!-. 


UK* ■ 

•• m % t •* a .|.A ■■■ 


- '1990. 1980 im m 1993 

• gating tewenues ' T44.5 193.2 186.2 200.6 217.4 

expanses 140.2 192.4 187.0 2012 2147 

i^jercShgfosult 43 03 -0.8 -0.6 2.7 

Source: IfitA Mctrk&t ancf fccrarafc /Vxtfysfs Division 
















ENTERNATIONAL HERAtD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


Consolidated trading for week swt 

ended Friday. Nov. 4. awksi 

Athene 

Amey 

AMdran 

Aflonfod 

^ ABAm 

_ AttQau 

Stacks a» YW JDOJWflh Low CSlOw akmait 

' AflGuK. 

I — m AnsaAa- 

A I AflTaM 

- Atmets 

Aped Pod > 2260 3% 3 3% -W AMoSIt 

_ S4M 15% 13ft 15% *1 AfrOd. 


APea Pod „ 22U» 3 3% -% "™ps 

ARw _ 5420 15% 13ft 15% +1 ATrtXL 

AAON - 2077 1W. 13ft MW - AvBb" 

ABcaa .19* i a 9013% 13% ijw — % Aunosy 

_ 101372% lift 21ft —Vi toe; 

_ IW 16 15W U + % Autoterf 
jo u 7i3i4Vi T3ft u> -ft A utcam s 
1673 It IS 1 * IS 1 * — ft Autodw 


Otv YM 100a HMi Low Qsc O 

- 700 17% UH 1 7% 4-1 

_ 1440 7'A 6ft 6ft - 

J7t 4J 114 Blk 8V, BW - 

_ 410 10% 1QV* 10ft t 

34 2.1 2 16ft IMA 16W * 

_ 1222 2 lft lft - 

> M7 3ft 3% 3V, _ 

> 339 3% 3 3 - 

- 1069 10th 9ft 10'* — 

SB 1.923402 10 16', 4 16%— 1 

_ 1387109, 046 9% — 1 

>3070737% 34% 34ft— 3 

_ 343025% 23 34 — 1 

- 1638 Oft 5% 616 + 

m 874520 IB 18V.— 1 

_ 32274 SVh 4« M - 

- 9613 B 6% 7’Vfe — 

- 3133 3 346 2*6, *■ 

_ 1723 T2ft 11% 12 - 

J4 26 1023 9% 0% 94k + 


Kv YW IOOiHWi Low Om Oise f Stack, Ov YU UMHoh Low dso d*t I Stacks 


.120 7 2085 17 15% 16% Ml 04 .8 1572134% 31% 3116— 2 


- 2578 9% BW 8% —1 AutoGP 
_ 1B11 38% 34% 37W +2 % AuMmu 

- 3618 47V, 43 43ft -3ft Aflolnfl 

- 416 14% 13% 13% 4% AUOlOfe 

- 5033 21 17% I7%— 2 AvStaC 

37 9% 8% 8% — % AuWTCh 

jfl J 3617% 17 17% *% Avndle _ 

- 7252 6'A 5 S — 1 AHeM .02 

_ 486811% 10% 11 —'4 

AESCD5 J8t W 3S5B20V6 19% 19% — % I 

_ 159616% 14% 15 -% I— 

_ 1040033% 31% 31%— 1 
_ 5499 33% 31% 31% -ft fBaT 1.16 

J4 3.4 149 25% 74 25 4% BCBFlfl J* 

APS Hid _ 23J7J9W 28% 29% «•% BEActo 

ARIMet - 156 3% 3% 3% _ BEI 0 M 

AST -3398213% 12ft 12% -ft BFEnt 

ATS 6%d _ 1022 4% 3% 3% -ft BFSNY 

AW Ah — 65 1 % Ife — BGS A0 

Acmes JO Uxl432 9 8% B% — ft BHA .W 

Wime .10 J 57612% 12% 12% -ft SHCFnd J8 

AoronHl M J 11 12V. 11% 12% -% Bl hx 

AostfieT - J£I IS 5 5&XL- 

AhnnL M 2042 5Vi 4% 5 ■#. BKCSfljn 

AbbnrH -14326 23% 21 22 -% BMCSH 

AbirwSB M XI 310 14% 12% 13 —1 BAflCWtl 
Attend — 911 7ft 6 6 —ft BMJ 

AtfeTel > 2353 7ft 6"ft 7% 4% BNH 

AMms .12 2J 168 5% 4ft 5ft -ft BP' P*8 m 

aSwS - 415 11% 10% 11 4% BSBBcS M 

aSh - 217 2% 2% 2 V* 4 V, BT Fin 1.121 

ACKH3 - 191119% 17ft 18ft 4ft BTShp 

AcdaBn -2727317% 16% 16% — % BTU Irt 

AcaiSWt - 879 14 13ft 13ft —V. BUM Inf 

AceCsh _ 535 8% 7» 7% —U BW1P M 

Acsto J3 2J 16814% 14 14 - BcdXXK 

ACMTA _ 2101 9Vi 8% 9 4% BstaySsfr 

AareMHt _ 2Q48$S% IBWIBWa-IV* goO'!^ 

Add - 3966 9 B'A Bft * V. BackBav 

AcfPert — 1625 5ft 5 5% + % g^ar-P 

AdPrnr _ 1746 1 Vi, ft 1 ♦% Bwley 

AOVolc - 1649 22% 27 22ft _ BfcHs Wt 

Aaiiam - 1939 30 28 »% -ft ftftsrj M 

AdccLb M U 1310 81. Bft Bft “ft BafchfTl 5 

Mao - 1«0 6ft 5ft 5% 4% BM_yB5 J4| 

Atolcs -45097 34% 22% 23Vi, Bak^« 

Adinain - 468011 10% 10ft — 1 ft BatyGm 

AtfcShh - 24512% 12 12 _ BaBvsCr 


_ 2763 10ft 8% 9 - 

- 2598 5% JV4 5% — 

- 305826% 24 25% 41 

_ 698919ft 16% 17%“1 
.. 8935% 34% 35% * 

- 770438ft 36ft 37% — 

- 7143 8 6% 7% t 

.020 A 133 4% 4% 4% + 


Me 1A 14237% 36% 
JS XI 165 9 
CapTrra J2a US in 17% 16ft 

£3£ I £S”SS r 

S&o 

COTMmz 
Cenwsif 
Caroline 
Crccwdc 

CortOn 


Sdcs . 

Dhr YW lOOsKdh Low ase cm Stacks 



V. BackBw 
% gadorP 
► ft Bailey 


478 36ft 35ft 35% —ft BaBck 


1.16 X9 4306 30 29% 29% 41 

Mr J !013Vu 13Vu 13Vu *> 
_ 2309 B% 8 8% 

M 1A 4136 5% 5 5 — J 

8 3% 3% 3% -1 

- 1U34%22%24B%— 1* 

JO 3J 16 23 22ft 23 * 

.12 7.0 51513ft 12% 1214 

JOS S m 9% 8% 9 — 

- 1BZ1 5% 4% 4% — 
_ 2657 27ft 21% 21ft — 

- 10 4 3 3ft 4 

-26786 48% 44% 46 4 

_ 2848 17% 16ft 17ft 4 

- 174 12 lift 12 

892 1% 1 1% 

-. 3994 4ft 4% 4ft 
J8 3J 223 27% 36% 27ft 4! 
1.12 b 4. a 3(9629 27% Z7% — 1 

- 803 3 2% 2% 

- 1948 4% 4% *% 4' 

737 Ttl 7 7Yu +S 
M XI 5105 19% 17ft 18% 4| 
_ 148613% 13ft 13ft 

- 3881 45% 42 42ft — V 

- 4934 3% 3 3% — I 

- 80 9ft Bft 8% — ' 
8311ft 10% lift 

- 2234 7% 6ft 7ft «■’ 
-10254 Vn ftj 1ft* 

M A 6739 17% 16ft 16ft — > 

- 131 6% SM 5ft — 1 

J4al.6 249615% 14% 16 *’ 

1314 13% 13% — 11 

- 5731 12% 10ft lift *1 
_ 26311% lift lift 

- 5 7% 7% 7% 


AtfvHW 
AdvRoss 
AdwClr 
Advuaa 
AfUlka. 

AdNMR _ 5651 3 2% 3 *ft Bc^OU 

AdvPofy - 1874 5 4ft rVp—*f r B CgWJ 

AdwPrO _ 703 6 5ft 5% —ft BancfcC 

Artrtem _ 1660 4% 3% 4 * ft BanitoM 

AOvTUb 511716ft 15ft 16ft, — '<u Bondao 

Art/Tch _ 236 6ft 6ft 6% ♦ % BkSoum 

AdvTiSS _ 8317 7% 7% 7% * ft BUG* an 

Advanta J7 IX 7565 39ft 26ft 26% —3% BnkNH 

AdvtmtB J2 1J 6257 26% 25 25 —1ft BankAfl 

AdvBcp - 505 29 38 38% — % Bnklitd 


1 55885% si 


AdobeSy JO A34061 37ft 33% 34ft— 1 BonPonc IJ0 3J 2222 30ft 30% 3M% 

Adtran - 3797 36ft 34V, 35% •% BanPn^2-W 9.0 14534% g% 11 

1300 31% 28 30 * 1ft BcOnepfCXSO 6-5 649 54ft 53% 53% —4 

1 1039 34 21% O *lft BncFslOK 24 lj 3 14% 14% 14% —1 

I 2MII1 lOft TOft -ft BctStOHS J8 3A 32 24ft M «%-! 

870 4% 4 r '. 4ft - % BancVtS — 45 4ft 4% 4% * 1 

Z 167 6% 6% 6% ~% BncGcAC 32r 1 J -f 

5651 3 2V. 3 - ft BepSou 1 JO X7 303 32% 31ft 32% + 1 

I 1074 5 4ft 4Tfe_lv" BSNJ JO 3-5 BJSEft 31 32% *T. 

- 7B3 6 5% 5% — ft BanctaC ££,*[*• 'Jft 21ft +4 

_ 1660 4ft 3% 4 *ft BandoM .Ms 7.0 x230 14ft 13 11% . 

511716ft 15ft 16ft, —'ll, Bondopf 1£*U 2 22£ 22% 22ft— 1 

236 6V, 6ft 6% *% BkSoufti -52 3.1 8610 17% 16ft 17 —4 

I B317 7% 7ft 7% • ft BX Grans JO 1 J 83 27% 26 26ft —4 


JO XI 19 25ft 24 24 —I 

J5 1 J 984 15 14% 15 — \ 

.10 1.6 123 tft 6% 6% — V 


Z 3154 5ft 4ft 4ft -ft Bankrs* JO 2J 217014% 14ft 14ft — J 


Aomjm 

AorlUyn 

AirE«. J4 

AlrMeftt 

AlrScn wt 

AlrSen 

AirSvs 


- 299 Bft Bft 8ft —ft BnkFst 

- 88512% 13% 12% —ft Btallh 

- 1935 27ft 21 21ft -ft Banta 

_ 1593 17% 16ft 1 6ft —V, BanvSU 

_ 263 Bft 7»V 7 V m — Vi. BanyfJT 

J 40B6 13 12ft 12V,— ‘4ft BanynSv 
_ 1706 11% ID 10ft —ft Barefls 

- 96 1% 1% 1% — ft Barra 

J 7040 28% 27ft 29ft -ft BarotB, 

_ 1123 2ft 2ft 2ft —ft BarcfRs 

- 368 3ft 1%9«C -'ft BsTnBrl 

- 63011 10 10ft BsTnA 

_ 303 6% 5V, 5% _ BasPirs 


.60 3J 18819% IS 18% — '■ 
JO 7.6 866 23% 22% 23 

J2 I J 6616 34 30ft 37% *9 

_ 340 1% 1% 1% 

JO PJ 450 4>.« 4% 4% 

8531 18 17% 17% —A 

.13 J 5385 14% 13ft 14% -6 

1233 7ft 6ft 7% *V 

- 799 15 12% 14Vh ♦ Wi 

_ 3224 21ft 19% 21 *1V 

1977 2ft 1% 10% *V| 

_ 1773 8'.r 7% 7ft *4 

- 1S6 11% lift lift, -ft 

2473 12ft 12% 12ft 


GarePtr 

Caw 

CanierFS 

CaxCom 

Cased* 


2466 9ft 8ft 9ft, —ft, 

WO 4% 3% 4 4ft 
602 18ft 17 

5781 1246 12 12ft 441 m 

sm m 5% sft —ft 
- 2883 26% 23ft 23ft 
,91 e 3J 38029%, 28ft 23V> —ft 

JOb 1J 440 15% 14% 14% — % | DU4 Fn 

SBhIs 1 

-12575 60% 54ft 59 43ft 
JO 16 8525 23ft 23ft 


Parr 

Parrel 

FoPCrn 

Fastanol JM .1 

Fdamrtre 

FdScrw JOdXO 
FgCar 

- 11125 8ft Bft Bft — % t 
- 18033 9ft 6 6 -3ft RdenCh 


FamBc JO U 351 19% 18Vi 18ft -ft 
FamBOfA .95 103 5665 9% 9 9% -ft 

FornStk - 209 tft. jr„ 

Farmflr 200 I J 6127 127 127 —3 

Fa’inMch - 184014% 13 14% -1 

■- — 138 6ft Sft 5ft 

4 7ft 7ft 7ft 

1905 4% 3ft 3ft —ft 

8656 46 Oft 44ft -ft 

2250 7ft 7% 7ft 

1320 16ft 20 

J7e 1.3X3102 Oft 71 2I%— 1ft 
Z731 5ft *n% 5ft 

BB 6% 5ft 5ft —ft 

424 10% 10ft 10ft —ft 


SMK ' 

Dhr YW IQBsKMl Low Q».Ok 


683 Bft 8 Bft, —ft, 
JO J 2002 25 23ft 24ft " 
122 15% 14fti 15 
17911ft lift lift 
361 2ft 2 
2 9 9 

412 4% 4% 4% 

972 27 25ft 25% —ft 
JOB 5ft 5ft 5ft —ft, 
117 7 6ft 6ft —ft 
n XI 12929ft 28ft 29% 4 % 

1363 8% 7ft 8ft 
525416% 15ft 16 — % 

IS Aft A* 


Ofv YU WOSHW* LOW on owe 



IBM iy*n— ■%, OfTHme -1B03S 9H 6 6 “3% FkSnCh - 424 ia% lOft 10ft — % wnna il JI™ 

2ft 2ft — % DBA • I lsfisS 5 Sft J8 1J 3915% IS 15 1 .’. -% HarWFd J4« XO >5017% W 17 

TVu Tfti —ft, DEPA lSS 3ft Ift - SSmVA .12 1.1 5312 lift lift - 'A | HnjBAS „ 1% 

54ft & 43% DGPB Z 1134 3% 3% Z fidFdlSv M 10 612 14% 13% 13ft*-»ft, 1 HOrtW 

aft ay. - DF&R Z immk, 4-iS RdemiY _ 278 3ft 28 a _ Hrtvrns Mata _ft}29% » aft 


9 -08 J 2061 13% 12% 13ft — ftfDHTch 


3603 9% 8% 8% 

1093 2 1% 1% 

641811% 10% 1) 

,1408 3ft 22% 22% 

33293 6% 5% 6ft +%, 

BCTlift, |% ]Jft, -Vi, DSBnc 

87415% 14ft 16% —ft DSC* 

3083 3ft 2*ft» 3% -ft OSGint 

_ 2484 4% 3% 3% —ft DSP Bp 
JO 4J 48414 12 13 -ft DSP 

- 1972 8% 8 8% t'A DTlnds 

.14 1 J 2204 9% 9% 9ft +% DUSA 

73696 7ft 7% " 

7401 % ft 


7401 % ft ft, 

86 5% 5% 5% 

1389 17ft 16% 17% 

87920% 18ft 18 
1634 4ft 6ft M 

3368 8 7% 7ft _ 

374917 16ft 16ft —ft Danskln 

665 4 3ft 4 tft DorVna 

5363 17% 16% 16% — U DarTGa 

_ . - 1624 53ft 52ft 53ft —ft Dffitfcst 

CeninHs _ 2300 45% 44ft 45V, +ft DtalO 

CeKmPR _ 236736% 35ft 36 *Vt Dnnim 

QetaTC* -1345016% 13 16ft + 3ft OtaRsh 

Cettrx -174H 6ft Z% 2% —3ft DtSwtch 

Gong* JO 1J x423 18ft 17ft 17ft +ft DoloSyst 

CenJlOa* J6 1J 13430ft 27ft 27ft— 2% DtaTm 
CtaltBc 1J7M4J 7310% 10 10% t Vi DtTrNw 

CmCW _ 23B2I7M 16% 16% ' 

Qrflnk .16 1J 6712ft 11% 11% 


- 134828ft 27% 28ft xft FktatalY 

SS"*' 

ajsioj^na* a* Aft**i\& KoSe* 
“f>«& — 27S S 4ft 4% —Hi 

DRHOTt J4t 5J 46213% 12% 13ft +ft 
_ 624 »ft 24ft 25 —1ft 
-6061932% 29% 29% — 1% HndflcP 
J501J 83726ft 25ft 25% - FnBonA 

- 6921 26 27% 24% +Vi RldBUS 

. - 227 Oft 3ft 3ft +ft Fincfioc 

gjjnds J4e J 16190 13 12ft 12ft — % RnTrS S 

- 2626-4% 4 4ft t life RnancSd 

- 132117% 15% 17 +1 FtaSdwi 

- 31 16% 18 16ft rift RnLuje 

- 30 3ft 2% 2% _ HibMsT 

- 8317 3% 2% 3ft 4% Hr, Her* 


... 23311ft 9% lift _ HortySOV ^ XI *>ggS 23% aft*7ft 
1J4 X4 31B7S2V. 51ftS1W),— '<u Harmon .4 9332 22% 17% 17%-4% 

3676 S% 4% 4% -% HqrpCp JO 1J 7»51»b Uft 13 *lft 

2177 8 7% 7*. — Vu HontHa - 

MS 9 7ft Bft - HflffijC S - ”**}?* ?jS IS? 

683036 24% 25% *fi HorWw J7e 1 J ,g 15 “£*£**£ 

2405 7% 7Vi* 7% — % Hg yFBr 

- 1172 9ft Bft 9 — ft Harvbid 

181 7J 483 IWu 2ft 2ft I Hcakd 
uq. Mil in, —at wnw 


9513 12W. 1P6 

_ 178 18V, 16% 16% 

FlnTnJs .92 tl 152»ftffl »« 


199 9% Bft 8ft — % 
1019 17% 17 1 * 17% —ft 
2067 10ft 9 10ft 
J2e6J 97 3% gj 3ft 
— — , HauaOl — i 777 AMi SH 6 * Vb 

£ hSSS _ 1971 14 !» *yk 


Centrbfcl 
Centarm 
Csmooorl 
Center wf 
OrCQp I 
CEurMda 


303913% lift 1 
15094 21 18ft 1 
33781 18% 15% 1 
536014ft 9% 10 
926 16 13% 14 


ChMkwyl 
■■ iDaftnor 

♦ Jft DatscDl 
lift Dtmifl ■ 
lft Dd g w m 
lift DtawtchH 


581516% 15% 16ft t% Ddoffee 


1.12 19 2107 29ft mV, Wft— 1 

CenGartta - 1980 4ft 4 41 

CfrHNBC J1 1J 68M 27 27 

C%fc 33 22 TttSZ 1 *, 32% 32 
OerPln . JObXO ir 20tt +1 

OrMlse jfl 2 A 77 30 Vi 19% 19% 
«su» J4 M lffl 6% 7ft 8% 

QlSpm 
QrtTroc 


RnancSet _ M4 3ft 3ft --- . jb 2.1 1*0214 12 T3ft *1' 

aSa 6 % t% -T3 toStJa .a is 

205310% 9% IB ft ‘fttaffl 

j=Wter s J6 J 274 32% 31% 32ft -ft iHewkC 

Z 263015% 15” 15% +%S FAtaon J0D2L8 x41 7% 7ft 7V, 1 HaatfFn 

asm 3ft 3%-JV» FstAWts „U3802I%W 19 — !H WKSv 
T7B 7ft 7VV pvATn 1J0 3J 572830ft 79ft 29ft— 1% I HtWllnC 

" Jff.-W AH T y* SftLc 3 M SSft 21ft 21ft -JHHW5V* 

~«6K21% 19% 21% +% PfcpOH 1J0 4J law* 23ft 23ft — % HWlPw r 

3011% 3H 3ft —ft i SSlrt 2J5 BJ BIM’A ZSftZSWc— WhRsk 

Z 266812 % 10 % 11 %,-Wu FstOjshS .10* J »Jfc Wj. ” w I 

J a 86 83% 85 +1 FWCsh - £13 3ft 3% 3% - »«g»* 

-SSS T 5% HA ROST JS 5J «»■ 1^ 

= «6% «5 6% »ft F§£a |3 ? UB 

“ 1039 2% 3ft 2ft —ft FG^W JO 33 ldTOHft 22 TI'U —ft I 

= i f 7a Ixh !S it «SS5 Ji 

- 9718% T7ft 1BW — ft FOndTpf 1JI 60 10631%* » — ■ HrtWin* 

_ 2292 9% 8% 8% -% FOriBCP - H IS. ±'? iJS “ft 

nn iVi 3 We 4. «/*. erv npTB 3 J7 14 Wl Z1 ^ 2DV* aWi —Vi HoiBD 

Z 45B 16«r 15!A iSkS +£ FTEsex J2 4.T TTO SVk 7% TV* } JgjgS- 

- 725618% 16% 17% — 1 FFEowO - *** rC fig?" 

no k, ,u mil- it ctprnD 52b34 Z57 17 IrA 15ft — 1, . rtena 

- jS? —S SCrtK. S o 432 30 30 —ft 1 HeiJemi J2e2J 400 9% 8% 9% *1 

“ IB Nli 1ft “ft nrSUl £ 19 509131 19% 19%-1% HebBlTr " 

Z 5& -S *, 5S8T5U 1W. 15ft 

_ 14310ft 9ft 10U +ft 


J2 16 36820% 20 » 

14b 1 J 445 7ft 6% 7ft 

210 7% 4 4ft —ft 
1233 12% 11% 12% +% 
5081 19 17% 16 

1646 28% 27% 27% 
33613 12 12% 

999 Bft 6% 7% 

1184 4% 4ft 4% r ft 
3207 2ft 1% 2ft *H 
115 % % % —ft 

265 1 1 I 

3737629% 25% 28% -t-lft 
3677 8% 7ft B*u — 
US 10% 10% 10% — % 
304436 31% Kft— 3% 

608424% 23 23ft +% 
361 30 » 29% +1% 

951 14% 13% 13Vu — lft, 
J04 J 27511% W% lift -ft 
.16 U 71092 lift ISft lift - 
51 7ft 6% 7ft +H 
. :ncac> - 2912 Uft 14% 15% -ft 

■ft ! Heidemi J2e2J 9% Bft 9ft -I 
4011 19ft 17% 18% —Tit 
245 4ft SV, 6V, 



JB 11 25B 15% 15ft 15ft - Hrtton u _ « n- _ 

J0 41 44 15ft 14ft 14ft -ft HefccTea M 2J 3540 32ft 39ft 30ft —ft 
m 17 624% 24% 24% _ Hemosure _ 1069 3% 2% 3 — % 


14310ft 9ft 10ft —ft I FFSLOH JO 4.1 44 IS 1 * 14ft 14ft ft j HefixTCS 

Z TOO 8% 8% lft *2 “ HP Si?? a H22SH" 


Daurdw 1 JO 4J 5026 MY, Tzv,rSuZ 31 FFSvFD JOB J 39610% 10 W% -ft Hnryjci JO X2 109T 9% B% 9% +% 
«1?5S lSv -ISSSlHslJB XB 121 39ft 37ft 38 -ft ! HertjHe J8 M1MI73fft 15ft 17% *1 I 


Dovco 

Dawet 

DavdtnA 

□awn 


- .. ..T, - FFncOHslJB XB 121 3V'y 37Y| 38 

_ 100814ft 13% 14ft -ft RFnBfcS 1.12 3.9 3129* 

-11994 28ft 21ft 26ft +4ft RFrtCrS 366 12 1 1ft 12 


*r lift so io% +% DawTch 

OTirac _ 2200 14% 1S% 16% —ft Dawson 

OtSau .03e A 155 7 6% 7 +% DavRun 

QWVBC .10 1J 140 7ft 6% 7ft +% 1 

aryS c js X9 54 12ft 11% 12ft +1 

CepNn - 2318 9% 6- 8ft —1ft 

CUrdyn ^ 333 m 2ft 2ft — % uecKOUT 

Cerbco _ 21 3% 3% 3% +% DewToch _ 

earner - 663042% 39% 41ft -ft Oeerta* Mo 1 J 

Orplex _ 177614 11% 13 +Tft Defnlnc 

Cnymcar J3e 1.6 40WMft *5% 26% -ft DeflcShd 


_ 431 4% 4% 4% .. FtFnCc 
_ 11947 5% 4ft 5ft -ft FslFnlN 
_ 19112 lift 11% _ «-«"« 


; .; „ M 2J 2505 14% 13% Mft — % 

PstPnlN SS 17 8032% 31 31 —1 | HfTcPhr 
FPnWMS JO 17 284 25V. 7T* 23ft— lft Htaerfv 


iHerttoFd J8 1J X8 21% 21% 21% 

ft Hert0F5 J6 2J 149 18 17ft 18 


ChoiNaTa 

Chakno 

SSSfr’ - 20 

ajampps 
Chmln 


179 3M 3% 

104 4% 6 
92 25ft 24% 

399 4% 4 
648 6% 5 
70 5% 4% 4% 




St3t 


_ 3633 1B lift 16% — % FBFnHW J6 3J x2g T6 T5 15% 

~ 1981 31 28% 29ft +1% FJFtTTk JO 1J 3829ft MY. Mft— 1.. ' Htehw da 

— 455 SV, 5 5 —ft FtGaHd s _ 15 5% 5% 5% — % i Hfide 

JO 47 610 5 4% 4ft —ft FHCTBc JO \ A g Wt gft »%— lft HjtWOjS 

_ 77015ft 14ft 14% —ft FTHOW 1.18 4J TBE 27ft 26ft 27-A _ I Knstfe 

— 337 10% Oft Oft —ft Fsttndis -53 3-5 198 15V, 15 15 — % i hOnch 

M ifB OSL ™ 72 2J 16813ft 13 13ft— % HOax 

_ 175312% 11% I? *% HnLoPsSc 
1.12 X6 41932% 31% 31% -ft Hoemg 

J8b 23 249 24 23ft 23ft — % Honan 

48 24 6827 26% 26% —ft HWyRV 


w=? 

15 

11% 

II 

5 % -% 

4294 

16 

a 9* 
»% — % 
73 +* 

IBM, — » 

13ft *.ft 

ra% +% 

i% +% 
9ft — % 
24 —ft 
6 % - 
17ft 
1 
4 ft 
6% 

10% 

SSft 
31% - 

» - . 
6% 

12ft 

5*. 

2% - 
10% — 

IB — % 
1«% —ft 
14% -ft 
TO, -ft, 
7% ♦% 

15% — % 

"5 -*• 

12% r% 
22 ft ~ 
4 —ft 
9% —ft 
17ft —ft 

*£ +*B 


Div Y« lQOlltiW Law OsoOne 


IS WS^K 


JOalJ 436% 33% 33% _ FTLbty 

_ 1711 7% 7 7 —ft FMerAcc 

— 781 9% Bft 8% — % RMere 

_ 57516ft 15% 15ft —ft FlMrfl S 

JO u 3030ft 29ft 29% —ft FMkfflC 


-10b 1 J 61 10ft 10% 10% 


Ak-Jde 
Aldla* 

AlcxBJd 
AiexEna 
ABaCo 
AKosR 
Afiao 

Alkenn _ . , .. . . 

AUASem „ 4673 2V U 2 zv u — v E BctiCabi 

wiAIIFOJr _ 1814 ft ft ft -'fu BellAWc 

Anatv _ 10 10'i 10ft 10ft ♦ ft BeBSpt 

AteoW _ 6*0 10% 10% 10ft _ BetweTs 

AUeoicn „ 15 BW 7\. T 1 ! BenJemr 

AtaOro 52 b 1 J 49 36ft 36 36''. -ft BFrankR 

ABanPn „ *70 8 6ft 7ft —ft Bonbon 

AlnSemi „ 10603 27 24ft 26% —ft BansonF 

AIBkCao JOB 7 «I29 29% 28 28% -1% BentOG 

AJldBic s J3 2.3 262 14ft 13ft 13ft —ft BeHdBy 

AldCaaC 1.32 7.9 153516ft 16ft 16% - BorKGs 

AOdCao U5e 9.8 575 13ft 13% 13ft - % Bertud 
AldCall lJ2eSJ 615 IS 14% 14>i„ — ’/ u BesiPwr 

AldCan 1.00 73 354 13% 13ft 13%, -'ft BesIPd 

AffiedGd <59 27 2079 29ft 27% 27ft— lft Besloo 

AldHIPd JB 1J 964 17>'. 16 17 + '/« Bony Be 

AndHIdt, _ 3038 13ft 12% 13 —ft Be«lS 

AtaLHe .16 1J m 16ft 14 15V, -ft Bi o B 

AWWVO 3204 5 V, 4% 5% -ft BiBQTIr 

AllstFn ^ 366 6% 6ft 6V, - ft B^jRck 

AHirista - 499 70 19 ft 20 -ft Buitfv 


Airtran .12 1.710144 7% 6 7% BasExri, -■ 2473 12% 12% 12% - 

Akom _ 2490 3ft T/u 3"/u ♦4'» BasseliF JO 10 1258 Z7ft 26ft T3 — V, 

Akia 174e X9X2619 63 59% 59ft— lft BalToch _ SQSTVh 2ft Tht — V 

ModnKn _ 5B2 9% 9 9% * % BayNfws 118835 28% 244%, M% -IV 

AlnmoGp J6 U 54 16 15 16 _ BavRidae 3M7 Uft 13% 13% — V 

AkirdK — 10064 18% 16% 16 - 191 BayVw JO 2J 667 g Zlft Zl%— I 

1 JO 67 22 18% 18 18 —ft BavBla 1 JO 3.1 3127 ffl% »% M 

JO IJ TWO 22ft 21ft 21% —ft Bavport - 499 4ft 3ft 3ft — V 

„ 99 8 7ft 8 - ft Beaucn J2 2J 653 15>.i I4V, 14ft - V 


ChrmSh j 09 U 20301 7ft 7% 7Yu —ft, Detatnf 

ChrlFdS J»« 7 1124 lift 10% 11 *•% DeMira 

ClrtOnF % 68 X5 3673 20ft 19% 19% —ft DallPiiW 

157 6% 6% 6% —ft DeRNG 

324 Sft 5ft 5ft 

34928 4% 3% 4 • ~ , 

408 Sft 7% 8 _ Dsontm 

1662 19% 18ft 19 — % I DBJans 


M Z5 33418 17ft 17ft -ft FMWA 

>64341 45ft 41ft 41ft— lft FNtGo . 

_ Z15 20 19ft 19% _ FNDda * JO 2J 

_ 1273 lft 1% lft — % FNinSB *» *• 

_ 179214ft 14ft 14ft — % FfOtft S 
.16 J 17616ft 16% Mft _ FIPCNIW 


FtMdwF JSe J 11616 If* 15ft -ft HlywdCO 


991 3ft 3ft — *n* 

453 6V. 6ft 6ft „ 

3817 16 16 _ 

3236 9% Bft 7ft +%, 

44 11 10ft 10% — % 

32 23 Mi 22% 23% — % 

« 9ft Bft 9ft -ft | 7~^ 1 

ISM 1% 2% -W I 1 1 

.10Q2J M5 4V. 3ft 3ft —ft LA T Stl, _ 209 6% 6ft 6ft +ft 

.17 e 2J 1074 6% 6ft 6% —ft LCI Hi >1567025% 23% 24ft -rft 

326 2 1% lft -ft LCUntpt 1JS 37x2816 34% 32% 34U -lft 

3912 6% 6 6 _ UCS .10 IJ 142 7% 7 7ft ♦% 

5340 32% 29% 29ft— 2ft LDDS* >61333 24% 22ft 22ft +% 


- % 1 hOwdPV. > 4118131%, 11% lift— lft LDICp .11 U 35 5% 5>A 

■4! RKSppf 70 6.1 19613% 11% 11%— 2 LFSBg, 70 IJ 144 15ft 15% 

VmHotooic > 236216ft Mft ISft — % USBNCs J4 2.1 3520% 18% 


JO IJ 7900 22% 21% 21% — % Bavport 

„ 99 8 7ft 8 -ft BeauOl 

> 2842 13 12% 12ft - BedBctti 

J8 19x1372024 22 22%— lft BedfrdBC 

3173 6 5% 5'»« — v„ Beebas 

J6 37 19611ft 10% lift ♦% BelFuse 

> 5620 25% 74% Sft -ft BekBIk 

.150 .9 75 17ft 17 17 — ft Belize 


J7 2X5 659 15ft MV, 14% - V 

-,26497 30ft 26% 27V,— IK 

_ 2011 10% 10% — ¥ 

>1083 4 3ft 3% -V 

- 643 8% 7ft 8% *¥ 

> 227 14% ISft 14ft - 

JOe 1.6 28618% 17ft 18% -V 


_ 1472 3ft 2% 7% — % BeflBcps Jfl 1.2 *76526% 24 24ft— 1* 


Atohal 

AlatiaBla - 

Alotrarl 

a&S z 

Audi 

Alteon 

AH era _5 

AHResc 

Allmn 

Amber _ 

AmbrStr 

Amcor ,99e 37 
AmcorFs JO 3J 

SSSS? : 

Amrians .60 18 


Z alifS f% 


> 4191 74 23V« 24 -41 

-16092 13ft 11% lift— 1 
>13906 21% 17V, 17ft — 3 ’4 

498 6 5% 6 -V, 

> 1775 13ft 12 13 -W 

_ 561 4ft 4ft 4ft — H 

_ 299 6% 5% 6ft - M 

_ 4SI 12 lift 12 *W 

_. 9124 8ft 7ft Bft - M 

J4 17 1846 36ft 25 26 — V. 

1.10 7.1 W 15% 15ft 15% 

_ 191514% 13 13% —ft 

5930 ISV. 13ft 14% + 16 

8946 7% 6<Vm 6<Vm — v, 
_ 136 10% Oft 9ft 

J! 15 5 21 21 21 —1 

-. 983 4 3 % 3% — ft* 

.16 IJ 2084 13 12 12ft -ft 

> 1634 17ft 16 16 —ft 

> 660 lift lO’AH'lfa - IVe 
J fl J 119013% 12% 13% -ft 


3684 4% 3% 3% —1 DotSyf 
33 12% 12ft 12 %— lft DeintC 
63d] 38 3B% — % DevBOn 

469 4ft 3ft 4ft +% DeVBul 
59614 14 14 —1% Devon 

295 17 15ft 15ft— 1% 

— 5157 24% 22ft 84% -ft 
OiestVS J2b 1.7 14820V, 19ft 19ft— 1ft 
OlDock JD4 A 66311% 10ft 11% -% 

Olios. S _ 5663 8% 6% 7ft —'ft, 

Chktono > 809 3 2V, 2ft — Vu 

ChfldCfe _ 135BM lift lift— 3 

Oiinorek > 435 1% 1’/., lft, —4 

giipcom >17511 65% » 63ft -3% 

OliPS Tc > 16402 6ft 5% 5% +%. 

OOron >56016 67% S8% 99 —6% 

QWtend -52 X5 X153 21 ft Mft 20% —ft 

ChcDro > 25035 5ft 3% 4% > DiQttSv 

CheCrwt _ 1692 lft 1 lVu +%, DimeFn 

Oioiest _ 1072 3% 2% 2% -% Dtanex 

Owen _ > 20621ft Mft 21ft -ft DbcZOrw 

Oi mends J71 XI 14240 1 5% 12ft 15 -2%, Dixie Yr 
_ 195610ft 8ft 10% -2 Doib-Gnl 
13109 32V, 28 30 -ft “ 


_ 194 4% 4% Ml —Vu 

>24503 9% r*, Bft -lft 

_ ZU 9ft 8ft Bft — % FlShenoa 78 1.9 6615 14ft 14% -ft 

- 29 12ft 12ft 12ft _ IstSrc J4 IJ X22 25’J, 24%24^ u 

> 100 8% 7ft 7ft — % FfSousst 75 I J 1113 M% 13% 13ft —ft 

> 672 1ft lft lft -ft FISOBCP J2 1.9 370 27% 26% 27 —ft 


- 570 25 24% 32 


job 1.9 a lift io% loft 

79 47 171120 18ft 19 — , 

FNOcta* JO Z5 17 33% 32% Mft — ft iHlwdPpr 70 XI 

S3 3.9 30314 13ft 13%. -V«|HotoBic - 

75 IJ 33620% 19% 20% — % Hetoftne > 281 1M 17ft 17ft— *9* LSIJnd 

87*8 7ft 6ft 6ft —ft | HetnB - 69 6ft 6 6ft -ft LTX 

111617V. 16ft 16%— 1ft ' HomBen JO 3J 28421 Mft 21 +% LVMHs 

... - 3425ft 25 25 > LXE _ 

_ 935 6 5ft 6 -ft LoJnHPh 

nStfMre JSelJ 133 18’A 17% 17% —ft ‘ HRJSvF 33b 13 *16 14ft 14ft —ft LoJoIPwt 

FSeoCp 1.04 47 511026% 24ft 25 — IftlHmFFU* -35 X5308S710ft 9ft ItHft. -ft UoOoie 

RShensa 73 1.9 66 15 14% 14% -ft HmPrT JDa A6 63813% 12% 13 -ft LabOOd 

IstSrc J4 IJ X22 25 1 i 24%34^u HmeSKO > 23414% 13% 17ft -ft LodcdcSt 

PCaiad _M IX 1113 UK ITU Uk. Ik I MrvThn _ 5m 6ft SOfn SVn -ft LaddFr 

8413 12 13% —ft LadvLudc 


D^Sy 'jOSe^f S7U31% 3W 30ft —ft FTPrtSn .131 XI 'Z22 7 ~ SH 6ft Zft j HmFedIN JO IJ 2425% 25 25 
DepGty 1.12 37 121929ft 2Bft Mft— 1 FISBkNJ J5b2J 42B%27%27% _ | HFMO __ 9IS 6 W I 


_ 1055 22% 20ft 21ft —ft FlSFin 
_ 9967 19% 1B% 18ft -ft FTTnom 


■ ft | FSlSfBcp JJBe .6 287 14 13ft 14 


JO 2J 575 8 7% 8 

_ 263216% 15 1 5ft 


> 1267 6ft 5% 5ft -ft FstTenn 1J8 4.1 11093 47% 46ft 46Y„— r%. ! HomcTB* 


97536% 34% 34%— lft 
TO 14J 1838 lft lft lft —ft 
791 12ft 12 12 —ft 


> 1345 4% 4Vh 6% -% FTUtdBCp -87 e 1.1 1521 6% 6% 6% 

JO X9 1733 22% 20ft 20ft— 1% Fftffd 76 ZJ 1 33 33 33 

_ 53 9% Bft 9ft —ft FHJWC S J8 27 12 18% 16 

>201717 16 16 — % FsrWcm J5* 7 440 37 

> 25020% 27 20%—% F1WBC 1JM 37 409 28% Z7ft2Bft 

> 1001 Bft 7% 7ft —V, FfFOdBn JOe 7.7 56 19% 18% 18% —V, HaSOOS 

_ 6934 23ft 71ft 22 -VS FTFdFns J8 27 120 22 21 21ft ! w.*fc«r 

> 518815ft 14% is _ FTNttMG .. 607 9ft 9ft V. 

>12729 3% 2% 2ft —ft Fsttklll 170 XI 101 M% » 38% . . . ... 

> 7288 11 Sft 10% -1 FstrckBc 

> 495 9% 9 9ft _ Fischim 

_ 86037ft 37 37% -ft Faerv 

> 5126 20% 18ft 20% -lft FknFn 6 JO 12 

JO 19 2258 7% 6ft 7 —ft Roaster _ ... 


lift -ft LokewF J5 1.7 135116 


.16 X9 35 5ft 5% 5% —ft 
JO I J 164 15ft 15ft 13ft -. 
J4 XI 35 20% 18% Mft -2 
,16b IJ X44911Y1 11 11 —ft 

_ 4599 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

Air 17 13733% 31 31% —% 

_ 24513ft 13 13ft -ft 

> 3646 2Vu 1% 1% —ft* 

_ 898 % Vu -Vi. 

> 160 13% 1» 13 —% 

72 4J 39017ft 16% 16% —ft 

> 84312ft 10ft lift —% 

.12 17 4278 6% 6 6ft — ft 

_ 4450 Sft 2Vu 3%» —ft 

_ 489 6% STt 5% —ft, 

J0a3J x35 Zlft 20 20 —lft 

> MP 3% 3ft 3ft _ 


A 17 125 27% 26% 26V*— >Vu LamRwSi 


>2515146% 43 43%— 3% 


_ , HorzBcp UB 3J 7931 2S 28 — 1 I LxBKStrs J8 IJ 6821* 33ft 34H, -ft. 

ft | kk .jf gl, IJh 7 7 Ml 19ft r? 12 — ft I Lanee 76 XS 409218 17ft 17%. — Vu 


ft I HorzTtBk J2b 27 Ml 12ft 12 ._ E 

Hambk _ 10579 15% 14% rdjv -u LanoJ 

Henna ,n»X2 204 Sft 5 5 > Londoir 

Hasoas - 13 8 _7ft .7% > LdmkBc 


_ 125816% 15% 16% -% 
_ 31121ft Mft 20ft — % 
I _ 34 9 8% 8% -ft 


Fstbklll 1 JO XI 101 a% 38 a% 

5221 25 22% 23% 


HudCBct 73 5J 
% I HuflCOO 

5231 2S 22% 23% —ft I HuaotEn 
960 5 4ft 4% -ft ' HamGen 
537523ft 21% 21%— 1% Humbtrd 
7 9ft 9% 9% — % I HunUB 
1480 8ft 8 8% - % 1 Hunted 


HudsnCB JO 3J 17619 17% 18%, — ft, UMldBnc JOe SJ X289 11% 11 


— " 7413ft 13ft 13ft > LdmkGph 

107 fl 7% B +% Landry* 

943 12 10ft 13 -lft Lnndsir 

378 ISft 17ft 17% _ unmet 

294 15ft 14% 15 —ft UXXXtflc 

JO 1.3x3653 17ft 15ft 1 5ft W. LaserPr 

.10 J 1037 23ft Zlft 23 — 1% LasmiTc 



rirfm 

OMALb 

Gmao 


TO 719037 30 Mft 28W,,— <¥» Rastr p( 2J5 11J 1093 20% 19% 20 - ft ! KurnBn S JO 4J 10829 18 17ft 17% —ft 


2384 9% 8% 8% -% Doneacri 


1.10 57 918% II 18% +% Flair 

J6 2J 16513ft 12ft 12% _ Ftamst 

> 7405 21 17% 18ft— 7% Ftexstl 


anorFIm _ TO WVm 4*%. «%• +>%i DTCtlHu J8 5J 33013% 12ft 13ft — % Rextm 

armFkl 1JB 2J5 209151 49ft 50% -ft DorseyTr _ 29715ft 14% 13ft -lft 

QnMIC „ 708 6ft 5% 5% —ft DcScd > 107 8% Bft B% -% 


Onerai 

Cintas 

□prtcol 

CrcFnl 

Grdnc 

CirCDnl 

ClrcSv 

Cirrus I 

IGSCdsI 

OtFeaH 

GlatnCnt 

atotfonM 

GtiBncI 

arkmtrl 




301 7 6ft 6% —ft 
.17 J 2191 Mft a 35% 

25 4% 4% 4ft 
25 25 24% 24% —ft 

.90a 8.6 40010% 10% 10% 

58512ft 12ft 12ft — % I DrecuE 
799 5ft Sft 5% -ft DresB 
35898 29% 27ft 27ft— 1% Drewln 


230*58 32% 29ft 31ft -1% DrexV 

J 476 29ft 27ft 29 -IV, DrvyerG 

> 1250 7i* 6ft 7ft —ft DiubE 

81511% 11 11% —ft, Dryners 

4517ft 16% 17ft -ft DualDfl 

2319 23% 22% 23% —Vo Duckwafl 

590 Mft 27% 27%—l DuraPh 

Dmui.rd 


> 1182 1% lft lft —ft 

... > 4226 21 20ft 21 -ft 

Dots Lom 40 M 416 17% 16% 16% - ft 
Dovatm _ Wl 27% 26% 27 — % 

Dnjxtso -10e _ 2133 IVu lft Wo *Vu 

> 979 9% 8% 9% -ft 

> 4604 10ft 9ft 10ft -ft 

t > 101 Bft 8% 8% _ 


□ranis o 
% I DrecuE 


- 3149 6% 5% 6% +1 Foresro 
74 17 530 25% 25V. 25 ft —ft FbrOOpf 

_ 573 4ft 4ft 4%, +V» FOTSCh 

- 252713% 13 12% -ft Fbrxtm 


> 600 13% 12ft 12% —ft RWYne S J8 13 387 28 


•12e 7 3057 18ft lT’.fc 17% 

.12 3J> xlB 4 \<e 4'r» Ktp — Ya • HutCtlT 

J8 4J 320 ISft 10% 10% —ft HyMPhr 

3974 Mft 12% 13% -ft Hrcor 

42 5ft 5ft 5% _ i HvdeAtti 

1263 6% Aft Aft —ft i HvtfeAIB 

641 7 6% 6% —ft HydrTch 

7853 9% 8% 9ft — % 

1685 6% 6ft 6ft -ft 

JO? 1 J 7185 6 5% 5% _ 

rn U 38561 5ft 5% 

JOb <L0 373 S’. 7% 8 —ft , I -ST AT 

55% 48% 55 -2% . I BAH 

1.08 X3 234 33ft 32ft 32ft —ft . IBSFnci 
... MISS'S 3 1 ', 3ft — Vv.ICOlnc 
75 5.9 25712ft 12 12ft - V, ‘ KD Pf 
3*4511% 10% 10% -Ai I ICDS 
_ 445 6% 6 


258 4% 3% 4% -ft LalACas 
1858524% 22 Mft— TV. Lattice 


_ 554821ft 19 19ft —ft 
_ 523930% Mft 29ft —ft 
_ 2446 33ft 30ft 31ft— 1% 
>1539812% 9% 121* -3% 

> 144 7ft 6% 7 —ft 
>15849 TO*, 6% 7% rift 

> 7126 16ft 15% 15% —ft 

> 2552 4% 4% 4% -ft 

_ 77 1% 1% 1% —ft 

>1168518% 16% 17% -% 


590 Mft 27% 77%— 1 
28 35% 34 35% »2 

ill* J4 37 199 76% 26 26 

322 5 4 4% -ft , ^ _ 

389 5% Sft 5% *V H Dur Irons 42 2Jxll 

245 9 8 8% — % DwyerGp 

3503 6% 6ft 6ft _ 

3161 I'M lft 1% —ft 

5625 11ft lift 11% 

18 Sft 3% 3% 

23313ft 12% 12% -ft 

Pf X31 8J 527ft 27V. 27ft *1% , 

30709 15% 8ft lift— 4% Etor M _ 

290 4-A 3% 4% _ EiBWlnr 

6419ft 9% 9% — ft EA Eng s _ I 

saaft*^ 

Pf X25 9J 19724 73% 22% -ft 

> 14492 34ft 29% 33% +3 
S .56 2.3 48 28 25% 26 —2 


k =51 


_ 1566 1% 1% lft -i/ B BtoSocci 

306 4V. 3% 4ft —ft BtoSurf 

> 1644 lft lw, I 'I’d -‘ft BmPtiar 

> 20 3ft Jft Sft —ft Biacir 

_. torn 7 6ft &ft _ BiacxYSt 


rWaSftSS^H 

464421% 19ft 19ft— lft 

.. 168918 17ft I7ft _ 



aiKU w !S% :s 


1J0 7A 197 22% 21% 21% — « 

AmFPr 1.06 1X7 ID 7ft 7ft 7V. _ 

J4 9.2 592 6 Sft Sft - ft 

__ .75 10J IW 8 TV. 7ft - ft 

AnwrOn Jl e _ 16775 74ft 66 73 -4ft 

AmSvce > 46 6 Sft 6 


AmStfce 
AmBcnu JO 
ABrtir 
AmBtoon 
AmBldg 
AmBusi 
Amaiv 
ACknm 
AaasVoy .16 
ACdloid 74 


46 6 Mrm u > 

XO 12*17 15% 16% -ft 

3J 3284 21% 19V, 21 -lft' 

1491 2«.. 7Vu 2V* —V. 

_ 7418 19ft Mft IB"u —Vo 

> 103418 17 17 -1 ' 


kisser.*, 
ss? ljmt 


AFIIWTI 
AmFro 
AGreet 
AM17KP 
AmHoW 
AHamPot 
AHorratr 


> 1004 IB 17 17 —1 BIckD 

8 16 16 16 —ft Blytti 

_ 123 2% 7ft 2ft —ft BoafBnc 

.16 .9 1549 17% 16% 17% - % BabEvn 

74 1 j 2233 16ft 15% 16ft. '‘ft, BocaRs 

> 78 2Yu 2% 2ft. -V. Bdfinoer 
_ 95*3 Mft Mft 25ft —2ft BanTon 

■08e IJ 748 8% 7% 7% -% BoakMs 

_ 216 2ft 1ft 2ft > BooteB 

> 20310% 9% 9% -ft Baaimwn 

78 X4 265917 '1% 11% -% Bortnd 


78 2J 2659 17 '1% 11% -% Bortnd 

1 JO 37 X352 77 26 27 -1 Barrur 

_ 3907 21% 20% 20% —ft Boat Ac 
-56 XI 2*151 27ft 26ft 76ft —ft Best Be 
_ 5443 7ft Aft 7ft -ft BostCTlS 
> 351 1V» n-a w a _ BostTc 

AHomPOt _ 895 22 21 73 -I BoxEn B 

AHorratr > 1355 10ft 9% 9% —1 BovdBras 

AlndF 74 2J 1(49311% 10ft 10% — % BrodPbm 
AmlnRwt .. M20 Vp V., +V B BrdP wtA 

AmlntP, _ 3604 1’%, life 1»,, — ¥ n BrdPwtB 

ArrOeot 116 \07 162 31% 20% 21ft > BrCP-rtO 

AmLck _ 16 5 5 9 _ Brody M 

AMS 5 _ 6703 16ft 15ft 15ft — % Brontre 

AJViedE _ 3013 6% 6ft 6ft -ft BmfdSi/s 


Jfl J ^ ** 

Z 1U519% 16% 16% —3ft 
1327 Sft 3% 3ft —ft 
... 4021 HV m 19i, lft —V. 

>. flMIOft 9% 9%— 1% 

- Ill 3 2% 2% —ft 

_ 1138 11% 10ft lift -% 

_ 317 T C, 1 -ft 

z^sr^f «t*« 

Z 8^1% Si 

ziiSJal’ZS 

Z I3B 3ft 3ft 3ft -ft 
_ 196 ft Vo ft -Vi, 

jo x. ^. 2 o Y* 

z&m ^ u -% 

_ 2337 Mft 13% 14ft _ 

.. Bl 10W 9ft 9ft —ft 

J2i 3 J3§J V - Sfe -ft 
Z 3280 1% lft nS -lft 

IJBbXl 180535% 3S 35ft — V, 

... 1296 4% 3ft 4 —ft 
IJ* 4JS 935530ft 29ft 30% -ft 
79 IJ 609422ft 19ft 22V« + 2Ife 

> 3074 7ft 6ft 7% -% 

~ } 2 £ 13 — ^ 

> 5222 13ft lift 13% -% 

>24716 15 13ft 15 -1% 

_ 174 Sft 31% 33ft -1% 

— ,4226 16% 13 15ft +2% 

>1808511% 10ft lOft _ 

733 Sft Sft 5% 

JO 2J 55 18 16% 16ft —ft 

76 ZJ 72831 Mft 30 —1 

_ 9436 20% 18ft 19ft —ft «*««■. 
-22360 18ft 16ft 17% -ft OometSM. 
_ 3090 9% 8% 9 —ft CDfimmet 
107 11% 11% 11% _ OwndSc 


_ 2299 9% 9% 9% _ FoMl 

> 176213% 17% 13 -V. Foster 

> 505039ft 3AHfe 38% —ft «D3ott 

> 575 1 8% 17% 17% _ FrthFn 

> 723 16 14% 15% - % FrttiF pf 

A3 27x11338 18% 17 18% -ft FrthSKfl 

> 200 4% 4ft 4ft —ft FromTc 

JOtllJ 1052 3% 3 3% _ FromSv 

> 6774 30 1 * 28% Mft -2 ! FrrJcBk 


% j ICUMed 
IDBCms 
PFC 
% , tdexxLob 

" IDMEnv 



74 1.1 1 
70 .9 

.100 J 

jo xa 




87441 

^S.!5 
K8W Vft 

766 5ft 5 


_ 3036 4 3% 4 ♦ Vi, CmcBHJ AS 3J 1979 19% 
_ 1279 36fe 2V« 3 -Vu CmcBMO .68 11 1771 32ft 


AmLck 

AMS* 

%£& at > 747 14ft 13% 13% — % | Brauns 

ANtlns 2JA XI 523 47>A 46ft 46Yu — Vi, Brkwt 0 

AmOiHDw > 185 7 6% 6% _ Brcnco 

AmPoc 1655 8% 7% 8% +'i viBrendl 

APtrvG > 920 2% 2% 3ft -ft BrenlBs 

APwrCnv >31507 18ft 17% 17ft —ft BrdaF 

APubfish J3e J 5114 13ft 12% 12% -V, BriteV 

AROCT J4 37 2M 6% 6 6% * % BraBio 

AmReor _ 178 8ft 7% 7% —ft BroodN 

AmSofR* _ 1956 14ft 13ft 13ft — % BrtbdTc 

ASovFL _ 3735 21% 16ft 16ft -4ft BdCStbl 

A5ensors _ 5079 42 35% 37W *1 BrdPort 

ASon J9 *.9 5703 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft BdwvSry 

AStiKfc .08 1.9 1484 «r u 3ft 4% _ Brock CS 

AmSupr - 822 34ft Mft 34 _ Brad5f 

AmTeie 
AT ravel 
AUMCfe 
AVono 
AmWMfe 
AWood 


_ IZ79 3%, 2V« 3 —VS, CmfflMO J8 XI 1771 32% 

> 567 fife =%I CracBVA JOb 2.1 «38 

> 804 1% Vt„ life _ OmOr JO 4.1 278 W 17 17 

JO 17 2*548% 47 48% +1 CmQlB 70 47 250 17% 16 16% 

a 3J 411 13% 12ft 13% —1ft CmceCB a 17 48917 16 16% 

J0bl.9 6316% 16 16 — % 
JO X5 a 9 8% 8% 

> 26513% 17ft 17% — % 

_ 397B21% 20% 20ft— 1% 
_ 384 ft Vj, v» — Ife CWireqy 78 e XO 175 14% 14% 14% — % 

J4 2J 105 19ft 19 19% -ft CmCHNC 73 1 6-5 17414% 14% 14% — % 

70 27 3 9ft 9ft 9ft —1 % ComEnl _ 292 9 'Ife —Ife 

_ 4972 19ft 17% 17% —ft ComEnA _ 90 ft. ■!% >Vb — Vn 

79 e 2.0 99 20 IB 20 +1% ComCTri > 604 15% 14% 15% — % 

.74 2J 210510ft 9ft lOSfe +V H 

170 4.0 31 30ft 38 3B — 

J8» 2.a 43 28% 28% 28% +1 

CmtyBfl S3 U, 246 15% 14% 14% —ft 


JO 17 26548% 47 48% -1 

J U III 13% 12ft 12%— 1% 

> ,182 2% 2% 2% _ 

_ 1782 3% 3ft 3% > CmcBNY 

>23004 Vu Ife ft _ Cmcffloh 

74 1.9 202 121% 11% 12% +ft GnicFdl 
- 384 % Yj. v» — Vu CwlTSov 


J9e2J 99 20 18 M *1% I ComOrl 
J8 1.0 13 a 7ft 7% -ft 

>11471 28 24 % 27% -lft 

> 1061 4% 4% 4% -ft 

> 4990 16ft 15% 15ft— 1 


_ 822 34ft 33% 34 _ BTOOSt 

_ 1844 13% 12% 12ft —ft BklvnBC 

_ IBM 17V, 16% 16% —ft Broofcstn 

_ 1464 4ft 4Vu 4ft, —Vi, Brktree 

_ 16 7 6% 7 -% BrrtOrt 

_ 2902 3% 2ft 3ft —ft BroGour 

- .25 5% 5ft 5ft — Vu BrTwn 


_ 5607 19% 18 1B% +% CPrnFTBk .44 3.0 1961 15% 14Wy 14% 

> 1600 10ft 9ft 10% + Vi CpmFBpf 175 6J 5827% 27% 27ft— 1% 

> 825*65 61% 61 ft— 2ft ComHHti _ 72 2% 2 

> 2964 33% a 33 —ft CommSv > 217315 14% 14ft 

> 99015% 14% 15 _ COmnet _ 2411 10 11 

_ 2077 7ft 6ft 6ft —ft COmpBnc .92 4J 689723ft 22% 23% -ft 


> 25 Sft 5ft Sft — Vu BrTom 
J4e 1.1 1348 3ft 3Wi 3% _ Brunos 


- 338411% 9ft IOVii +1Vi, I CJTWrsl. 
> 916 13% 1216 12ft — % Qnpcm 


2587 Bft Bft Sft +% 
4889 4ft 3 4 tft 


Amerted JO IJ 17744%, 43ft 43ft -ft BrynMw JO 2J xl27 Mft 31% 31ft 


_ 1551 17ft 12% 12%—'%, c«npu«u > 884 7ft 6ft 7 

76 2J 11390 9ft 9 9ft — ft I CmpOotq .10 IJ 34011% 10% 10% —ft 


Aiunn 
AncbBcp 
AncBWis JO 1. 
AnchGm 
AndrGr 

AndvBc JO 2 j 
A ndvToo t _ 

Andrew* 

Andrus 
Allergen 
Arwvsfo 
Artec 
Aperhi* 

ApMon 
AnooEn 


Amrho-J > 356 5ft 4ft 5ft > BuckAm - TSS0 8ft 6ft 7% — 1 gnpttta 

AmeiOra > 772 8% 5ft 7 —V, Buckle -. 20512% 11 11% —ft Cmrt-R 

Ameriwd _ 639 9ft 9% 9% —ft Bullets >22751 1 Oft 9% 10 —ft CptNwK 

Amtad 74 1.1 1802 22% 21ft 22 -ft BuoCrek _ 28513 11 11 —1 CpTOytS 

Amgen _ 73420 56ft 53 53%.— 3%, BuikJT > 233011% 11 IIW -ft CmpPr 

AmBJar _ 298 2% 2 2% -ft BullRun > 565 HV., l«fe Ibfe -ft Cempywr 

Ampto, JSe J 22 18ft 19 18ft —ft BwrrBr _ 192714 12ft 13% —ft OomshT 

Amresoa 70 X3 7120 9V- 9% Bft _ BusinObf > 1652 34 31ft 31ft — % ObstRs 

Amrkm _ 1363 Sft 7% 7ft —ft BusnRc _. 23 35ft 34% 35ft —V, Comtek 

Amtenca J8 J 5138 10% 9V, 9ft — % Butler > 5206 7 5ft 6H -1 Cd elvers 

Arntran Ml 10% 9% 9ft — % BuilrMf ,10e J 1353 35V, aft 34% -% CqlCOm 

Amtroi 70 17x1174 16ft 15ft 16% —ft Butrey > 924 BU 7ft 8 -ft CncEFSs 

AniWBSIF _ 990 9 % 9 Vi 9% —% GoncHIth 

Amylln > 998 7ft 7% Vft _ I a ConcH wt 

AntagiC > 49217ft 17 17>A —ft I S I QmcHW 

ArxXyTc 74 IJ 187 15V, Mft 15% _ ConcCm 

Analysts J2 2J 963 20ft 19ft 20 -% CBrewer > 237 10% 10 10% — % Condor 

Antroei IJOe 6J 2315 15ft ISbfe 15% —Vi C-CUBE > 3591 31ft 19% 19%— lft CtXHktrtW 

M 2ft 2 2 — % CAlWre 1542 10% 10 10 > Coneikja 

5918 15 14ft 14V >, —ft CBQnc 1J0 X? 5833 33 33 —Si GonfTC 

36 27V, 26% 27% -ft CBTCos J4 2J 124 23 71ft 22% —ft Conmod 


3324 15ft Mft lSYu +V H 
> 530 l'lfe IVu 1% -Vu 

JO 4J X249 9% 8ft Sft — % 


_ 134 5 4% 

> 278 8ft 6% 

_ ICQ 9ft 8ft 


I I Freds 
FreshAm 
FrsbChc 

4% 4Wu * Vu I Fretter 
f* 8ft *2% | Freym 
Sft Bft — V, I Friedmn 


26% 

. Th iw 

% 6% 6% —ft IDMEn 
IJ4 3J 4424 33 30 30%— lft 1 IDMwt 

8TA.S ^'J-feilS^ 

73 r 2J 277 9% Bft 9 —1% : IHOPCo 

J2 IJ xlW3r.i 30ft 31% 

70 17 1029 12 11% 11% 

938 9ft 8ft 8ft 


1269 5 41%, 4% —% LouretBc JO 3J 10 12% > 

1142 4% 4% <1%. —Ife LowrSB _ 802 Sft Sft 3% > 

100 6% 5% 5% -W LOWS, J8 17 557 26% 24ft2Stfe— UVu 

746 5% 5 5 — % LwVtTHI .12 1.1 94511% 10% 11 +% 

5243 5% 4% 5% -Vn Luyno _ 322 7ft 6% 7% — % 

LmerTm _ 2281 13ft 11% 13 +% 

; 1 LeddrFn _ 3457 24 22ft 73 —ft 

! 1 LmgCo _ 852024ft 21% 23ft— 1% 

Leosewoy _ 7B2 13V. 12ft 12ft “ft 

_ 12865 22% 17% 20% +3% LsgSohi _ 66B 8ft 8% 8% _% 

> 834 3 2ft 2ft _ Letter: J6t 6J 467 7ft 6% 7% -% 

>15759 10% 10 10ft -Ife Ueetders _ 254318% 17% 17ft — % 

_ 14® 5ft 4% 5 _ LeedsFdi .I2e 1.0 i<6 12% 12 12% —ft 

IJ9 BJ 230 19% Wfe 19V» > Lepent , _ 18472a 28 M -1 

> set!* 4ft 4 4ft —ft LeBCn > im 4% 3ft 3ft —ft 

_ 1841 13ft 12ft 12ft —ft LepGrp > 633 ft U ft ->fa 

>40409 9ft lift 9 _ Unco .09 J6 89316 15 15ft —ft 

> 1428 3 2ft 2ft — V H LesPof J71 4.1 703 14ft 13% 13ft —ft 

_ 5545 30ft 27ft 29*6 *1% LevetOns >10824 20% 17% 20% +3 

> 8232 5ft Sft Sft -ft Lex>ngS JB 3J 521 17% 16 16%— I 

_ 1185 2% 2 2 — % LWyBc J0a ZJ 423 26% 25% 25% — % 

_ 537811ft 10% lift -ft UbBcOK JO a 17 617 32 31% 31% — % 


- • IIS 
ft HLCTc 


875519% 16V. 16% -2% IVAP 


> 836 2ft 1% 1% — 1 FrisBdv 
73997820ft 18ft 18ft —ft Frit* 

_ 123J l'lfe lUfe —ft, I FrzFds 

-1073714ft 13ft Mft -ft I Fulcrum 
_ SOS 5ft 5% 5ft — Vu FulrHB 


A 70b IB 
B 7»b4J 
taBcp J6a 1 J 
32 X8 


_ 5QS Sft 5*.S 5ft — Vu FulrHB 

57 533 10% Oft 10 —ft Fuflons 

_ USB 5ft 4ft 5 —ft Funco 

.. 3177 8% 7 7 —1% Furun 

> 255211% 10ft 10ft —ft FusionSv 

_ 158 9ft 9<4 -9% _ FuturHl s 

> 1667 9% 9 9% * % FlilNow 

47 524 33 24 *% Futrmdia 

_ 25B15 14% 14ft -% 

- 647 13ft 12% 13 + % I 

S l??! 1 - 4% P =8 1 — 

XB «S% ™% »% Vft GBCBc 

fl w«3U^s ask™ 1 


127 3ft 3 3 

1385 3 1ft 2ft 
679 16". 15ft 15Vi 
14V 2 lft lft 
113039ft 38'. 39 
277 16ft 16ft 16ft 
686 14ft 12ft 13ft— 1 
JB IJ 4447 Bft Mft 32Yu_vfe 

209 19ft is% 19.,. 

773 17ft 17V. 17ft 
1 21ft 20ft 21^ 

% 23 

'.. Bft 8% 

2ft 2% 


J7 J 108317 


ft iPLEng XM _ 2421x4,21 


_ 5545 30% 27% 29% *1% LewetOns > 

> 8232 5% 5% 5% *% LexingS J8 3J5 

_ 1185 2% 2 2 — % LbtvBc J0a 2J 

- 537811% 10% 11% -% UbBcOK JOn 17 

- 2262 9 7ft 8ft -ft LbtvHA 78 ZJ 

> 109 4% Sft 3ft — % UbrtvTc - 

_ 1804 6ft 6ft 6ft —ft Lida 

_ 4128 28% 25ft aft -ft UdOk > 

_ 1030 8% B 8% —ft UdOk wIC > 

z ^ A 1 3 0 ttk V&S? 70 ci 

= »iT5«8ratSsr z 


3% -Vu LtfeBcc 
10ft -Vi LteTcii 


- iPLSy 

% . rosoft 

iSG mti 
iSGTech 
iVFAm 
IVFpf 
rvt.Pub 


Imogen 

Imogelnd 


_ 474 3ft 3ft 3ft —ft 1 

= "aw flirts* 

_ 14 6ft 6 6 —M, 

- 7189 IV. life 1% -V B 
JOi _ 1236 3ft 3W, 3%, -Vu 

-Iff IP 

Z 619 Mft 13ft Lift 


UMrwS 

LJHoons 


78 ZJ 9 9ft 9ft 9ft -% 

- 681 4% 3ft 4 — % 

_ 9S> 3 2% 2% _ 

> 6542 2ft 2 2Yu t ft 

> 322 1% 1% 1% — life 

_ 5515 9V. 8ft 9ft — Ife 

70 1.1 7218ft 18% 11% — % 

> 3874 Bft 7ft 7<Vu —Ife 

> 1663 4ft lft 4% -ft 

z 3ft as TS 

_ 899 11% 11% 12 —ft 

> 31412% 10% 12% *1% 

78 XO 701 14 13% 13% +% 

>1604139% 136 138% -lft 
-20429 28% 25ft 27ft -lft 
1-60 ZB 16 58 56% 56% — % 

■“ ” -a?*® 

74 '27 *182 SVC 7ft 8% 


J2 16 30 12% lift 12% -Itanmon 

_ rose 8% 7_V. 8% -‘V:. I ImurtRso 


19% 17ft 1B% -% . bnuraec 
4% _% . 


_ 146 2ft 2% 2ft _ GKB > 427 5 4% 4% — ft.lmunxwt 

= «W p R TS - “ Iff??? 5 ' IP 8 _s ! SSS? 


> 619 14ft 13ft 13ft — V 

= «» WT? 

z^SaS Sft » :i 

_ 3009 7% 6% 6% —6 


UMOTTC 78 J 23282 
^mpf ,71 * « 

HE i'** 


_ 5606 3% Z% 3 -ft GTSDrtk 

.16 .9 1301 18% 17% 18% _ G— III 

> 226 1 ft ft -Vu CZA 

> 393 2ft 2ft 2ft —V. Griev 

> 1125 4% 3% 4% -ft GrXUeo 

.66 X0 54932% 31 31ft -ft Gombros 

_ 1556 3ft 2ft 2ft — % Gametek 

_ 8470 4ft 3ft. 3% —ft GamtngW 

> 335 1% 'Vu T/u -Vm GamWwt 

- 3955 14% 12% Mft + 1% GancDtg 
_ 80 5 4% 4% —ft Gander 

_ 311322ft 20ft 22% ♦ % vfGantoi 
_ 95710ft 9ft 10% -ft GardDen 

„ 141 6ft 6% 6% *% Gomet 

_ 513 2ft 2ft life _ Gainers 

_ 336 9 7% Bft —ft Gasortcs 

_ 268 6ft 6% 6ft - % GcfeTOOO 

_ 5198 8ft 8% Bft —ft GtwBcp 

_ 44517ft 12 12% —Ife Gtwyln s 

_ 1B37 lft wfe 1 —% Geariwa 

77 « 17 15033ft 22% Mft —ft GeM 

JO XB a 17 16 16 — % GnCrHtt 

_ 203 2ft 2 2ft _ Gencor 

_ 266 7 Sft 6ft —ft GaneLTc 

> 293 17 16 16% -ft GeneMed 

>11426 17ft 15ft 17ft -ft GnAtIRei 

.10 21 1 3ft 3ft 3ft —ft GnBnd 

> 454542% 39 41 Vu -ft, GnCbm 

Jle 17 15552 48% 48% —8 GnCpt 

_ 331210ft Vft IDVu -Ife GnMoo 
>4411623 20 20 —a G«Nulr 

> 143 8 7% B +% GnPDra 


_ 274 3% 2ft 3'i - V, 

_ S94 4ft 3'a 4ft — W InFOCU -1128328ft 25% 28 Vi 

> 479* 17% 14'i 17 -1% InHome _ 3480 2ft 2Vu 2ft 

_. 659 4ft 4 4% —ft InaCom _ 2569 9ft 8ft 9ft 

s .17# I J 4a lift 10ft lift —ft Inbrands _ 388714% 12% 14 

. _ 9t?3% 2ft 3 -ft IncoHm _ 1059 2% 1% lft 

N _921«ft Sft 3'V|, — Vj. j hVContml > 320 12 11V, 12 

it _ 905 ft ft ft — Vu Indec+lld J2e J 941 31ft 3 3ft 

> 2576 p-u Mu »»fe -Vu fndBkAAA J4e 7 3180 Sft 5ft 515 


3’t - ft j IrnoCrd 1.14111 J 


z isS’Ak 3 % ’a? tm 

- W .2. 1% 1% -V 


15% 15ft —ft 
9% 9ft— lft 


\s& 

s 

UxJcD 


L9 *182 BS 7% 8% -1A 
- 20* 30% 29% 30% *% 

tJ 827 73 30% 21ft —ft 

f siarss ;s 

EJsR Ji 

ElCfcftil* 


> 3887 14% 12% 14 


_ 753 3% 

_ 306 7% 


w ss 

fI 


tph n% 

a a 


h. S Es 


176 P-U 1V.» l»M -Vu IndBkAAA J4e 7 3180 Sft 5ft Sft > Loftsrvf 

>64 18 MV. 17% - % ' IndBUVIl 30 X6 63 23V. 22V, 22% _ Lotus 

'652’Vu IT. 2 — (Vi, | Indlnsr 74 27 *300 12% T0% 10% — 1% Lowron 

116 10% 10ft 10ft > ; IndTeiM - 1657 lUfe 1ft, lft — Vu Loyota 

194 3% 3% 3ft -ft 1 IndiFdl % Jfl 3J 349 16ft 16% 16% +% Ulfllta 

03 34% 31'.. 33 - lft ] IndUtd J4bX7 40 24% 33 24 — % Lunor 

15121 18% 19 — lft ImfiooNV > 6235 1VU 15ft 16% > Lundtal 

‘42 24ft 22ft 22% — inAnxn JO 17 17 15*. 15% 15ft -ft 

4411% I0V1 10% — % IndusHW _ 730 3% 3 3ft, -V* B 


LondOvr .10e 7 11514% 14% 14% -% 

SSi 

UW® 1 _ 679915% Mft Mft -lft 

LnoStk - 1255 9 8 % 8% -ft 

LoronCx _ 1039 6<A 6 6% - % 

LDttervE Jit 107 3060 6% 4% 5 —1% 

Lotus >78560 4.0% 37%38Wu— «fe 

Lowrcnc _ 1599 4% 3% 4ft -ft 

Loyrto JO 2J 565 20ft 19% 19% —ft 


JO 37 136 16% M'i 16% - 

Z 100319% 17% 18% -If 


Jir J 44 11% lOVi 10ft — % IndusHW 
_ 31 4 3ft 3% _ IndSo 

_ 223014'., 12% 13% — % IMTm 

_ 1754 7ft 7ft 7Hf u - V„ IntnErt i 

- 'T’lWft «* % — % [ LntoSott 

_ 63 12% 12% I2*i —V. IrrfoAm 

_ 5554 2ft lft 2 — % intaintl 

_ 1W1 3% 2ft 2ft —ft IrtRsc 

_ » ISft 15 IS — % InfoRes 

JO 1.9 244 73 21 21 —1 Informix 

_ 1670 4ft 4V, 4% _ infrasne 

_ 246 9% 8% 8% — % InfuTedi 

.12e 3J 196+ 4 4 -ft ingfMfcf 

-39958 27ft 24% 27ft *2% IntialTll 
74 1X8 220 lft lft lft _ Inmoc 


IJ 17 15ft 15ft 15ft -ft 

_ 730 3% 3 3%, -Vu | I 

> 11123% 22% 23% +1 | fifi J 

2 8% 7% 7% —1 

_ cm 31 'A 79% 31 Vi — 1 U-Wawe > 37316 14% 16 -% 

- *22 2E* MGProd _ _ 31S3 7 2 2 -4% 

- ™ —Ye MAF0CP .Me J 203 21% 21% 71 'A — % 


5ft — Vu MAFBaP -Me J 
8 —1 MARC 


> 492 12% 11% 12%. -life MBLA 
>37332 17% 14% 15ft. ->V» MO 
>39735 a TSVtTSh,— l"fe MDL Info 
_ 768 3% 3% 3ft —ft MOT 0, 

_ 527 2>4 1% 2% ♦% MFBCfe 

J6 i9 17011ft 10% 11% -ft MFRI 
_ 2W 8% 7% 8% -ft MFSCm 

_ 719 6% 5ft 6 + % MG) Ptir 

z ijgL %.%-% 

_ 22a 9% 9 9% —ft MK Rrtl 

Jit X9 1554 5ft SJfe 5% —ft MLFBC 

_ 1530 6ft 5% 6 > MLX 


203 21% 21% 71% —% 

in 12 % 11 % 11 %— 1 % 


> 3 5% 5% 5ft — ft GenesCn 170a 11 67 Mft 36% Mft -1% 


5376 VA 6ft 7 
.367 5% 4% 4ft 


3607 3% 3V„ 3% +Yi» 

23251 39% 38% 38% — % EngWSt j 
2387 14ft 13% 14 -ft EnexRs 
2246 3%. 3ft 3% — Vu EngnSu 
518 4 3ft 3% —ft EngiWea 


Encorew 

I Endsonc 
EnaBioxy _ 

Engyntti 1.12 6J 
EngvRsfi 

Engwsts J8 4.1 


.12 X4 11 5 4% 5 -ft GeneThr 

_ 14991 27% Z3% 26ft — % Genetlraf 

_ 606 9ft 8% 9ft -lft Genian 

J8a J 1752 16 15% 15% _ Gerfyte 

> 43 9% Bft 8ft —ft Genome 

_ 37B1 22ft 20ft 20ft— 1% GensiO 

> 1357 TVS 6% 6ft —ft Gerald wt 

_ 325 life 1% lft, > Gerta 

_ 330 6% Sft 5ft — "fe Gentex 

_ 2269 3% 2ft 3% -ft Genu* 

_ 1308 16 15% 15% — % Genzvm 

_ 575711% 10% 11 — % Gen* wt 

_ 381417ft 15ft 15% —ft Genzvwt 

„ 8234 4Vu 3ft 3Afe — «fe Genzy Tr 

> 3402 17% 15 15Vu— l>Vu Geodyn 

> 564 7ft 7 7 —ft GMasan 

— 243 8 6% 7% > Grflnd 

.12 6J 55 17ft 17 17 — % GaoTk 

_ 10510% 9ft 10 > Goowarks 

M 4.1 75 9% 8% 9% -ft GeriMed 

70 27 117 9% B% 9% — % GrmSv 

> 20* 4 3ft 4 -Vi GiantCmt 

. ... 9 3% 3% 3% > GtaPat* 

— _ GlbrSI 


1761914% 12 13% - lft I EnoBim .16 1.9 260 9V, BV, 8% 


_ 32 2% 2 


— % CA1 Wre 


_ 157 17ft 17ft 17% _ CCA 


- 1406 4Y, 4% 4% 


1941 3 2% 2% — ft EnSy* 

5320 25 23% 24 —ft EntFfetfB 

1498 6% 5ft Sft —ft Envrgen 
3465 lft IVi, 1% —ft EnwSvc 
1542 9% 8% 9% *1, EflvToCP 
8042 2 1% IW* +% EflVTc Wt 

59 3% 2% 2ft -ft EnvWste 
200 5 4% 4% —V, EnvtWurt 

179911% 10ft 10ft —ft Envtae 
1097 5 4M 4ft —ft Envsrc 
1861 7A 21% n% -lft Environ 


_ 818 7% 6% 7% •»% inriwdyn 

_. 2241 41% 40% 40ft _ makers: 

„ 1036 2ft 2ft 2ft —Vi Imadata Jit 5.9 1554 5ft 

- Ml £ft 4Vj 4ft -VV inavGme - 1530 6ft 

- 17M TVo l'lfe lft — Vu Irmovex 

-ItlgJ, 4ft 4% —ft bntek 

- 889 W| ft ft —ft Inpbvnet 

> 64« 7% 6% 6% — % Inputs 

> 5892 aft 23% Sft —ft IraoFfl 

_ 6651 7 6’i 6Vu -Vu Inslleo 

_ 10178 a', i 30% 30ft— 2% In Site Vis 
_ 959 14V, lift 11%— 7% IrabE 

> 1116 7ft *'u &ft — lft InsitMd 

- 1377 3 2% 3 * ft luifTc 

a 17 69 8V. 7% 7% > IraAut 

JZe 27 85 20ft 19% 19%—' lft (ntegrocr 

_ 1B2 * Sft Sft > IntegCln: 

..14405 9% 7ft Bft— tft, InigOv 

_ 939 9 8ft 8ft _ IntgMiC 

_ 1067 2ft 2Vu 2’fe _ IntsaSv 

JO IJ 534*1% 60ft 61% -ft ItaSri 

_ 4948 14ft 13% 13% —ft IntoWtf 

_ 387 Bft 7ft Bft _ IntgMu* 

_ 3700 11ft 9% 11W-1 Intel 
JO 27 253+15% 14% 14ft — % tntefwt 
.12 J 12555 16% 15 15*4 _ IntSrwlA 

_ 59 6ft 9¥u 6% +% IniSrwtB 

_ 3131 14% 13% Loft, — Va irolSras 

JO 57 7014% 13ft 14% — h rnretB 

> 45*8 9% 8% Bft —ft IntrTdf 

> 971 6% 5ft 6 -% InlwSvg 

J8aX6 70 iBft I7>i lBYl -ft intern 

_ 9061 63ft *0 60% ♦ % IfflNtWK 


72 1.9 245611% 10% 11% -% MNU 


_ 373 4ft 4 4 —ft CCS Fn 1J6 3J 620 41 V, 38Wfe 39%— 2ft Consep 
2J 152516% 15ft 15% — 1 ft CCOR _ 5532 54% 51% 51ft— 2 CamSv 


ConnWT 1 J4 6J 134 24% 23% 24% 


t _ 55 2ft 2ft 2ft — % CDP Tcfi 

_ 9516 a 48% 49 —4 CDW i 

_ 143517% I7'i 17% _ CE Son 

_ 334 3 2% 3 -ft CEM 

_ 484 7 5% 6ft — % CF Bcp 

_ 7997 28% 26ft 26% —1 CR Ind 

_ 820912% 10% 10% — 1% CF1 Pro 
_ 149212% 10% 12 -ft CFSB 
J2 IJ 5381 IHft 16% 17% -1 CFWCm 


L3 WV,iniW«|#n !T 

_ 553254% 51 Vi 51ft— 2 ConaSvs .12 IJ 

> 969 9 % 9V4 9H ♦% CortSilm 

~ 2744 31 ft 28% 31 -2% 

_ 403 3ft 2% 3% -VW „ 

> 918 13 12% 12% — % CortPd 

7 2 25 25 H -ft Conjoin 

> 55 4ft 4ft 4% -% Con^rr 


. EnwuvOi 

829 3% 2ft 3 —ft Eraon 
3712% lift 12 — % EpicDes 
1183 6ft 5% 6 — % Eguicrdt 

7714% 14 14 —1 Eoinnax 

. . 418 19% 19% 19% ♦ » Eauifex 

J3t XI izu io% io% 10ft — % Enuttrc 
.. 301 7% TVu 7Vu —ft. EquityCp 

208 15% IS 15% ‘ 


> 790 4ft 3ft 3ft— 1 CbmC JO 27 2534 15% 14% 14% —ft buetwt 

- 834 12% lift lift —ft GsdLew .12 712555 16% 15 15ft _ IntSrwT. 

> 425 2 lft 1% -% GtaaTr _ 59 6% 5>¥u 6ft +% ImSrwfl 

> 91 2% lUfe ms, — Vu GOatSat _ 313114ft 13%1VV»— »» Irt1&«s 

> 74 8% 8 8% * Vu GBbtA ja 57 70 MVi 13% 14% — % rntetS 

~ 109 2 liVfe lift, — Vu GBead > 4**8 9% Bft 8% —ft IntrTel 

_ 3920 1% Ife Ife —Vi Gone, > 971 6ft 5% 6 -ft InlwSvg 

> 4836 ft V* Vm —ft, GtaBc J8a2J 7B 1B% 17>i 18% -% Intern 

_ 200 3 % 2ft 3ft —ft Gtenayrs _ 9061 63'. i 60 60ft -ft IntNtwfC 

> 255 3% 3% 3% —ft Gtabllnd t > 2515 24% a% 24% -ft Intraga 

> 1151 13 11% 12 — % GlbMktl 1403 5% 5Vu 5% -% InterCEi 

_ 878330ft 19 199k —ft GIMMun - 82? I *Vfe % - inteMBfc 

> 3167 2% 2% 2% _ GtaVHaa _ 3100 9% 8% 9% - % tnlrfcfn 

_ 8026 24% 71 23% -% Gfycomd > 1589 2% I'Vu l'lfe > interft 

> 1620 29% Mft 29 — Vu GaWEn J6 6J 28 7% 6% 6% _ Irttfm 

> 929 7 6% 7 *% GWPaul ,04b J x46 7ft «% *% — % Interflm 

> 827 2 2% Fife -Ife GldnSy5t _ 1850 1% 1% Ilk — % Infant, 

> 811 4% 4% 4ft _ GUnBk* JOblJ 1 38 38 38 -TVu I n ter im 


_ 153 1% 1 1 > MR] Mot 

” PSIi* >«* 10ft -ft MRSTcfi 
_ 9193 72 19% 19% —2% MR V Cm 

_ 116220ft 19% 19ft — % MRVwt 

- 282927 26ft 26% —ft MS Car 

_ 746 5% 4% 5% > MSB BCP 

J5 IJ 1425 Wu 2% 2'Vi* -Ife MTCEI 
.14 IJ 130110ft 9% ID _ MTITctl 

- 311713% 17% 12% —ft MTLlnc 
_ 1Z40 3S 31% 34% -2% MTS 

_ 972 8ft 7 7W, — Vu MDrrrti 

> 2848 10 9% 9% — % MB a 

> 69300 30V, 27% 28ft +1 ft MooeSec 

> 746 9% 9% 9% > Mocheez 

zsras flns&f SSS^d 
KSSt 

J4PJ 185380 63% 60% 60% —lft MogRtV 
>16750 14% 13% 13% —ft Mood 

- S5 U> J5* •***» 

_ 272 Ife 'fe ft > MogmP 

«yi Z9» — Vu MaundSl 


MBLA 70e IJ 46 14ft 14% 14% —ft 

Ma JS 71719S1 23% 22 22ft —ft 

MDL MO > 2027 Bft B% 8% > 

MOT Cp > 627 6% 6ft 6W 4 % 

MFBCP > 9112% 12ft 12ft —ft 

MFRI _ .2308 6ft 5% 6ft - % 

MFSCm >1622441% 37 40% -3% 

MGlPhr _ 2686 6ft 5% 5% —ft 

MHMever JUeZO 898 1% life lft — Vu 

MIC Gad _ 720 4% 4 4% -ft 

MKRrtl .16 IJ 13189 9% Bft 9 — % 
MLFBC > 2776 1 5ft 14% 14% —ft 

MLX . _ 100 Sft 4% Sft —ft 

MMI .160 4J x!8 4% 4 4 > 

AMU Met _ 607 5% Sft 5% + ft 

MRSTcfi 654 6 5ft 6 

MRV Cm >1601316% 12ft 14% —ft 

MRVwt _ 312111% 7ft 9% — 1 

MS car 306634V, 22% 24 -ft 

MSB BCP J2 2J 28821% 21 % Z1W —ft 
MTCEI >1032? 4tfe 3% 4lfe -Ife 

MTITctl _ 3199 4% 3ft 4 —ft 

MTLlnc „ 77815ft 15 15 —ft 

MTS J* 2J 40 33ft aft 23ft > 

MDrmd JO IJ 5641ft 39ft 41W -1 

MBg JO > 58 13ft 13% 13% —% 


” # ^Sr5r' 517 5!? +,w mocbSoc > 712 2% ru 2 — w, 

- Si SP ££ . ^ _ too 10 9% 9% - % 

- SZ5 ?5J? ?5 Z4V|, * 1ft. MockFfl .12 > 242 6% dfe 6ft, > 

- 308 17ft M 17 -2ft Mocramd >15092 21% 19% Mft > 

- Sft* TJ* —V* Modo* . _ >10083 12 10ft 11% -ft 

_ 4030 10% 9ft 10ft > ModGE 1J8 57 234 33ft a a _ 

J4dJ 185380 63% 60% 60% —lft ArtesPtte >10623 7% 1% mfe— Pfe 

-iraiw 13ft IM -ft mS 3 > 1005 4% 3ft r? -2 

- ffl JJfe ft* Vu —Ife AAodSH _ 4T8 6ft 5% 6 — Vu 

£2 v? Vb % > MogmP —21568 aft 36 36%—% 

> _-g 1DW 3*»» 2Jfe — Vu AAogndB I J4 17 x146 21 19% 20% —ft 
JO XJ25BM17 ISft 16ft +% AAobGP 7* 3J 645 20% 20 Mft — % 

- 3735 Hi Bft 8ft — ft lUapldll _ 390 5% 4ft Sft — ft 

JO X3 431 13% T3W 13ft —ft Atofeska _ 12615ft 14ft Mft ” 


— ——i 4 4ft -Vu MaBBH _ w ib », id -ft 

— 4956 3ft 3% 3ft — ft MofnSf > 5389 3% TVu 3*6 -ft, 

.18 22 TO 8% 8 BW -ft MuiiSCB 74 17 402 15ft 14ft 14ft Jfc 


> 2396 Mft T3*fe Mft -ft GaffEnl 
J8e8J 253510% 10ft TOft —'ll GoodGV 
_ 434 5% 4ft 4ft —ft Goodm * 


> 408 13ft 11% 13% +2ft mtrtoaf 


. . - 1134 17 15ft 16ft —V, OSTCfl 

AppteC JS 179779649ft 40 40%— 1% CMC Ind 

ApiSou* -07 .1 7670 ltft 15% 16% +% CMGInf 

Aplebees J4 7 19921 20ft 17ft l*Qfe • Ife CN8 


_ 667 5% 5ft 5W -ft GdyFam 

JOe 1 J 2*821 61ft 58% 59ft— 1% Goman 
_ 9644 13 lift 12 —1 GaulcF 


> 486613 lift 12W -1 Intertmq 

J 49616ft 15V, 15% > IntrCm 

> 2B33H 9% 9% —ft tafmetC 


»21fe 21 21Vu — Tu I fntCrflsS 


ApiRecy 

AtWExft 

ASicad 

AptCobn 

AptDgtl 

April mu 

Aodlngv s 

ABMMOll 

ApdMlcr 

ApdSd 

Apfdwt 

ApkJSo 

Aquognx 

Aqgnxwt 

ArabSh 

Aramed 

AronEgy 


_ 291 7ft 7 


_ 394511% lift HU —ft CMS 
4602 S'* 5ft S'* — % CPAC 
_ 1183 Ife Ife Vm -Vm CPB 
>12891 Mft Mft 26ft +2 CPI Aem 
_ 1587 5% 4% 5ft *■% CPIwt 

> 741 Z4ft a 23 —lft CRH 

>60667 52% a 4SU-3W CSBFn 

_ at 3% 3% 3% —•/, ese Hid 

_ 439 7ft 6% 7ft —Ife CSP 

_ 113 ft *V D «fe — V» CTEC 

_ 309 4% 4 6ft _ CTL Cr 

_ 1940 6ft 6ft 6ft —ft CU Bnc 

> 1864 2ft 2 3ft - Vs CblDsgn 

.. 34 1% lft 1% -ft Coblmox 


— ft CNBFNY 1.16 2J 12 64 41 41 —1 CtSaypf 72 64J IW 1% 1ft lft —ft 


_ 993 14ft 13ft 14 -ft CcnaFn JS 2J 16 2 2 2 —ft EatvMkt 

27 308 20ft 19V, 19% —ft CnsFnpf J5 II J 2 7ft 7ft 7ft _ EqfO* 

10 415 MW 17ft 18ft— 1% CouWol 1.18 6J xWlBft 17ft 18 —ft ErlcTuI 

> 7815 Sft 2ft 20fe * Vo Cbnfta _ 837 24% 24 24ft -ft Erratt*n 

> 45T 4ft 3% 4ft -ft atCCOre _ 1075"fe 5% S' Vi. -«fe Esailde 1J6f307 3M 5ft 4% 4H — % GvtTch _ 3263 13ft 12% 12% — Vu InfCble 

_ 1101 16% Mft 14% -ft aiCCwt 1014 1 ft % > Eskimo 70 1.1 848 19 1A% 18ft -IW Govett 1.14# 5J *723% Mft Mft —ft InDtfrA 

J8b 2J 181 34% 34 34% -ft aiMIU JO 4J 30 Mft 14 14 > Esmar 46 1 <6 23110ft 10 10 —ft Gradco > 906 4ft 3% 4V U -Vu InDalrS 

. .. -- - — ... — - — 1J2 6J 63 25H 24 ft 2Sft -1 GroffPnv > 3291 10% 9% 10ft —ft Inti mag 

> 175 7% 7 7 —ft GronBd _ 174 7 6ft 6% —ft IntJen 

_ 321012ft lift lift — % GronBdpHJ* SJ 2636% 35% 36ft -ft ItOPlr 
_ 10 Zft 3ft 2ft _ GmfeC JO J 16540% 21ft 21ft — % k«Post 

_ 128 4W 4 4 —ft GrontSt 32 2J 37 lift lift 11% —ft IntRsb 

JSe J 28917 15ft 15% -ft gmtGea - 2?£ 3% 3"fe 2«Jfe —Vo MjTottg 

JB AB 3222 17% 16% 16% —ft EVBTMed > 1498 18ft 17ft 17% — % GtTltT Pf _ 62913% 13% 13ft —ft Intmu 

174218% 17% 17% — % EvorMpf 3J0 67 20644% 44 44% -ft Grphln J7 7 64410ft 9ft 10 ♦% tatmwtB 

447* 18U 15 16 -.2% EvemRi > 301 8 7ft 8 +% GLARc >31173. Ife V» V* — Vu Imptes 

1M7 5V„ 4% 4Wu — ft Exabyte >2069124 21% 20% +% GrtBay JO 17 382 1 Wk 18% 18% -ft Intant 

ai214ft 11% 12% — % Exars _ 2111 22 20 22 -2 GCtryfi _ 94 2% 2% 2ft —ft Intpare 

321118% 17ft 18ft —ft Excrtb > 1233 8ft 7Vi, Ttk -% GrtFfXJ JSe Jx3975 15+« 15ft 15ft -ft IntscCcw 


_. 2447 8 6ft 7Rfe -Hfe S'®* 

76 17 63215V, lift 15V, -ft CrwSrt 

JH 3.6 4626 24% 24ft > COOPrO 

- 3803 7 6ft 6% -ft C OOPfi. 

> 4004 4ft 3bfe 4Vi -Ife CoooBk* 

1J4e37 9Z7%27%27%— ft CaqraB 

JO 11 28514% 14 141fe -Ife Copat 

> 767 26 2S 25 — W Owjmfb 

_ 501 8% 8ft Sft _ £°FVte* 

> 351 Mft Mft 27ft - ft CorTbor 

_ 55510% 10 10% +ft Coi~GobF 

- 769 8 7ft 7ft -ft SS" 

2551 19% 18% 18% _ l 

_ 789 6ft SVi 5% —Vi Cof«CFS 


4947 6Va 6W 6ft —ft 

«n 1 % tvu lft *-*, 

42ft 2% 2 ft 

17210% 9% 10ft 

„ _ 6218ft 18ft 18ft 

JO XII 8222 17% 16% 16% — % | EVDTMed 


- 891 13 12W 12% —ft AAoklM 

J6 IJ 220»ft I9ft Mft -% McSon 
74 XI X14S9 11% lift lift —ft kftcutm 
.16 IJ asm 8ft 7% 84k -% MoM.Il' 

_ 257 2ft 1% 1% — Vu MonuPbt 

_ Ml 7ft 6% 6% — H Mcntnto 

- 5 S-S 3 S. £&. Sit « <rtFn 

_ 2250 25ft 22ft 22ft— 2% Macon 

> 5092 4 ft 3% 4% +U MorcNG 

- 1651 5ft 4% 5ft _ Martet 

- 236711ft 10ft 10% _ AAarDri 

_ 1935 7 6ft 6ft —% MarinerH 

.16 3J 1*5 Sft 5 5ft _ MarCcp 

> 441* 2% 2 2ft McrinC 

> 3563 31% 30ft Mft —ft MkTwrtn 

- 1304 17 14ft 16% Zft TXotvSn 

_ 3416ft 16ft 16ft -ft Market 

- 2879 27 24% 26% -1ft iWlarturi 

> Z74 10 7% 9ft -lft MMFtt 

> 2951 1% IW* lft — Vu MauEl 

- 665 9 Sft Bft -VS Mason 

J2 J 049 Zft 2% 2% — MrshSB 

- ?U5 lft 5% 3* —ft Mrxnsu 


.lie IJ 41 19ft 18% 18% —ft 
... - 157 3% 2% 2% —ft 
.171 4.9 76 3% 3% 3ft —ft 

> 1 4 4 4 —ft 

> 1M7 8% 8 Bft 

_ - 450124% 19ft Mft -3ft 

J2 19 559 11% 11 II —ft 

> lira 10 9ft 9ft _ 

_ 1632 4ft 2% 2% —ft 

- JJS2 7¥ * *•* — v, 

>35593 4 % 3% 4ft -Vu 

> 44559% 22 23% —ft 

JO 3J 210 17% 16ft 17ft -ft 

> 416 15% Tuft 14% —ft 

.9* 15 2119 27% 24% 27ft — % 

_ 1371 10% 10% 10% -ft 

> 10041% 40% 40% — % 

184 7ft 7 7ft —ft 

J2 4J x31 8 7ft 8 Z 

_ 62319% 19 19% -ft 

_ 187714 12ft 12% —ft 

J4 43 538 10% 10% 10% _ 

J4 «J 255 12 II 11 _ 


1718 5% Sft 5ft — Vi I Marshlb JO 2.9 7130 39% h m. **T, 

3Wil% % 1 % e.% MSS3K > 3wfS% lOft low -% 


Z 38611ft lift lift _ COtxKM IJliaj 960 5% 5 S% — ft CrnrFn 


> 33 19ft 18% 18% -% Cache 


ArbarOrg 74 1.1 16M21%aft31% - ft I CAQ 


ARXXHI 

ArtkNtl 

ArchCm 

ArctiPts 

Aretcos 

Arden 

ArtfanPd 

Aretfiuso 


- ,540 6ft 5% 4% -ft COilmag 

_ 5440 12 llftliWu -W Com&Bt 


Z 3127 21% 19ft 19%— 1 ! CatJbyS l.!7eAl 1265a% 2BW MW —ft Qrtpt 


u^uu, _ 87714ft 13% Mft -ft Codeln 

_ 53293 21% 22 — % CUdiz 

> 1029 2ft I'Vu 2% -ft Cnfcnui 70 1.1 

.19 .9 5468 21 19ft 20ft _ Caere 

_ 551ft 51ft Sift— 2ft Cairn 

... 58210 SM 9 Vi —14 Calgen# 

> 998 1 1 Li 10V, 10ft — % CdAm 

ArgenfB JO 37 1736ft 35 25 _% CaBnc 76 XI 

ArgoGp 1.16 Alxll68 28% 28% MW —ft CPfifCUl 

AraSr > 5451 18 16% 17ft -ft CMFnd .44 3J 

AtoloFTi _ Ml Sft 2 2ft +% CdIMD 

ArtadP - 1749 1% lft lft —ft CaUWc 

Ariadwt > 6E> 'Vfe % ft -Vu CoiSBM JO 3J 

Ailrtot* - 93 6 5ft 5ft —ft CofanP 

ArtSw .oi 7x1522 13% 12% 13 -ft Cutaway 

Armor J4 19 1941 22% 21% 22 —ft Cbfumef 

Arnolds J4 XI 3847 Hft lift 21 ft — % ComNtg 

ArrtSti _ 171 6% * , 6 — % Combos 

ArowFn J8bX4 599 14% 14Vi, T4V4 — ft Canbffc 

ArawSit .12 J ^ MS?! 

Arrow Tm „ 575 5W 4% 4% — % CorrtiTcti > 

ilSt Z 19922 10% m 10ft +ft CdmmAsh 

ArtStC JBi _ 1376 4ft 3'i 3ft ■*-% LomooB 

Srtw™ _ 129 8ft 7ft BU > CWJneB 

2 sente Z 1674 Sft 4% 4% -Vu CWlneA 

AscertlC > 823034ft 30% 3VA— 2ft Omdata 

_ S44 9ft 8% 9 -V. Cmdte 

- 9214511ft 10ft II -ft ConnExp 

> 482535ft 33% Mft —ft Omil&S - 

30 TJ 13814% 13 14 -ft Canon} Jlo J 

^pSrc ... 662217% 15% 17 — % C oiQrtte - 

Asfflnc 1JS W X23034V, SW 33ft -% Cnrater 70 > 

3509 2*ft 25 25ft - ft Conk* > 

Z raijsw B 25% —ft Cqntal 

aSS^ _ 145815% Mft 15% -ft Cortibry _ 

aSELf _ 3582 29 MW 28% -ft, Comjts _ 

Xm .12 1.1 4510ft 10% 10ft *V» CCBT Me U 

MteSn jle J 79 2% 2 2 > £*5* „ ,» 

ZSrmr - 482 4W 4ft 4Vk _ CopBnC 2.9 

jlfr^ - 148521ft H% a — % CopBAPf 

AwdTch ~ Ifln »7ft 15% 15ft— 1% I CdPSwas .T5e 1.1 


Asonte _ 

AscendC 

Aseca 

Asnwrtn 

Aspccn 


> 613 V/ B life Mfe _ Corttwt 

> 1242 5% 4ft 49k — Vk CartWI 

70 1.1 9a 18 17ft 17ft — Ife Cava* 

-C5196 19% 14% 18% +3% Oryol 
~ JH 8 7% 7% _ 

_ 9132 9 8% 8% _ __ 

_ 2503 7 5W 6ft -1 CEttCP 

76 XI 65718ft lift 18% - 

_ 2438 6% *Vi Wfe -ft CQo rar 


.44 3J 98015% 14% 14% — % 92S*? 1 
>10211 4 % 5 % Bi — Vu SEES , 5 m 
>108332% Kft 32ft -! CrttBrt J2 
JO X6 Mil 10W 11 -ft Crtfmde J4 
_ MS lift 11 lift +ft Oogm 
_ 432 lft 1 IW -ft 
_ 034% SPA 34U > CrTtflLS 

- 2213 4% 3% 4 Vi -ft goffly* 

> 298 4V6 3% 4ft — Vk OJACP* 

> 367 5ft 4 4% —life 

> 1100 9 8 Bbfe+Ofe Cre*Air 

> 7127 19ft T7% ISlfe— >fti CfW^Wt 


284 4 3ft 4 
1411160ft 56 St 
1403816 1416141%*— IVu 

119 6 5ft 6 -ft 

,992 16 ISft 15ft —ft 

5006 24ft 22VA 23 W -Vi 

4g417 16ftl60fe-V u 
2S8 9% Wt 9W — % 

2766 3W 2ft 3 Vi -ft. 

1092 2ft 1% 1% —% Exstar 

.360 73% 9lft 22% +lft|EZ»ny 
173418ft 15 15W— J 

,33317ft 15ft 15ft — 2 
-IU >6168010% 9% 10 —ft 
.16 IJ 231 fift Bft Bft — % 

JO 27 14 18ft I6W 18ft -2W 


-ft ExdTd, 

-% ExCfTwf > 269 1% life 1% 

— ExefTepf JSe 6.1 24 6ft 5% SPA 

ExecTl 1721217 6634 7 4% Jft 


1233 8ft 7Vi, 7ft — % GrtFfXJ J8e JW975 15ft 15% 15% *W IntscCw 

232* J% 4ft 5 —ft GtLteAv > 1239 5 Pf 4% -ft JntCWwt 

869 1% life 1% -Vu GtLkBc 1J4I 7J IBM 25% 25% 25% — Vk Inierelv 

24 6ft 5% 5% — % GtLkwt .. IW 4Jfe 4W 4W _ lartrans 

6634 7 4% 5ft — % GtLkpi lJOtlOJ 87 10 9% 10 -% IntvisB 

7642 3% 3Vri 3Vu -ft GtSoBC* JO X5 15817ft 16% 17ft _ Intvrtce 


- 3064 13ft II 12 —Vo MOM 

- ,6M Wt 8 9ft TS mStSi 

- ’fg » Bft 8% -ft ModCoi 

- »• AAdFcSc 


jo ,2 fJis \& =8 saw. ii'xS “S ft p ift Tts 

* - w ie =z ■“ " lav* w ^ =3 

■“ J IIS S si MatnP *' - aw 14% 13% 13% 


MOtefc - 90* 9 Sft 8% - ft 

sss^ z zur 's 8 r.r 

MdFcSc M IJ 37*27 25% 76 — 1 

Mosiond .15c J 2347 16ft 15% 16 —ft 


-17642 3% 3Vfi 3Vu -ft GtSoBc* JO X5 158 17ft 16W 17ft _ Intvrt 

_ 270917% 16ft 17 -ft GrtWofl J30A1 183 5% 5% 5% — ft Intutt 

J 150121% aw 21% -ft GINYSV _ 3725 9 8ft 8ft -Vu Invcnre 

> 8805 5 PA 4% _ Greens M 17 6919ft 18 19% -ft InvTeO, 

> 444634% 31 M —aft GratlBd JO J 2ia» aft 23% > tnvBr 

_ 1100 5 d 5 -ft GreenStn > 1024 5ft 5 5Vfe — Vu imT? 

- 210 4W 3% 4 -Vo GrecnSwl >. 384 2 lft lft > lomet 

> S2» 11V4 low 10»fe+ "fe GmwAlr > 334 7 W 6ft 7 > towot 


- 16929 20 18% 19 


JOoio 10720% aw aw 


■aft Granfld 
-ft GreenStn 
-Ife GrecnSwl 
■ «fe GmwAlr 
GmdSu 

USM 

GristMU 
-ft Grosmn 


59018ft 17ft 18 
1068 12% 11% 12 


AstfCn.A 

AsdCmS 

Artec ^ 

AsJortoF 

AalraM 

Afitron 

Astros? 

Astrum 

AsrrtTch 




>14998 25% 23% HU- nfe FOMBc JO 627 141 a% 29ft Vft -ft GrdRnd 
.1 975722% 21% 21U— 1U F&MBn J8 23 77 73 21% 73% +% Gntwtr 

J 19310% 10% 10% » F&MDta - 2210 3ft 3ft 3afe -Vu Greurt 

- 7118 life IW lft —Ife FM Nat JOb 37 52716ft 16 16W +W GrpToCti 

_ 753.9% 2Vi, 2ft —'A FCBFn aB XI 119616 13 15 1 * > GroveB 

FCN8 .160 J 2932 29% 31% +W GrewBfZ 


JB J 212524 a% 23% > tnvBnk* 

> 1024 3% 5 5Vfe — Vu InvUTI 

>. 384 2 lft lft > Iomega 

> 334 7 W 6ft 7 > tawoNtf 

JO 16 9331% 30ft 31 M -Ife Iroauoi 

175 XI 56154. 151 1S2 —4 irwtnFki 

- 1 M 7% 7ft 7ft —ft tsco 

> 1363 9% 9 Wu -Ife IrtS 

>14099 3% 2ft 3% -ft boiyser 

> 810 B% 8% fl% > fsamdx 

_ 1074 12ft 12 12% —% ISrtLd 

> 13 9 1 .! 8ft BW —ft lltncBc 


_ 579110% 9% 10 


Ji U X241B 17% 17% — Vk MdXEr 

J6 U 59027% 36% 26ft -ft Mnca 
JOb ZJ 49 9% 8% 9W > Maxatfn 

- 2S2^* 

> 6010 a 18 18 >2 Mmdm 

> 1294 19 17% 18 —if. S 

- 5 13% 13% 13% —1 MaxwBl 

__ - 86918% 18% 18% > Si 


_ 1405 8V, 7i/, 7% +W HaYokd 1J21 J 37218 211 211 


1346 a 35% ~ 

398 9% 8% 

Vb Ufe nfe 

% v* 

?Vu 2% 2Vfe 

> 106812ft lift 12 > LTOPrt . . > 3146 1% ft 1 _ I FHP —13MB29W 27ft 27ft —ft 

Z 1338% M 18% +1% ■«'»■* *12 3% 3% 3% t% FHPpfA Jle 12 63372m MWWMfe-Vu 

Z 1208M MUM +1 CropGrw > 1079 18ft 17W 17% — ft HJR > 1084 13ft 12%12% — % 

Z 1092 3 v% —ft CmsCfem >1711411 9% 10ft -ftlFMProo _ *341 aw. rm. mfe — uv. 

> 738 1% fft m *« oss?" - ?3 8J S2 4 SS 

— 913 12% 12% > OrumAn _ 158 7% TV* 7% 

- M 13Vi 12 13% +1% CwUMi > 4617% 16ft 17ft -ft f FMBKO > 159 6% 5ft 6% -% 

Jlo J 271 92% 90 90 —1% CrwnRs _ 793 5% 5ft 5% tft ffAMed „ 1633)3% 12W 13W+1 

7« Tit ut 4H. -u Crveneo > 166 5 4% 5 r% I FRPPr _ 617% 17% 17% -W 

_ 1219 8% 8% 8% 

_ 4B0B 4 3% 3ft 

J8 17 1113 33% 37ft 32% — ft 


JB XI 119616 15 15% > Graves JO 2J 778 24V. a aw— lft itrem 

_,™«, .16# J5 3937 29% 31% -U GrewBiZ _ IdOSllWlOftll —ft IwertU 

> 105* 25% aw 24% -W FDP > 453 6ft 5% 6ft -ft Grvpnpn > 380 Mft 13ft 13ft —Vk 

— 1346 a 35% 35ft— IW FFBCP J6b4J 40014ft 13% 13% —ft GUMS. 2431 18% 17 17ft -ft I — 

— 398 9% 8% 8U JO 27 114ft 14% 14% -U GUtfrrtP _ 1955 3% 2ft 2ft —% I 

FFLCBc 74 IJ S3 16 15 15 — % GutfSou -. 97932% M 31% -1% 

FFVAFti _ 262 19% 19 19% — % Gtfrnrt: _ 7616% 16 16 -U JSJSn 

FFYFn JO 2J 2442 19ft 18% 19W +% GurtQ > 295211% 10ft lOft-Afe JBftst 

>1260829% 27% 27% —ft Gwinets JO X2 11B79 27% 77% > JGInd 

3 6332 27ft 2aRfe261fe— Vu GmttntS -2DSH33 30 X —1% JLG 


_ _ 767 7% oft 6% +% 

JO > 7612 11% 11% — U CntaHe 

~ 433 «% SVk 5% — "Zb Cngved 

— 1*4 5% &% 5ft -ft CuiMFr 

_ .723 2% 2V, 2% > Cutak . 

_ 1039 3ft lbfe 2 - CUpNBk 

Me U x60 27% a 27% +% QirTdi 

- 95 ft >Vu >Vu - ClUtCh 

32 X9 96H% 23ft 24% +W CybrOot. 

.95 9j 53S1W a a — U cyberenic 

.150 1.1 49 14 13% 14 -ft CygneO 


11411 9% 10% T% FMFrpp _ 2*61 3ft 7ft 3%. — Vfe I 

272 7W 6ft 6% _ I FMSFn _ 1774 23 W -ft I 

1S8 7ft TVu 7ft tW FNBNC 72 X9 5 a 23VJ 24% + 1 

46 77% 16ft 17ft -ft I FNBRo > 15b 6Vi 5ft 6% -ft HA-LO 

FPAMed > 1633)3% 12W 13W-1 HBOs 
617ft 17% 17% -ft HCCIna 
_ 2689 9% 8% Bft —% KOVest 
— 5750ra% an an — % tovswib 
_ 6339 351* aw Mft— lft HETMn 
> 9H 8Vu 7ft 8%, _ HFFnc 


FRPPr 
FSFFin 
% I FSl Int 
-ft 1 FTP Sft 


.10 IJ 2556 10W 8% 9% -% FOrtftr > 986 BVu 7ft 9to >| HFFnc 

■10r 1.1 *35 9ft 9ft 9ft —ft 1 FahnVIn .15 27 a 7ft 4Sfe 6ft +*Ku HJMG Wd 


3110 4ft 3ft 4ft — ft|FoOGrp 
942 HU 19% Wfe -Ife 


- 816 4ft 4% 4% —Ife HMN Fn 
.14 J 1S3041 39% 40 > HPSC 


>20S77a a X —1% JLG 
JMCGP 

H 1 jsBF n 

7 4W 5% 4W -ft JdOtHwT 

.16 J17817 34% 31 33% -2ft JOCOBSC -SMB 7U 7% + ft Mm&bc 

_ 59420% 19% 19% > Jocbsn JO II WH 12% 13 +% Medarxa. — u 

_ 178 3ft 3 3% — JoaxCwt — 1064 7ft 6 7% -1W Me (tax .16 1.1 1263 15W 13ft IS -lit 

> 10 Vn Vb V„ > JaaOfOn — 468 I4W 13%13<Vu **» MedSv* J6 37 683 1&% 14% 15 

> 1036 5W 4% 5 _ Jamesnil, JOe *7 170 8% 7% Bft" -ft MedfeSit 16M M? TV, in 

M 23 *76 27% 26% 26%-IW Jasmine > 255 2% 7ft 2% _ iv£dS5S “ ” —■ *-* 

_ 1065 6ft 5% 6 —V„ Jasons 


> 5506 a% 22 22ft -ft MayftGfP 

- 5186 6% 5 1 * 6U *16 mSEoI 
MOVSJ 

■ I McAfee 

— = 1 McOn 

NtaCar 

- 2® «* - McFgrt 

_ 333 Sft «w 4% —Vi McGrtn 

-- 77 1ft l’fe 1% > MdktaRn 

a 3t3 fiBsa 

JO Wxtrasa 

Z I8IDW 9 “ low tu SSmT 

jo fl ^ 1 ? {ft JJSSfud 


_ MO lift, low 10 ft -% 

- 8 > 7% SVi — ft 

- A ’ 4 .*% *iu 

Z l* 5 w \f* Tw 

J9t 7J 137 7% 7 7 -ft 

- *1211 9% 11 -lft 

- 410% 9% 10% -1 

> 10011 % 10 ft lift > 

- 1 7 5W 4ft SW *ft 

- „ 6 % 6 % _ 

_ 700817 14% I 6 U -% 

> 1912 11 11 _ 

J 8 X4 4278 a 19% 19% — % 

, - 170 8 % 7% 7% — W 

M M w -w 

- 2009 3% 3ft 3% Vi 

~ 115 1% 1% lft Z 

- JS fS SJ? 1 * * % 

_ 538 6 % 5% 6 

> 744 2ft 2 TVu -ife 

> 6342 38% 37 % J 8 -ft 

- fill Mft I3W 13ft -ft 

> 1»8 4W 3 % 3% — % 

_ 320 lft 1% 1% —Ife 

.16 1.1 1263 IS 1 /, 13W 15 -IW 


_ 111311% 10ft 10ft —ft vUayJac 

> 1653 4 3% 4 +%|Jeanm 


_ TO 7% 7ft 7ft — ft raftTFn M 13 S3 17% 16ft 17 +ft HUBCO JO 29 96532 20% 21 — 1 


646 5% 3% Sft +1W FwrCm 
12V* 12ft — w I FaknPr 


-I21S5T, 5ft 5% > HUBCO pf J4e2J 53 22ft B « —% -joJWd- 

J6 J 326 lift 10% 10% — % I Hactis .16 17 67 14% I3W 13ft —ft I JefBrti 


> 253 7ft 3W 21k _ MedCiW 

> 149 9% 8% 8% — w mSaci 

- « ift iw -% Smw 

— 3150 8ft 7 Bft tdfe Mdorwt 

■» .* g135, 23% 34% -U NftSv 

> 3S14W 13ft 13% —% MedDkxi 

J8 3J 288 19ft 19 19% —ft MedGr^ 


- 563627 23% 25 -1% 

- 701 lft IW 1 >Vm -V m 

> 351 9% 6% 9 _ 

> 879 2 l»u UVu — Vu 

> 348 2ft 7 2% Z 

- 96 3% 34fe 3ft -Ife 

- 204 6 % 5% 5% -% 


For invGstiTMjnf 
nifoiiiiulion 
Rood 

Hie MONEY REPORT 
Saturday 
inlhsIHT 


/ * 


LJ* \£f> 


















d+Ji 


INTERNATIONAL IIERAI.D TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


fSS 

a,,1 ^Un e 

eccc. s 
^umoh. 

?i ! >. a Ees- 


ngineers Miami Victory, 
10 Points in Final 4 Minutes 


:ead 


w.-nj. 

03 

it! 

li'i; cfr 


to 

ills. 


^Ssnc. 

i. 

i-. 

-viTjprf 
■ 11 ^.rr 

*'ta:u: 


•_•? r._^. w 


■*?*nJ:ac: 

.. * % 1 a. . 

11 


% . 
■ 1 „. 


The Associated Press 

:; ^The game seemed out of reach, but Dan 
K- *“»? «“»»» awfully longrodL 

■ . Marino bounced bade fmm * , 

V. m. “P aj^ctory for the ColtsSta £ 
^ 4 Mari ?° P 388 and returned it 

^3^^ < ?Jt t0 ^ ch ^ 5Wn for a 21-12 lead 
wo 7.32 left. As Buchanan raced nn 

* the sideline, Marino stood 

his hands on his W 
to WOrk ’ orchestra^ 
tte^mtoir t h-< I ua r te r comeback victory 
. % ca ms career. J 

Tf* ly . m ?o Ved 83 y^ds and 

? Manno s 28-yard pass to O J. 

r^ 1 ?. 3:52 ¥*■ makm 8 the score 

A a-iy.ine Colts ran three plays and had to 
• Manno took over at the Miami 42 

• ■■?*“ ?:06 left and completed five consecn- 

r bve passes. Irving Spikes’s 6-yard run ad- 
vanced the ball to the 17, and following an 
intentional incompletion, Stoyanovich 
kicked the winner. 

Indianapolis .quarterback Don Maj- 
kowdd bruised and sprained his right 
thumb and was replaced late in the second 
quarter by Jim Harbaugh. 

-49cts 37* Redskins 22: In Washington, 
Pexter Carter returned a kickoff 96 yards 


for a touchdown and Tim McDonald 
scored on a 73-yard interception retain to 
give San Francisco two big plays on their 
way to defeating Washington. 

Steve Young hit Brent Jones for a 69- 
yard scone and ran for a 1-yard touch- 
down. Jerry Rice extended his career 

NFL FOOTBALL 

touchdown record to 132 with a 28-yard 
reverse and also had a 55-yard catch that 
set up Young's short score. 

Young finished the day 1 5-of-25 for 291 
yards and one touchdown. Rice caught 
three passes for 90 yards, and Ricky Watt- 
ers caught six passes for 66 yards. 

VDdnq^ 21 , Sants 20: In Minneapolis, 
Warren Moon saved Minnesota again, 
throwing the winning touchdown to Qadry 
Ismail with five seconds left to beat New 
Orleans. Moon moved Minnesota 84 yards 
in 13 plays after the Saints had i»km the 
lead on two field goals by Morten Ander- 
sen. 

Moon was 8-for-12 for 86 yards on the 
go-ahead drive, including a 4-yard, fourth- 
down completion to Amp Lee at the New 
Orleans 27. Four plays later, he found 
Ismail in the left flat. Dodging defenders, 
Ismail went in for the score. 

Bears 20, Buccaneers 6: In Tampa, Flor- 
ida, Steve Walsh remained unbeaten as a 
starter, throwing for 205 yards and two 
touchdowns as Chicago snapped a two- 
game losing streak. 


Rookie Trent Dilfer made his second 
pro Stan for Tampa Bay, but the Bears 
sacked the first-round pick twice and 
forced him to hurry several throws during 
a 13-for-25 p erfo r mance. Dilfer finished 
with 159 yards passing and scrambled for 
15 yards to set up one of Tampa Bay’s two 
field goals. 

Walsh, meanwhile, threw second-half 
TD passes of one yard to Keith Jennings 
and four yards to Robert Green to break 
open a close game. 

Falcons 10, Chargers 9: Jeff George 
threw a first-quarter touchdown pass and 
Atlanta hdd visiting San Diego to three 
John Carney field goals, as tire Chargers 
failed to score a TD for the second time in 
their last three games. 

Carney extended his field goal streak to 
21 , but missed a 47-yarder that sailed wide 
right with 8:01 left in the game. The Fal- 
cons then hdd off the Chargers. 

Packets 38, Lions 30: In Milwaukee, 
Green Bay’s top-rated defense stuffed Bar- 
ry Sanders, knocked out Scott Mitchell 
and finally held off Detroit The Packers 
took a 24-point lead into the fourth quar- 
ter, yet wound up winning only 38-30 when 
Dave Krieg’s fourth-down pass was bro- 
ken up in the end zone with 42 seconds left 

Kricg, taking over after Mitchell broke a 
bone in his right hand in the second quar- 
ter, led the Lions on late touchdown drives 
of 72 and 58 yards, both of them capped by 
two-point conversions. The Lions said 
Mitchell would be out indefinitely. 


No. 2 Penn State Struggles Past Indiana, as No. 1 Nebraska Routs Kansas 


j 


The Associated Press 

Last week, Penn State lost in 
the rankings despite a big vic- 
tory. This week, the No. 2 Nit- 
taay lions must wait to see 
whether a ragged victory will 
cost them. 

Even with Ki-Jana Carter 
rushing for 192 yards and Kerry 

COIXEGE FOOTBALL 

Collins passing for 213, Perm 
State had trouble putting away 
Indiana, 35-29, on Saturday in 
Bloomington. Indiana. 

Chris Dittoe threw two touch- 
down passes in the last two min- 
utes for Indiana, including a 40- 
ytrd desperation pass on the 
final play. The six-point victory 


margin was the smallest of the 
season for Penn State. 

A week ago, the Nittany li- 
tres fefl from No. 1 even after 
overwhelming then-No. 21 
Ohio State, 63-14. Penn State, 
however, managed to hold cm to 
the top ranking in the CNN- 
USA Today coaches’ poD. 

Na 1 Nebraska 45, Kansas 
17: In Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Brook Beninger passed for 267 
yards and two touchdowns and 
Lawrence Phillips ran far 153 
yards as the Comhuskers sub- 
dued the Jayhawks. 

No. 3 Alton 38, East Confi- 
rm 21: In Auburn. Alabama, 
Frank Sanders caught six 
passes for 173 yards and two 
touchdowns as the Tigers won 


their 20th straight game. Au- 
burn extended the nation's 
longest winning streak. 

Na4 Florida 55, Southern 
Mississippi 17: In Gainesville, 
Florida, third-string quarter- 
back Eric Kresser threw an 87- 
yard touchdown pass to fresh- 
man Rridel Anthony on his 
first play, highlighting Florida's 
easy rectory. 

No. 5 Mbum 27, No. 10 Syra- 
cuse 6: In Syracuse, New York. 
James Stewart ran for two TDs 
and 100 yards as Miami over- 
came a 6-0 halftime deficit, scor- 
ing cm all four of their posses- 
sions in the second half. 

Na 6 Alabama 35, LSU 17: 
In Baton Rouge, Lousiana, Jay 
Barker became Alabama's ca- 


reer passing leader and Sher- 
man Williams scored two 
touchdowns. The Crimson Tide 
also scored on a Nocked punt 
and a fumble return. 

No. 7 Colorado 17, Oklahoma 
State 3: In Boulder, Colorado. 
Rashaan Salaam ran for 174 
yards as Colorado came back 
from last week’s loss to Nebras- 
ka. Korddl Stewart ran for one 
touchdown and passed for an- 
other for the Buffaloes. 

No.8 Florida State 41, Geor- 
gia Tech 10: In Atlanta. Danny 
Kan ell threw two short touch- 
down passes to Melvin Pearsall 
and Warrick Dunn scored on a 
63-yard run. 

Na 11 Texas A&M 34, Tex- 


as 10: In Austin, Brandon 
Mitchell returned a fumble 48 
yards for a touchdown and vis- 
iting Texas A&M pulled away. 

Rodney Thomas scored two 
touchdowns and Leeland 
Me Elroy had a short scoring 
run and an 83-yard kick return 
for the Aggies. 

Stanford 46, No. 12 Washing- 
ton 28: Anthony Bookman ran 
for 119 yards and two touch- 
downs as Stanford, playing at 
home, ended a 10-game losing 
streak against Washington. Na- 
poleon Kaufman ran for 139 
yards and two scores for Wash- 
ington. But he also had two 
fumbles that Stanford turned 
into touchdowns. 


Na 14 Colorado State 35, 
Wyoming 24: In Colorado 
Springs, a fake punt and Anth- 
oney Hill’s two touchdown 
passes helped Colorado State 
rally from a 24-7 third-quarter 
deficit and keep its conference 
title hopes alive. 

No. 15 Kansas State 38, Iowa 
State 20: In Manhattan, Kan- 
sas, Chad May threw four touch- 
down passes and Kansas State 
won in Iowa State’s first game 
since the team’s coach, Jim Wal- 
den, announced he would leave 
at the end of the season. 

Na 18 Arizona 13, California 
6: In Tucson, Arizona. Mike 
Scurlock returned an intercep- 
tion 97 yards in the first quarter 


Page 15 



KnaMro Nogi/Agence France Prone 

Bock Williams swatting the ball away from two Clippers on Sunday in Yokohama, Japan. 


and Jim Hoffman made consec- 
utive sacks to stop a late threat 
as Arizona stayed in the race for 
the Rose Bowl 

Na 20 Michigan 45, Ptardne 
23: In West Lafayette, Indiana, 
Tyrone Wheatley ran for 148 
yards and moved into second 
place on Michigan’s career 
rushing list, increasing his total 
to 3.916 yards. 

No. 21 Oregon 34, Arizona 
State 10: In Eugene, Oregon, 
Danny O'Neil threw three TD 
passes in the third quarter as 
Oregon took co mman d of the 
race for the Rose Bowl 

Oregon can reach its first 
Rose Bowl in 37 years if it wins 
its last two games. 


DrexlerUfts 
The Blazers 
In Japan 

The Associated Pros 

Clyde Drexler has started his 
12th National Basketball Asso- 
ciation season like be has some- 
thing to prove. 

After scoring 26 theprevious 
night against the Clippers, 
Drexler scored 41 points — 1 1 
in the third quarter — on Sun- 

NBAHHMiGHTS 

day in Portland’s 1 12-95 victory 
in Yokohama, Japan. 

Dreader was 16-of-Zl from 
the field, including 4-of-4 from 
3-point range. He also made all 
five of his foul shots. 

The Blazers broke the game 
open with a 13-0 run for an 80- 
55 lead six minutes into the 
third quarter and outscored Los 
Angeles 37-19 in the period. 

Bucks 97, Lakers 96: In Mil- 
waukee, M/my Coni on's two 
free throws with 11.8 seconds 
left lifted the Bucks over Los 
Angeles as Milwaukee celebrat- 
ed Gleam Robinson’s debuL 

Consecutive steals and fast- 
break baskets by the Bocks’ Lee 
Mayberry and Jon Barry tied it 
at 94 with 1 :43 remaining. 

Robinson played parts of the 
second and third quarters and 
scored eight points after signing 
a fully guaranteed 10-year, 
$68.15 m»1i on deal just before 
tipoff. 

Mavericks 112, Nets 103: Ja- 
son Kidd was one rebound shy 
of a triple double and Jim Jack- 
sen tied a career high with 37 
points as Dallas beat visitin g 
New Jersey. 

Kidd, the rookie who signed 
for $54 nriQion, dished out 11 
assists, scored 10 points and 
grabbed nine rebounds. 

BuBets 100, BoDs 99: Rex 
Chapman, whose last-second 
20-footer gave Washington an 
opening upset of Orlando, fol- 
lowed up by scoring seven of his 
26 points in overtime to beat 
the Bulls in Chicago. 

The Bullets had been 0-15 
against the Bulls since last beat- 
ing them Nov. 3, 1990. Tom 
Gugliotta added 19 points for 
Washington, playing without 
unsigned top draft choice 
Juwan Howard. 


’t*!W 

Ik-lit 

»>! I JX* 





NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Consolidated trading tor week 

ended Friday. Nov. 4 

{Continued) 


State 


Dtv YU ICteHtaU Lam Che Owe 


State 


ffflS 


-28 U 


MVCB«* 1-70 11-5 

Vicar — 

NKUA .16 7.1 


Safes 

Dor YU WO sHtti Law Ota Ota 
!10» 9W » — % 

... 115 uis tow im 

- iiw a* 5 » — % 

._ 420950 20 gJA »% ‘ft 

— 18129 S5U SI Vi S0ft-3ft 

_ 115015% 14% IS + V» 

1054 7** SVu 7% *1*6 
JBe _ 1«M I4W IMS l»-% 
_ 2732 Mb 7 TW ‘ft 
_ 12 37k 3* 3% — % 

_ 3sn in/* n* —vs 
SIM 114 114 _ 

friZui is W* — ft 
jSAa M 4>j -f* 
mi in tr* ira * 3 * 

190312% to U%+2> 
WJtFA 9» — Vh 

MISVb MU Mi 
43 2V. 2V. 2H -1* 
43 2» 2'A — Vi| 




SSKtar, 






_ 3334 UK W» im +1 
_ 38 lit 144 1}4 *Vi 

_ 91 434 44h 4Vi —'A 

M U» W3BZ1V, 19V. W* — V. 

_ 819715V. 14 MW *V4 

_ 342 25% 25 25 _ 

M 7.4 3923% 22 7TA _ 

_ 2i* rv* r/x m 

_ El 9*. FA *Jfc 

47X5 tV, 4% 

lit - .3117 2W 1W J* — 

. ' 418821% 21% 21% 

„ 41.4% 6 4% 

_ 1272 7 5% 4% _ 

95513% 12% 1TO» -J/u 

XS 1S31V, 30% 31% *1 

* 1*4 *5 248731% 29 31%*1% 

D 14 34 14 12% 12% 

' _ 79611% 10% 11 _ 

V .. 34 18% 18 WJ 

JE H 

•_ 3452 12% 11% V% — 

• - 2440 *% 4% S -J 

. 

*8 2* 12334% 24V. 24% *% 

_ 344 8% 7% 7*i — % 

iao 33 

” iS!Sf 

, = sass. ? & -a 

1JD13 715 30% 29% 30% _ 

' _ 375 5% 5% 5% *% 

•" « 

I ,0 94 »fc Vh m *v2 

?0 % % % - 

17797844% OT 43%— 2% 




»% 


1320 3 

_2T543 22% 19% 

_ 1043 95i a . 

„ 151 1C 9% Vft — ^ 
S33 4% 4% 6% — Vi 

_ 43728 14% 14% MW 
„ 3122 JYl 6 6% — w, 

_ 1117179% 25% V , — 1 
” 547211% 10% 11% +V. 

_ 146310% niVSr «H* — % 


I £&**£*.% 

3 237S 4% 4% « -% 


mi: 

□XMCTB 

fiSriiij 

SSp L7J SJ 3m 33 311i S1% 

~ ” l 5 ..2339031% 79V, 30% —% 

“ 80 14% IS 

40011% 11 11 - 

_ 49512% 12 taw — % 

32201 83 71% 74%—*% 

_ 1431 lata 13% 12% +W 



„ 400 5% 4% 4% 

Z1U5334& £f& Bit — !% 
_ 372521 18% 19% —1% 

_ 40 3% 3 3% *% 

- 8M28V. 27% 28% +% 
_ 1447 13% 12*V„ 13 — Vl 

pdikivbi „ «c 3* 3% 3% _ 

PrlCVFnS _ 22223% 21V, 21% —1% 

Portaw *4 4J 7815 M% 14% — % 
Portex _ 24011 9 9 -1% 

PortHkl JO* 1JJ 905*71% 20% 21 *% 

fwtll „ 479 9V. 8% 9% +% 

Pottlnfls 4704 20% 18% 19% +1% 

PotErn _ 154 7% 7% 7% — % 

PHorrS _ 2749 4 3% 3% — % 

PouSon _ *5514 13V. 13% _ 

PnVtiMX *4 U1 4157 3% 34 V. 3f%— 1* 

Pc90> 122 0% 7% » — % 

PeOkTdl _ 89415% 14 1£4 *% 

Pedtatric _ 204413% 12% 13% *% 

PeerRv _ 449 2% 2% 2Wn— ^ 

rgsgz =»aSSJ -« 

PenTrt _ Q1W 15% 15% — ' 

PemVo 1JBOSJ 111 35 33 34 —1 

PMfic J34 2* 21 14% 14% 14% — % 

PMnPfed _ 203011% 10% 10% — % 

Pcnrfl me J 517 3% 3 S — % 

SSS, r " “ 

PSOPBCB *4 12 138 20 19% 20 _ 

Pa&OHs JO 2_5 7 25% Z3% 23% +% 

PKJPCT £6 4J 333113% 12V. 13% +% 

PMPCTpt43S S4 9180 74% 78 +1% 

PtoOPBk ASbU IB 22% 22 22 — % 

PeoBfcIN M XI 49 22 21 2<% +% 

PBapCbc _ 152120% T9% l«fc— 1% 

PeopHrT *0 2**5648 14% 13% 14% -% 
P^g« ,94b 2* 

PeoSwRi Jtt i2 14917% 17 17. 


es< 

nu n O qi 

PerWdw 

Pwnoo 


PeSCOAn 

Petrt-no 


PwrOv 

prrtGoos 

P1HOOIA 

PWH» 

PUnmt 

ssar 

PtWIfUVttt 

PhormAB 

PtvmMa 

Ptowos 

PharLb 

PhflCon 

PhHEnv 

PtwwTc 

PhotaC 


4% 4% — % 

„ 21021 45% 59% 

.1519812% in’* 

_ 10134 22% 19 21 *1% 

_ 343315% 11 12%— 2U 

_ 517 3% 2% 3% *% 

_ 453 11% 10% 11% ♦% 

_ 19412% 13% 12% ♦» 

_ 21499 13% 12% 12%—;%, 
_ 125313% 11% 13 +1% 
_ 1943 n M M — ’ % 
_ 909 17% 17 17 - 

_ 3178 Mb ,8% Jtt +9% 
_ 601 lift 11 11% *% 


_ Itaii TVu IWu 

.jnujWii 22% - 



Stote 


Soles 

(Xv YW nasrt^t Low Q» C>se Sooo 


Safes 

5v »a Sb HSon Low Qsa Cnee . 


gs? 

PrapnTl 

ProaGp 

ProtedO 

ProfDB 

Pruleor 

ProfSy 

Prvwcr 


1* 106622% 21% 22 


Soes 

Div YW 100s Mam Low Qse Owe 


„ . ... _ 5921 71. 6% 7% - 1b 

_ ^ f* 7 V. *’4 RocnCS .10« * 3SOt\tr% 17% 17%— 1% 

- 1728 18% 14% 17% *2% ■ HcnCS at 1J5 SJ 26331% 30% 30% — 1% 

- — I ROCkflfflf _ _ 1148 15% 14% 15% - % 

- 7»b ■% -% RocfcPln 1*0 *3 1043 43 4? _ 

- 7222 4% 5% 4% -V, ■ RodtTen JO 18 *270 17% 14% ’4% — % 


SACVty 


Pro-to 1J0 3J> *53 34% 33V. 33% _;RsvBFp» 
PrrfwS *8 10 *274% 24 24% — % • Rcpck 

Proven _ 72 3% tab 3% * V» : Racer __ 


Pnsdmi 
Pnnfma 
Psicn cm 


PutaUtF 


PivcTcB 

S55SS 

PuroMl 


_ 3158 17% 15V. 16% — 1% RKMOl 
- ®£S Z. 6 4 ’- — ^ ■ RockvSTi 

_ TO 9% 8% 8% — ^ 1 I RoeCand . . 

-IP 1* 2|_7% 7 7% *% RsvtlFn* *4 28 7255 14 

- ~ - 125 S8 *34542 

_ 131510 

_ 5434 4V. 4 ' 3% -1 " . viRoseSJ 
_ 71 101 34% 30 33 -2 IvfcoseB 

_ 1» 9% 8% 8% — % ) RossSJr 20 

58 782 15 14% UK, — % RaaSv 

2 J £20% 20 20% -% Rowell 

o a 14% 14 14 — % RotaRfr *0 2* 

_ 2539 59b S* 5% *% _ 

_ 7133 5% SV. 5% — 

— 13311 15% 13% 14% ♦% 

-510X3726% 2SVx 25% — % 

U 1615 24% 24% 24% — % 


Puna _ 123 4 3% 3% — % ; RovOTC 

PutnTr *8 18 37 27% 3 3 „ I RuWtfW 


PyrniT 

PVbfe* 


_ 1412% 12 12 

_ 843 10% 8% 9% — % 

_ 371331% 30% 31% .1% 

lsVj . y, 

57% 42 -2 

_ 1315 10% 10 10 — -Vi 

8 1888 25 23% 23% — 1 

_ 3415 % Vu *u — V r 

1* 7430 14^. ulk life 
- 5211 4% 3?i 4% *%, 
_ 4217 34 24% 24 *% 

L4 2825 23 23 —1, 
_ 86 4% 6 4 — % 

_ AB 38 2412 1* 17% 17% — % 

Rouse Pt 135 6.7 1940 49% 48% 40%— 1 
RvSPA .58173 35 8% B 8 

RPYlGrtO _ 227 7% 4% 7 * % 

_ 1757 7% 41b 7 *%, 

_ 22416% 15 15% — % 

% | RxraOAr* _ 1021 71V. m 21 -1% 

- RyonBdc JOo 28 52 7% 7% 7% — % 

RytXiF _ 6641 7% 4% 69b *Vu 



_ 2333 12’.« 11% 11% — % 
_ 23790 205. 18% 19 — M.'„ 

_ 59912 11% 11% _ 

*8 ,3 2S JK = 
*o 


.16 2J 


iav. 12% 

28% — % 


— % 
% 


J!, 






Qukfei 


QuorumH 



RMUC _ 944 7 6% 

VMin . - 1773 9% 8% 


4% — % 


RonTC 

Rt*VS 

RomFinl 

Romsov 


PfercPW 

pnavtos 

Wh 


Reomen 


HonS»8 


311 4% 6 
K % Vh 
450 S t 

931 U II 

_ 2U 0% 6 


2 * 


. W, 3% - 

% “5 

9 

V* 

19k. — % 

.J0t1U .MS.fb M 

IW 5 5% 5% —Ik 

v^asL^aKS 

_ 12010% 9% «■ — 'f 

5447 uu. I* 16 *Vk 

Haa 34* is 21714 MV, 15% — % 
„ MU 9% 8% 9Vfc — W 

*— -MB -4j ' 33 52 m 49 —1% 

. » . _ -140 3% a% s»fc . ’{a 

575 15% Wk > «* — H 

78* U% U .Mg -5 

-.,■^73417% 14% l*«« 

> 153S4' {k“ 

• »* p SSji H 

'• Z SSnVi 48 M 48 -ate 

■;j40 ft* 17ft «% 9% «% -'■* 

m*. 4% 6 Vi r 

-% 



PWnsSF 

PfetnorSv 

WW . 

PuaSeft 

PWTE 

Puwsra 

PhaHms 

F%nun 

PfeMlS 

Polvmsd 

Rit n ennr 

Pencrtk 



PtftBKl 
POSRtSB 

sssa 

P05II6 

pom mw 

?&&. 
PlYCSJd 
PrteW 
PrmAnes 
Pmrtc 
PrmBn A 


4* ««?* Sf —** 

U1 ” gy* 7% 34.^6 

_ 2149 11% 10% 10% — % 
_ 135319% 18 18 — Jb 

_ 216014% 15 15% — % 

_ 4397 lVu 1%, IWi — Vu 
_ 110 3% 2% 3% t% 

_ 183 13% 13% Uf — Vk 
_ 219 5% 5% 5Jk ♦% 

ss PH :a 

z 

Z W3<% 33 33% — % 

_ 22729 25V, 22% 25% +2 
_ 363017% 14% 141k — % 
_ 4311% 11% 11% - 

_ 4071 4% Sib 6% — % 
_■ 3777 27 24% 35% ♦% 

t _ 99 5Vif 5Vb 5% - 

_147?S?0% 18% 20 *% 

*8 38 21824% 23 23 — % 

_ 512% MW 12% +%» 

*41 6 J 22 7% 4% 6 % - 

z_ 1444 10% m 10% +% 

80 28 534 27 22 34 *1 

_ 35819% 1B% 19% *-% 
84 17 1017% 17 17% *% 

_ 2148 16% 14% 15% - 

84 13 1444 50% 44% 50% *3% 
M 2.114412 34% 33 » — *'5» 

.12 8 ism 19% 17% «% ♦» 
Z 4424 9% 7% !% f. 

* 

■ =% 

_U0W 9% 4% 8 W— 1%4 
1.12 42 84 MW 25% 26% *1 
_ *11 10% 9% 10 - 

88 2J *257 21% 20% 21 -W 

171 “ II S ^ =s 

81 40 161 12% 1IK 12 

= 5ft A -S 

Z 41211% 14% 18% +t% . 


Ml 184 48x3047 16% 15% IS 1 * — % 

rpm** J* WHnSir% 18% 19% *% 

RSFm. 80 28 am 

_ 1087 3% 3% 39b *% 

_ 4068 2 194 19b 

. 2756 J* » I* * % 

„ 571610% 9V, 10% 

_ I9S 2% 2% 2% 

_ 812 20% 18 19 —1 I 

_ 242016% 14% 15 — % i StfTacfl 


SFXBrd 

SHL5V 


_ 405443% 43% 43 _ ! 

_ 2709 6% 4% 4% -%|SK 
_ 202514% 13% 13% — % ! SAT Be S 
" a « « *v,|Ojrics 

'Zt 

_ 33747' ^ — % ! SEicSo 

_ 2B7 13% 13% 13% *% 

_ 1«1 3% m 2% — % 

3 720 22V. 71% 21% — Yu 
4% 4 4 — 

14 IS 15% _ 

36% 3S% 38 Mi *19b 
2% 2% 2& *Yu 
24% 25% ZS9W — % 

5% 49b SVb *> 

MW 15% 16% — w 
12% 10% 12% *1 
3W 2% 3 *V* 

17% 14% 16% — % 

25V, 24% 25 - 

27% 24% 25 —2.. 

_ IVb 3 3% — % 

’416% 15% 16 — % 

_ 209 23 2D 20%— 2 


US 

SKF 

sw 

SLMS 

SPSS 

5TV 


.16 

a 


.10 


SaBytk 


SUude 

%252k. 

iSZwa* 

ScmLby 

SondTc 


_ 161010 9 9% — % 

80 38 88 20 % 20 20% — % 

-17*81 WB* 13% 13% *% 

_ 245 7% 7% 7% ♦% 

_ 1901 6Vi 5% 9l7u ♦»% 

. 5731 19 17% UpZ »% 

8 1045 21 20% 2D V, — % 

18 233217% 15% 15W— 1% 
_ 731 17% 14% 14% — % 

_ 8334 Shi 5% 5% — %, 

1.1 206 9% 7% 8% * % 

22e2J Z7 8% 8% 8Vb _ 

- 244 18% 17V» 17% — % 

.11 8 541 14% 12% 14% *1% 

_ 7257 4% 5% 5% — % 

_ 946515% 12% 13% ♦% 

- 41 5 4% 5 +% 

- 5872 ft'* 7% 7% —Vi 

1S4 3.922643 50% 48% 49% — >7* 

_ 269 9% 8% B% — % 

_ 3591 14% 16 16% +% 

_ 3149 22% 28% 31 - 1% 

- 3987 32 18% 21 *1% 

_ 3394 9 7% «% — % 

_ 54517% 15% 15% —1% 

.12 13 83 9% 9 9%+% 

*0 1.1256303°% 36% & — % 

.16 13 x29713% 13% 13% *% 
JO IS 9394 21% miism/u— i*y 
_ 2898 » 20% » —1% 

_ 301 2% 2% 2% - 

- 1030 19V, 'Va 1V1* —Vi 

_ 148 2% 2% 2% *% 


SorteCp 


-20719715 13%13tVu— IV* 

- 5457 15% 13% 15% +% 

Z 2091 mv. ^“- JV - 

- 23948 20'* 18% 19% +1% 

z *58 life .? 1 % Vk 

_ ins 5 1 * 4% 5% +1 

_ 8769 5V, 4% 5% —Vi 

- 4433 16 12% 14% +2% 

- 546 lVu r lVn — Hi 

zfiasf 

_ 2177 7% 7% 7% ... 

.10e 8 7113% 12% 13% »% 

_ 2213 1% !% 1V H — Vu 

*Se 5J 3 8% BV, 8% — % 


J 14% 


SoxFm JO 18 300 
SordReo 


19% 19% +% Seetcmn 


- 3115 4% 4 


— % 


RahiSfi 
Raven 1 


KOVrna 



SSSae Z W*?y, l 9 % +W 


PrctvPOe 

PYBSRVS 

SSL* 


a 9 



5W 

PrcTRi 

Prt3ePt 

PrlmeS 

PWmtWi 

PtmBCP 

AmM 


•JTW 



^ 8% -Vi 

OTk-ww— » 

4%, 4*/< « Vi* 

s 4r..»5; ** i* 1 * — % 

4H203T4 JR, 31V, ■ ■* 


Rnwks 
RJworrt 
RUftn 
Rtne 

RichvS 
WcWood 
t. | RMbefl 

14818 31% £% »W-lS | 

. . isafV3f'i. 

rr'rr ^vri fig 9 R3 77 16 15M 1W 

SAHJgfcb 

• *tarr 8 *w 


10 > 5% +1» 

Li 7734 6% 5% 5% —W 
-2710641% 32 40 *1- 

Z 44007 Mil 15% M t % 

** 

z 1M 13% 12% U, 


zTiS^a 

*4 28 3818% 17H 17% —9b 

_ 7614 4% 2% 3 — > 

- 3985 2% 2% 2% — % 

*2 23 4419% 18% 18%— 1% 

- 4438 13% 12 13% +1% 

84 f 43 2097 20 18 IB Vi —2% 

J2 25 18412% 12% 12% *% 

_ 770 ZJ% 23% 23% -% 

-22204 18% 14% 17%—^% 

_ 35711% 11% 11% - 

_ 348220% 18% 19% +% 

- 2375 22 20 20% ♦% 

- 5148 6%» 5% 6V„ *% 

- 844 10% 9V, 9% — % 

_ 2134 17% 16 14% — % . ___ - 

RMtuwt LXtuts i m m 11 % - ! Saxsis 

Pg flAClrt — 41 7 M 6V — A 

Rev8=n I JO *0 6230 32 30 30 — 1% 

Z JSS* !?*!!*=% 

gags" =”i«a is % 

8® -““ffiaari:*); 

RwvCom — 200027 25% 25%— 1% 

ssssf 

Z sS i 2 % iofe 10 % +% I securtHa 

- 42615V, M% 15% +1 

W& J5 7 i jrwwdt 1 

SB5 - 188412% 12 12% +% 

SSrS Z 3«oio% 9% io% +% 

_ 3213 11% 12 ♦% 

unt fj S2ii% tip* n +% 

- 137521% 20 31% -1% 

; 3 ga St 15 

= SIIS ™ a 

I jm 4% 4% «k — % ! Sharpen 
Z JO 1% 1W 1% — % ; Snrwm 

- 3929 4% 4% 4% — %{gwj3p 

14 Z2 1397 8 7 VU — % 1 Sheftfl 

. « « +% SMtaB 

8 2260 MW 15W 15% — % »h 

- 3201 3% 2% 2% I Sta-M* 

Z 5847 9% 8% 9 
_ 77423% 21 21 —4 

„ 299 8% 3% 4 +% 

_ SSI 6 5% * 

_ 4352 Th. 1% l'Yu +V«:Swtlia 
_ 1861 13% 127k 13% *Jk 
* 2*0 34% 2S% 25% _!Snu*AsJ 

1* *134 33% 34 

- 

Z 4 7% 7% 7% — % SerSm 


SecndB 56 3.1 
SecSnpf 1JD IS 
See s cp 84 28 
SecConBc M 13 
SccCoo _ 


JB 18 
.121 38 


30 23 442 9Vi B% Wm *%, 
*8 3.1 *28816% IS 15% — 1" 
.10e L4 1545 8% 6% 7 —I 

- 526 7% 4% <Vi — . 

- 18477 26 2tP* 25 *1% 

_ 14249 11% 1D% 11 ♦%! 

_ 3041 3% 2% J»9u — Vu 
_ 84511% 10% 11% — % 

- 288211% 9W 10»b — 1 

- 1883 9% 7% 7% — % 

_ 919 3% 2Jb 3% — % 
_ 1452 *% 5% 6% + Vi 

_ 1139 25 23V, 23 V. — % 

_ 60 2D Vi 20 V, 20V, - 

JO 8x1792 23V, 22 22%— 1% 

- 675348% 45 47% *l«b 

_ 200717% 15% 17% »1% 

JO 1.1 350629 28% 28% — % 

J4 IJ *83 20 19% 19% — W 

_ 7040 4% 6 6M +% 
_ 22 12 llVi IIW —V* 

_ 4976 49% 43% 47% 4-2% 
_ 1797 <M 4V> Ml - 
JO 18 61313% II 13Y%f2Vb 
-23154 48% 44W 47V, —Vi 
_ 7383 7% 6% 6% — <A 

- 54 2% 2% 2% +% 
82 2* 592923% 20% 21W— IM 

- 5244 SW 4% 4% +% 

M 1A 10511% IIW 11% -% 

_ 10053 15% 15 ISA, — Vu 
.ioe i2 4292 evJ 4% 6% »m 
*8 2* 9319% law law — w 

- 31322 21V, 21% — V* 

IJO 3* 15934% 35 35 — W 

- 74953 27 «%a%+l>* 
*6 17 163 17% 16% 17 -W 

_ 72418% 16% 18% * lb 

- 2786 2 1% 1% — VS» 

- 251 M% 15% 16 +% 

J6 1* 11 10% 9V, 9% — V, 


, - 3203 14% 13W 12% - 

5 cnoeoP *4 28 4946 23 'm 73 22 —V, 

Soooe5>e4 2J5 48 327 49% 4^4 494b —Vb 
SoeMoBC _ 221 11% 10% 10% — % 

SoundA _ 198 4M 5% 5% — % 

SMchG 80b «J *49 19 18% 18% 

SMTtr l*9eSJ Cl 20% 20 % 20% 
SoB e c - 1759 4% 5% 4 

SthoEnH - 2212 14% 13% 13% 

SoAWVi AS 5.7 169 I % Vb — % 
ShnoSv -54 4J 315 14 12% 13% —% 

Soumtrsl *6 38 8931 19% 18% 19 —Vi 

Souwol - 95 3% 2% 3 + % 

SwstBce JO 1* 17514% 14 14 

SwBoJl 1JO0 5.1 614 24% 23 23% +% 

SwfeNIt 1.12a 4j *15 27 25 24 

SwsfSee .14 2J CO 7% SH 4% 

SwiWrtT A u 31 9% 9 9 

Sweep .10b I.l 4543 9% BJb 9 - 

SpoceLb — 2509 22 20% 21% +W 

SpcxiAm .10 2* 57 5% 5 5% — % 

SwxtMot AS* J 2394 14% 15% 16 —1% 
SpecMu - 179 5% 4% 5 *% 

SecDv _ *58 18% 16% I4%—1% 

SpdEop _ 2816 10% 10% 10% - 

SpdPap _ 674 12V, UVb 11% 

Spetran - 4054 7 5% 6ft +1 

5pedra -14791 1% % IV* , _ 

issr z5s»«*a*ai 

_ 7444 14% 13 14% + 1 

— 123 6ft 5% 6% +Vk 

IJ 53412 15% 13ft 15ft +ft 


SwcTcn 




SeorfsTn 

iSSf 


SMRVWA 
SWF pt ijn 

^^15 A* 


SfottCm* 


BSR 

IRespim 

RetrCre 


Reen-hS* 

RedSvi 

RcxhaO 


J2i 


.10 


.» 

80 



1.12 45 

.io« Z 




20 

Sow x42 16ft 15ft MW -ft , SierTuc 
Praceat . - 2W **• £* £? * s~r~ _ im y 2718 17 I7V, — W i gomaC 

S i- is ^ 

s 1 ra ^ ”• « ■- sBnfGrf 


296 2ft The — W 
13132ft 31ft 31ft— 1% 

5227ft 24% 27ft * ft 
1720ft 19% 20ft +ft 
381 15% 1SW 15% +W 
139845ft 44% 45% +ft 
607 1% 1% 1% _ 

27 16ft 16 16 

7 4 4 4 

209 13 lift lift— IVt 
5427 1 P5, tan 

806 3 2ft 3 + V* 

37625ft 34% 25 — W 

22 4% 4W 4W _ 

- 4049 5% 5 5% +% 

-3176820ft 18H l*ft *ft 
_ 3963feu 3% » -*it 

- M4Sf 5ft 5ft - 

- 1753 9ft 6% 7 —2% 

- 457915ft 14 14% +% 

ASe J *554 17% 171%, 18W _ 

_ 3044 18ft 10 10 

_ 1544 5% 5 5% — «h 

84 ±9 <449 30% 29% Z9%— IV* 

- 1446 4% 3% 4% +% 

_ 993 8 7 7% +W 

_ 477312% 7ft 2V u 

_ 276513ft 10% 13% *2 Vi 

JO 33 7719W 18% law -ft 

- 743 7% 7% 7% _ 

_ aoiiift low ip% — % 

_ 2945 6% 4ft, 6% ♦% 

- 183122ft 21% 22 ‘ft 

84 38 3914ft 17 IS ‘W 

_ 626420ft 18ft 19 —1ft 

- 2388 8W 7% 8ft -ft 

215 7W 4% 7W ♦ % 

_ 2133 13ft 11% 1TO — % 

_ 500 3 2% 2% —ft, 

J882A *99222 30% 21 — % 
-1147127% 23% 25ft +1% 

- 483416ft 15ft 15% — % 

- 7510ft 10% 10% — W 
_ 294 3ft 3 3ft — % 

- 4244% 3% 3% —ft, 

Z WW9 7 6ft 6% — % I Sunaewr 

33 .9 885737 34% 36ft rl SunLso 

_ 1190 *ft 8W 8% - I SynrTe 

- 491 IV. IW. 11% — %■ 

_ 104 7ft 7% 7ft 


_ 14 2ft 2ft 2ft —ft 

- 29 4 3% 4 +% 

_ 361714 13 13 —ft 

- 1197 15% 14% ISA —ft 
_ 1043 Vu ’Vb ft *V* 

- 873 1% 1% 1ft 

_ S2S4 9% BW 9ft ‘1 
_ 80 2ft 2% 2% _ 

_ 7182 8% 8 8% +Vh 

-17813 4% 5% 4W — W 
_ 3819 1ft lft, lft ‘ft. 

Z D7? 3^ 3ft TV* 

_ 3700 9ft 94b 9% 

-. 486 4ft 4% 4ft ‘ft 
-159692S ZlViZMft, ‘ IVm 
3.9 341418% 17ft 17ft, — ft, 

- 1236 19ft 18W 19 _ 

- 291 10% 9% lO'.i -Vi 
8 7081 13% 1Mb 12% +1% 
_ 1505 1ft lft 1ft. 

- 544 % ft Vi 

- 730 ft V. lft. 

-27858 24 22 VI 22V U _ 

- 1199 % ft. % +V U 
_2SB7B38% 26% 28% ‘ft 
_ 292 7% 4% 7% 

- 881014ft 10 12ft +2 

' ” 51 14ft 13% 13% -ft 

„ 21819 1BU 18% —ft 

*4 11 4914ft 14% MW— IM 

- 73T? BW 6% 6ft. + TVu 
80 IJ 17374 33ft Kft 32ft — 1 W 

- 7007 14V, 12ft 13ft ♦% 

- 3671 7ft 6% 7ft tft 
AS 8 768513% 10% 13 

_ 900 12% 11% 11% 

_ 917018 16% 16%— 1% 

- 7151 2Bft 3M 27% ‘ft 
*0 2J 181 17ft 17% 17ft ‘ft 

_ 10U11W 10V. 10% “ 
7A 42 2SW 25 25% - 
J 10150 38% 37 37ft— 1 


2 if 


2 204724ft Z3% 24ft tft* 

- SI 19ft 12% 12% -ft 

- 844 Oft 9% 9ft —ft 

- 36710ft 9% 10 —ft 

- 758 2M4 20 20% +ft 

-2*392 61 55 58 +1% 

_ 1221 3ft 3ft 3% +ft 

- 482 3ft 3ft 3W + ft 

- 827 ft ft «Vu tft, 

1.10 5.1 246 22 21% 21% - 

_ 454 4ft. 4 4 

- 362214% 12% 14 +% 

-25668 5 3ft 4ft —ft 

A78 J 944835ft 33ft 33ft— 1% 

- .121 5ft 4% 4% 

_ 7671 ft % % «IL 

- 8449 6W 6 6 ft -3S 

JO 1A 8916ft 15ft 16ft ♦% 

_ 2402 7 6ft 6ft + ft 

Tk 28 28428% 24ft 27% —ft 

- 343 8 7ft Tft ‘ft 

_ 813 14% 13ft 13ft - 

JO X4 5(24 23% 23% _ 

Sumftapf 2 j 03 »J 10423% 21ft 21ft -ft 

SurrwncF _ 941022% 19% 22% +2% 

Summas — 81 6 5*4 5% _ 

Sumaon - 1590 9% 8ft 9 ‘ft 
SucnBWA .14 U 14711ft IIW IIW _ 
SumRB J4b3J 299021ft 20ft 21ft ‘ft 
SumlBTX 36 IJ SB 31 ft 71% 21% _ 

SurOOre - 1473 16% 15% 16% ,% 

ScxnBTc -2822031ft aft 28% — 1% 

SunBnep IAS 3J 230% 30% 30% —IV, 
Suninfl - 126334 3Rh 33 +3% 

SunMiC -66632 34% 32ft 32%— 1% 

StflSpI _ 350 4% 4ft 4ft ♦ ft 

Son TV A4 J 9445 9% 8% 8ft —Vi, 
Sunbelt _ 414 6% 6 4 —ft 

5uftav - 295 6% 6 6 

SunSvpl 130 9.1 123 13ft 13 13% +W 

SuncHme - 586 3ft 3ft 3H — ft 
SunGrd _ 154939ft 37% 37% -ft 

Suiotoss -naif 40»4i%-w 

SunBCA .151 88 104 2 1% - 

_ - 247 17% 17% 17% i ft 

- 511 5ft 5 3 —ft 

- 6171 3 2 2ft . % 

_ 643 lft. lft, 

_ 296 6ft tft 6% — % 


State 


Do Ytd roosMah LOW Che Chge 


,n — 

£ Vis 

16ft ‘ft 


Sunstal pf 3J5 >38 50 27% 27ft 27ft _ 

5*ip«ta _ 5TJ \4% >2% 13ft —ft 

SUpTea, - 895 7ft TVu 7ft l a 

Super «Ul - 1595 lift 10ft 10% _ 

Superw _ 159 12% 17 12% * ft 

Sopciex _. 37B0 6ft 5ft 5% +V„ 

SupSpcI _ 1405 3ft 7>, 21b 

Suptnfl _ 167 12 10 ft 10ft— lft 

SuneShwr _ 9479 2ft lft 2ft 

SutaL*r _ 1743 3ft 3%. 3ft —ft 

SuroTc _. 403 4ft 4ft 4ft — V„ 

SurvTc _ _ n 8% 7V. »ft * ft 

SusaBnc 1*8 47 171 23% 22% 23 —ft, 

SunR« - 253 Zdft »% 74 — % 

SWATS - 8148 45% 40 41M— «M 

Swpestd _ » vft 9 9ft 

Swish wf _ 3D1 ft. Yj, 

Swbher - MM 1 . 

SyQsJTC —10749 17ft 15% 16'. 

Sybase s -3997454 48% 4V%— 3 

Sytoron _ 210620M ig!A ibw— lft 

SYften - 878 11ft TOW lift ‘ft 

SvtvnLm _ 765 18 17 10 — W 

Svmntc -22928 18’i 1? 17ft— >V„ 

SYmbl _ 704 B 'A 7ft 7% _ 

Svmeblc - 4805 m. 11% 12V. ♦% 

SvtvWtv AD II 327 30ft 19ft 19ft— 1 

_ 127 2V» 1% 1W —ft 

- 709 8% BM (M ♦ U 

- 800 5ft «ft 5 _ 

- 9*99 5% 4ft. 4ft —ft 

_ 318 16% 15% 15% —'A 

- 6781 471i 44% 44ft— 3ft 

- 6308 6M 5ft 6M *% 

_ 1093 2ft 2% 2ft -rft 

.12 .9 6641 13M II 13 *W 

- 4533 Tft TVu 7M —ft 

- 26416 13 13ft— 1% 

_ 3705 30ft 19ft 20ft ‘ft 
_ 645410% 9ft 9ft — % 


State 


Sote 

Oh, YU lOOiHan Low Ose Ow State 


Safes 

Ore YW 1OQ5 Low Die Qfee 


JMe J 12717'.. lift lift — % ! Vaflcn 
_ 306 13ft 13ft 13ft _ . 

*0 28 154 l*ft 15ft 15Vi — % , VireGp 


2% | VfeioriSci 


Tr«mBc 
Tf*taa 

TriCoBn _ _ __ _ 

TrlcoPd - 447 66 59 66 __ _ 

Tricon* - 2289 17ft 14ft 14ft » IM I VISX 

Tricord - 9247 7ft 6M 6ft rft , VitolSon 

Truwiic _ 2B39 7V. 7ft 7V. • ft ' Vitmk 

Tran ark - 348 7ft 6ft TV, .Ml VitaSM 

Trimofe - 2347 14ft 13M 14% —ft I VnmS 

TrlmrtJ - 5491 4ft 3ft 3M .ft I Vmprb 

TruiziC - 2527 5 4M 4»b ‘ ft Vooinf 

Tron - 591 ,5V. 5ft 5M —ft VatvOS 

Triples - 354 12% 11% 12ft - 

Tripos - 130 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

Trjauktf - 1126 Mb Sli 6ft ‘ft 

Trbm - 251 ISM 13V, 13ft— IM 

TrisJar - 3556 5% 4ft S'- .1 

Trovtfifl A5a * 485 11ft 11% lift *ft 

TmckCm 3492 12% lift 11% — % 

TnrSJNJ J2 2JxX419 15 14 14ft —lb 

TTWMYs 180b 5* 1B8 20 19% 20 -M 

Trusta* *0 It B43 17ft 17 17 —1 

Tseng JO 2J 5661 7ft 6% 76ft ,M 


TATTeti 
TBC 
TCA 
TO Inf 
Tf 


TP Find 

Tils 

TJIntl 

TPt En 

TRFnc 

TOMCPr 

TROLrn 

Tames 


TandvBr 
TankJov 
Taolsfm 
Tapisf wt 
TargTcJ, 
TorgelT 


TteoPh 

Tntfinm 

TeamRn 

TchDors 

Tctmal 

Techne 

TecndM 

TocnmT* 

TecumB 

TKiimA 

ToeCmn 


Teknkm 

Tetao 

TeTuid 

TelCmA 

TetCmB 



J6 4A 


ttocSup 
T nfcAu 
Tmsfin 

TrnWlint 

Tron w 
TrmWsi 
TtnNlw 
Tmsmt 

A4 

TmReCp 
Tnent 
TmspAm 
TronsTxGs - 
Trwl5c m 4* 


■14 IJ 


TrwPrt 

Treadco 

[avUn 


_ 375 3% 7 Vi 3 —ft 

_ atCta 9M 9M 9>ft. 

*4 1.9 662 231 V„ 23 ft 23X'» — ru 
_ 250 4% 4 4ft —ft 

_ 4440 3ft 2% Tft —ft 
_ 8943 19% 17 TTW-aufe 

- 129111 10ft 10ft — 

-13363 12 7ft 8M— 3ft 
- 18194 */a % *ft, ‘Vu 

- 892 6 5M 5% ‘ft 
J2 IJ 271918% 17% 17% —ft 

_ 1226 4Vt. 3>Vu 4Vu - 
J7 18 5276 25 Vi 74»i 25ft— lft 

- 3714 5ft 4M 4ft —ft 
A5e * 2008 14V, T3M 13ft —ft 

_ 9042 5ft 3M 4% —ft 
_ 3002 T>A 6V, 6ft 
.12 I J Bn 8 7 7Ji —ft 

_ 222 4ft 4W 4ft _ 

_ MXa fift 7ft 8 ‘Vu 

- 148916 13 15% ‘3% 

- 1570 2ft 2V, 2ft. tft. 

_ 510 3M 3ft 3ft 

- B0 V u M ft 

- 2233 9 7% H — 1 

_ 3671 32 30ft 30ft— 1ft 

- 9X2 4ft Wu 4ft ‘ft 

- 2197 6M 4 SVu —ft, 

- 3233 12% lift 17ft ‘»b 

- 17711ft 11% 11M ‘% 

_ 6603 20 1906.19% ‘ft 

-56 5* 128 IIW 10ft 11% - 

- 658 11% 10ft 11% +W 

- 449 9 Tft 9 ‘lft 

- 748 7 6ft 6ft ‘M 
_ 157216ft 15ft 16ft ‘ft 
_ 992 6ft SV* fcft -ft 

JOqIJ 283 48 46 46>Vu‘W« 

AOoU 2252 48ft 47 47% —ft 

_ 937 2 1 Vu 2M 2% — Vu 

- 6876 M 20ft 25ft ‘3M 
_ 3001 11% 10M 10ft —ft 

- 3351 17ft 16M 16% —ft 

“I* J&2& 2M6 *S-2 V “ 

z stfavararzk 

- 1170 6ft 5% 5% -% 

- 205 4M 3% 3% — M 

- 2040 10% 9 ft 9ft —ft 
ill .1 424013ft 12ft >2% — Vu 

- 32511ft IBM 10M —% 
-1B36B46M 42% 42M— 3M 

U* M 17846 44% 46. +1% 

- 940 19% 18% 19% — W 

_ 1639 8ft 8 8 -V u 

J6elJ 7646 27ft 24ft 25ft -2% 
32 V 148 13 12 15 —Vi 

- 777 17% |0% 11% +% 

- 7809 19% 17% 19% ‘ft 

- 2510 3 VS 2% 3% — M 

_ 317 5% Pfu 5% _ 

- 22 12ft lift 12% +ft 

- 773 9 ■% 8% — M 

IJ 98 MW 15% 15ft ‘% 

- 27328% 27 28% ‘1% 
JB Ml 177529% 27% 28% — % 

-6140943% 39ft 39% — W 

- 3533 4 3<*u Wi, +Vu 

- 9261 17% 14% 15% - 

- 232 12ft 12% 12% — M 

- 144 5% 4Wu 5% ‘Yu 

- 1584 ft, IV- Wa _ 

A30 3 *62611 9ft 11 ‘% 

- 11477 20ft 16% 19% +2ft 

M IJ *23 6% 5ft 6% - 

- 15815ft 14% 15ft ‘% 
*0e J 17759% 58% 58M 

a TBA 7ft 6% fltft — *h 
392 Uft 133%. 13ft —Vi 
13137 a 35% —3% 

JB 4.9 7558 4 5ft 5>Vu —ft, 

- 616 8 6% 7ft — % 

_ 602 3% 3ft 3ft —ft 

- 134310ft 9W 9% ♦ W 

1 J7I11.1 41 17 16 14 

.16 U 935 8% BM Bft _ 
- 244711% 10 101b ‘ft 

-14347 15 14 14ft ‘% 

- 879 I 7% TV* +% 
- 44051l»u 9% 10 _ 

_ 857 26ft 25 25 — 1% 

31 17% 17ft 17ft —ft 
2M 14% 14 14 —ft 

185 3% 3 3% ‘ % 

290 12% 12% 19% - 

- II 14b IM IM 
_ 1464 1ft 1 T%» -Yu 

- 1399134b 12ft 13M ‘ft 

„ 463 4ft 4% 4ft —ft 

J 150019% 11% 11%— 1 
_ 341220% TS% 19% _ 

- B98 2X>w l<Vu 2V,, . Vu 
_ 9981 lift 11 lift _ 
75313% 13 13% ‘ft 

32 16 15% 15% .. 

1551 9 8M Bft ‘ft 
4» 2ft 2ft 2ft ‘V U 
*3 14ft 15% 16ft ‘ft 
883 13ft 13 13% .ft 


Tubscp 

TdekDr 

TmkM 

TUtCO 

Tuscan 

Tyson 


- 2912 6M 6'A 

- 761 6% 6 


6W 

6ft 


— 2*12 TVu 9% 6M — > 
JJ 57 IBM 17 17W -M 

* 792524 22ft 29M— IM 


U 


Viol 


.14 TD *416 Oft 8 a —ft 
.10 3 *44 15V. 14V. IJ** — 

_ 107 lft IM lft 

- 752 8 4M 8 -M 

- 4701 13 lift 12 —ft 

A2« J 120211 10ft 10ft -ft 

_ 545 14 lift lift— IM 

_ 6745 4ft 4M 4% —ft 
_ 603 13ft 13 13V. —Vi 

-10955 17ft 15ft lift. -Yu 
_ 374 27 25ft 24 Vi —ft 

- 728 19ft IBM 18ft— lft 
_ 9571 8ft 7% 7M - ft 


W 


WCTQn __ „ 5*93 4% 5M SXM —Yu 

WD-ffl 2*0 li 19543% 42ft 43ft _ 

WFSto .lOe J *351 15 14% 14% — Vi 

WLR/d JO IJ 2528 MVS 25ft 25 ft _ 

WPlGfP _ 652 3M 2». 3 ♦ Vi 

WPP Gp A4e 1.1 2T18TWU Th, 3VS — Vu 
WRTEn _ - 3D7B lOVy 9M 9M 


WRTpf 2J5 9* 5841 


WTD 

WVSRl 


23% 24 — 1 


WoinBk 



JO U *2578 38% 28% 36 ‘6% 

-80b 2J 147 32% 32 31 

-200 11 32V7 4M 6 6M *M 
1 AO 2* *25 35% 35% 35% —ft 

- 44 16ft 15% 16% ♦ W 

_ 3581 14% 13ft M —ft 

- 7« 9ft 8% 9% +% 

_ 37 17W 17 17ft — >6 

_ 942 3'4 2ft 3% —Vi 

- 9021 11% II 11% - 

_ 3494 13W II 12W ‘IW 

- 399 7 6% 4*6 ‘ft 

_ 364 7% AM 6% — M 

- 81317 16 X6M ‘M 

_ 43B7 4D'/, 37% 37% — 3% 

A7 1* 81 4% 4% «M +% 

.12 1.0 653 T2W 11% ll«ft. +%, 

UntaWi - 2155 3Vu 3V» 3 — Vu 

unflob _ 9422 5% 4W 4% — M 

Urarned „ 465 3ft 3ft 3M . Vu 

UnBnk 1*0 4* 1475 30 28% 29ft —ft 

UnBnfcpf 2A9 9.1 341 5ft 23 O _ 

UnBkCg 50 IJ X 26 26 34 —ft 

UntanBsfi TAD 12J 134 B 7M 8 ‘% 

- josrt. 30 30W +M 

1294 L5» MW 15 —16 

2882 13ft 12% 13% *W 
824 4 3ft 3M 
51 UW 24% 24ft — % 
232 26% 25% 2SM _ 
_ — 312 14ft 15W 16 —ft 
*0blJ 2308 33ft 31ft 33ft ‘W 
.14 1.1 29215ft 14ft 19 —ft 

2*2 41 42 +% 

1275 4W 5% 5% —ft 
IBS 31 30ft 30ft - 
1421 15% 14% 15 ‘ft 
68 36% 35% 35% 

. 2 16ft 14ft 16ft 
160 Tft 6W 7ft 

— ... 6518% 17ft lift ‘ft 

USBcOR 1 A0 4J 11170 MW 23ft Z3M — 
USBnpf 7A3 BJ 59723ft 23% 23ft - 


Uniphase 

UnrvTTC - 

UBWV TAB 4* 
“ 3* 


^ i5 


1A8 2 J 



lABb 3A 


USvBk 


36 4.1 


USEnr 
US Fad 
usHims 


- 146 4ft 3% 


‘Vu 


M 


1.944450 47% 43W ... 

- 7S4 3 2% 2ft —ft 

- 14 4ft 5ft 5ft - 

- 4881 10% 9% 10% ‘M 
t _ 294 BW 7ft 7% — Vu 

-1213140% 38% 38% —ft 
200 33 174441 60% 60ft —ft 

- 449 3% 3 3ft ‘ft 
*0 4A 831 ID 9% 10 

- 4454 51ft 54 +3 

- 4420 23% 21ft 21ft —ft 

- 1503 24% 23ft 23% —ft 

. 151 IBW 18 IBM - 

1*0 16 378945% 44% 44% — % 
_ 770 6ft 5ft 5ft — 1 

- T9B7 AM 5M 4% *M 

AS J 1760 7 6ft 7 

- 492 3W 2% 3W *W 

- 244 7 4ft 6ft —ft 

- 520 2M 2% 2% —ft 

_ 130 3W 3ft 3ft — M 

_ 1536 7 5% 7 _ 

IJO 7* 258 17 15 16% +M 

„ 573 5ft 5 5ft — M 

_ 583 30% 30 30 

- 4381 3% 3% 3ft _ 

“JBV 

- 2312 4ft 3ft 3W —ft 


tynwek lAO 23 M037%36ftgM .ft 


TriPofyto 

Trtcorc 

TnadGlv 

TrtadSv 


- 4774 30ft »W . . _ 

_ 716 2% lft lft — Vu 
_ 452 IS 14% I4W — 
_ 1022 SVb 4% 4ft —ft 


VBond 

VLSI 

VSE 

VWR 

XSS3, 

VfMR 

vetnnnt 
VMAdCm 
VdLn 
VctfVls A 


Varum 

Vgrien 

VorSPrt 

» 

vecfroTc 

VenaoM 

Vfeidir* 

vwety 

Verturn 

Vert «* 

verltas 

VTFin 

VTTnMv 

Vena 

Vestar 

vertex: 

vmfli 

VeiOAm 

VetAmwi 

Vlagera 

Vfcal 

Vleor 

Vtorp 

ViOBn 

vwf-h 

VMDSb 

VideoL 

VfetfePr 

Vfewtg 

VBdngs 

VHSpM 


- 442 PA 4ft 5 ‘ft 

- 34581 13% 12% 12iVu +%, 

J2 2J 4213% 13 13% ‘W 

*0 4.1 *24310% 9% 9% —ft 
.ISelJ *4510% Tft 10% +Vb 

- «32 3ft 3 3% - 

- 1470 11% TOW. 11% — % 

J2 ii 387 lY^ ft -ft 
*0 2J 15530% 30ft 30W-rVu 

- 470021 19ft a — 1% 

- 236 8ft 7% 7% — % 

*0 1 3 1W623W 22% 22ft ‘ft 

- 1»1<% 16 M'A —ft 

- ?ft 7W — ft 

- + % 

- 1]2S 2% 3% 3% 

- 6983 2% 2M 2Vu —ft 

u. 266733ft »W a -lft 

_ 102 2ft 2% ZW _ 

•2* O 7Jm 6ft 6ft *W 

- *•% 22 —ft 

- 1650 15W M 15 ‘M 
JB 3J S>22V, 21ft Jlft _ 

- at 7Vi 6W 7 — W 

J6a “ 325!^ VL V. ZSmm 

- 18*3 5ft 4ft 5ft —ft ZgieCp 

_ 73412ft 11% 12 * W zSSwt 

“ ^ ’Mb 19% 12% -ft 

- SI V!f 7 % 7 * % 2Erp 

- 390 ift lft 1% —ft ZenLefis 

- 3513% 3% 3% .ft 2JK 

- 349 9 BW 8W — % 73— 

- 425? aw 25% aw— i zAo 

32 2J \t3TJ 24W 24ft-l“ 

: k k ISSF 

-10194 3% 20% 21% -ft ZvST 

- a57 J? a* - Zynaxls 

- 3 7 7 7 — % I Zvtec 


WOO, tat 


WbndSR 

WonpLcta 

XS" 


J4 


_ 1395 4ft 3ft 4% ‘% 

- *L 7ft »% 6% ‘ft 

- 1233 2ft 1% 1% — Vu 
IJ X36 15W 14ft 14ft— lft 

- 413016ft 14% 15% +1 

_ 93 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

2J 449018ft 17ft 18% -1 
_ 1701 7ft 7 7% 

- 2346 27% 34 34 —2ft 

_ 11813 11% 12% —ft 

2.1 8512 11% lift ♦% 

- >84 13% 13ft 13% — M 

- 3114 13% 12% 13% — M 

- IBB 6ft 6 6ft — % 

- 1580 5% 5%, 5% -W 

_ 464 8% 7% 7% — % 

WF5L A4 A3 893018% 17ft 17% — M 

ftstlgpc _ 923 5 4% 4% _ 

WM58 J4 42 20402 18ft 17ft IB _ 

- PK3J4 9J 172 25% 24% 25% _ 

(*D6A0 7A 369 88 B6 84 — 1 
1.90 8J 65 21% 71% 21% +% 

- 2 9% 9ft 9ft —ft 

_ 32 7% % 2% ‘W 

_ 3267 26ft 25% 24ft _ 
J 194424% 23% 23Vu— to, 

1A 5384 23% 23 23% ♦% 


J2 

M 


- 1689 5% 


5% *% 


Watrtn 
WertsnPh 
vranjns 
MtausPs 

SS3& 

WuePtn — 4110 10% 8% 9% — >6 

Wc jwJ Vltf _ 3084 12ft low lift —ft 

Wawer *4 2J l»i 20ft 20 20% — W 

Webaund _ W1 8 7 7% ♦% 

WbsJFn 32 2Jxl4IM21ft 20% 20% — % 
Wedoo 1*01162 4910ft 9% 9% ‘W 

IMS# - 1533 3W 3% 3% +% 

WmbSt . - 245825 24 ft 24% —Vi 

WdcomH _ 3543 9% 8% 8% —ft 

WMMBf _ 593627% 22W 23ft— 2% 

Werner .10 * 2495 UVi 25 a% ‘ft 

VWsbpnc *8 3* 253 27% 25ft 24 — 1% 
wesenst _ 714811ft 11 II 

WsfCsJCA - 99 % Vu Vu 

JO U X3011W l|% lift — % 

wBSnX .16 1JX1B9U 8% 9% +% 

_ 488 22% 21ft 27ft — % 

. __ 3.1 4280 28% 27ft 2SVu +ftl 

WAmBC *8 21 731 32ft 31% 32% ‘ % 

Wefttwnk - 51 6 5ft 6 +M 

WftStCOB JO 2* 2D49 2DW 20 20% *% 

WstDOt* w - 6B413M 12% 12ft —ft 
westerfed .16*1.2x172813% 13% 13% — Vu 
WtnBonk *0b3A 14214 13 13% — W 

waned _ 131 8 7% 7ft —ft 

WFdPR AOeZ* 10 35 33 34 .1 

WMfeTc - 4237 8% 7% 8% ♦% 

WWnCtaF .136 J 4S4 17% l«ft 17 ♦ % 

WnnPb _ 148713 lift lift— 1 

WsfWafr - 720 29 27% 27% —lft 

Westor _ 1143 6 5% 6 ‘ft 

VMptSlv _ 722815% 14ft 15V, +1 

WsfPBC - O 3ft 3 3 —ft 

WstwOn - 5*OS 9% 9% 9% — % 

Wetted _ 330 3ft TA 3Yu — Vu 

Wevco A0 2* 57 34ft 33 33ft — 

Wharf JO - Z2 Bft Bft 8ft —ft 

WHteRvr . _ W 33% 32 32 — IW 

WhMMS *8 2.9 1529 34ft 22% 23% — I 

WflFds _ 3435 15% 14% 15% ‘1 

Whdceu _ 14742 11% 8% 10% ‘2 

WhafrttV _ 389515ft 13ft 14% —ft 

WicKLU _ 187716% 15ft 16% ‘ft 

WByJ At *7 1* 8344 43% 43% —ft 

WRtamf M 2.1 910547% 44 45% — 1% 

wmsons _ 932035% 33% 33 V„ -V u 
WHmTr 1A8 4J 348725ft 25 25ft. —ft, 

Wlntf^vr _ IQB1 9ft Bft Bft — ft 

Wlnsfir _ 6791 7ft, 6>ft, 7V» *ft, 

WnfeFM. . _ 81 BW 7% 7ft ‘ft 

WUWtanH JJ 1.1 971 9% 9% 9% — % 

WWtofts A8 J 11711 10ft 11 _ 

USST* — - 585344ft 45% 44% +% 

fttoUm 38 IJ 494 ir* 16% 16% —ft 

WttiAvro _ 614724% WA 25% ‘ft 

Woodtf J8 23 *2215 14 14% — % 
WrkCopS JB IB 9714% 13ft 14 — % 
WWAcp 1477 22% TOW 20% —IV, 

WorlFd* .12 IJ 246 9% Bft 9% _ 

WorthgJn *0 1A 1505022% 20ft 20% —2% 
Wyman _ 1372 5ft Sft 5% — % 


XOMA „ 3830 3% 3ft 2ft -ft 

XRJta .16 * 407740% 36 19ft ‘3ft 

XcefNet - 902516% M% 16ft ‘lft 

TWnavaui - 45 5ft 5ft Sft —4b 

»ar - *319 2ft Tft 2ft, —ft, 

W»K _ 13323 59ft 51ft SSW— 3% 

»om -.1918717% 16 17ft —ft 

SW - 3016 22% 19ft 22% +2% 

Xvtecc - 1791 aft 28% a%— lft 


VeBoa GP .94 4.9 Z4 1?W 19 19 -Y u 

VorkPn A0b3A ^16ft Sft Sft 
Y«ws - jgL S n jjJL « .m 


Younker 


- 64 J7W 17 17ft , ft 

- 191 5% 4ft 5ft —ft 

- 418 7% 6% Aft — % 

- 8669 43ft 3ft 41 ft .3 
-121A32SW 21ft n _J% 
-13167 5ft 4ft Sft^Tft 

- 3«WA 27% a -% 

,jo 

: £2 Si A* a*:s; 
: IS W V%" :4 

- 744 9ft Bft 9* — % 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOV EMB ER 7,1994 


Pag 


i 

* 

late 



O N 


A Y 


SPORTS 


Hill Captures Japan Prix 


The Associated Press 

SUZUKA, Japan — Damon 
Hill of Britain beat Mi chad 
Schumacher of Germany in a 
driving rainstorm Sunday to 
win the Japanese Grand Prix 
and force a showdown in Aus- 
tralia next weekend for the For- 
mula One championship, 

A victory would have made 
Schumacher the first German 
ever to win the title. Instead, H31 
pulled within a point of the lead. 

As a result, the title will be 
decided in the final race of the 
season for the first time in eight 
years, at the Australian Grand 
Prix next Sunday in Adelaide. 

“It is a tall order to beat Mi- 
chael, especially with the condi- 
tions the way they were.” HM 
said after prevailing by 3.365 
seconds in his Williams- Re- 
nault. “It was such a lottery, 
with so many opportunities to 
mak e mistakes. 

Only half of the 26-car field 
was around for the finish at the 
3 .64-mile course. 


“I would be much happier if 
the championship was over” 
said Schumacher, who started 
on the pole in his Benetton 
Ford. “The important thing is 
that I finish ed.” 

HlU, starting second, took the 
lead from Schumacher on the 
19th lap, lost it on the 36th and 
seized Jt for good on the 40th. It 
was his sixth victory of the year. 

For Schumacher, Sunday was 
an extension of the troubles 
that have plagued him since he 
won six of the first seven events 
on the 16-race schedule. 

He was suspended this sum- 
mer for two races as a penalty 
for ignoring a black flag during 
the British Grand Prix in July. 

In August, he was stripped of 
a victory at the Belgian Prix 
when officials found that a plank 
under Ins car - — used to protect 
the driver — was too thin. 

Schumacher led - through 18 
laps before Hill took advantage 
of the German's eight-second 


pit stop to move ahead. By the 
23d lap, the German had fallen 
to fourth, behind Jean Alesf s 
Ferrari and the WDliams-Re- 
nauh driven by Nigd Mansell. 

Keeping his car light on fuel 
to go faster, Schumacher made 
a dramatic comeback to regain 
the lead on the 36th lap. But his 
for fuel four laps later gave 
the lead. 

Ukyo Kntayama of Japan, 
driving a Tyrrefl-Yamaha, sus- 
tained a minor leg injury when 
he crashed on the thud lap. 

Three laps later, the caution 
flag waved and the safety car 
appeared to lead drivers from 
the sixth through 10th laps. 

In die next three laps, with 
drivers plowing through pour- 
ing rain without the safety car, 
six more cars crashed, including 
Martin Brundle’s McLaren- 
FeugeoL It went through a 
fence on a curve and hit an 
official, breaking his leg. 


Despite Error, Silva, 
Wins N,Y. Marathon 

GaqriJedby Our Staff From Dispaukes 

NEW YORK — German Silva of Mexico overcame a near- 
disastrous wrong turn less Than a mile from the finish and 
overcame his compatriot Benjamin Paredes to win the New 
York Gty Marathon on Sunday. 

Tecla Loroupe of Kenya made a sensational marathon 
debut, finishing first among the women in 2:27:37. Madina 
Biktagjrova of Russia was second at 2:29:59 and Anne Marie 
Letko of the United States finished third in 2:30: 18. 

Silva and Paredes had been running side-by-side in front of 
the field for about three miles (five kilometers) when the 
winner made his mistake. 

■ As they approached Central Park, SQva turned off on 
Seventh Avenue instead of going another block and turning 
into the pari: at Eighth Aveune. 

He took about 12 steps before realizing his mistake, thank* 
to urging from several spectators ana police. Silva then 
reversed his course and began a frantic pursuit of Paredes. 

He overtook in two hours, 1 1 minutes 21 seconds, with 
Paredes two seconds bade in the closest finish in the 25-year 
history of the. race. 

Silva became the second consecutive Mexican winner of the 
New York Gty Marathon and the third in the last four years. 

Arturo Barrios, a Mexican-born American citizen, finished 
third. (AP, Reuters ) 


Concern Upsets Breeder Field 


Roam 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — Concent, a 3- 
year-oid who had not won a race since April, 
camft from the back of the pack to win the $3 
millio n Breeders’ Cup Classic at Churchill 
Downs, edging the favorite, Tabasco Cat, in a 
photo fmisfi. 

Concern, ridden by Jerry Bailey al7-to-l odds, 
capped a day that saw three favorites and four 
kmgshots hit the winner’s circle in the hotly 
contested seven-race, S10 milli on series. 

. European hoxses continued to dominate the 
grass races with Barathea, a 10-to-I longshot 
who has been running in England and France, 
taking the $1 minion Mile, and H kk an en , who 
has raced throughout Europe, winning the $2 
million Turf. - 

Both horses set track records on the firm, dry 
turf on Saturday. 

The victory by the Irish-bred, 4 -year-old Bara- 
thea denied the American champion Loire an 
unprecedented third successive Mile victory. 
Lure bid for the lead at the top of the stretch but 
faded as Barathea pulled away. Barathea was 
ridden by the top European jockey Frankie 
Dettori. 

Tikkanen, ridden by Mike S mith, has raced in 
France; Germany, Ireland and Italy this year. 


but posted only two victories before Saturday^ 

■ triumph, . •* - 

Concern, a Maryland-bred, horee, had run sec-- 
ond or third in seven races since he won da 
.Grade 1 Arkansas Derby in April. But on Satur-i 
day he made his usual run from fair back a good 
one to catch Tabasco Cal and win Americans 
richest race, 

“It’s particularly great because he’s a horse 
that tries hard afl. the time,” said Bailey, 
jockey. “All he needs is a decent paj* and a good.' 
trip traffic-wise.” .... 

The day’s opening race, the SI million Sprint, ' 
was won by Cherokee Run, the favorite/ Flan- 
ders, ridden by Pat Day as the heaviest favorite 
of the day at 2-to-5, won the $1 million Juvenile* 
Fillies, but. suffered two fractures m her right'- 
front leg that will require surgery, 

Flanders is trained by D. Wayne Lukas, the ’ 
all-time leading Cup framer, who broke a 0-for- : 
20 streak fra his first Cup victory ance 1989. 1 ‘ 
Another Lukas-trained horse. Umber Country, ' 1 

won the $1 milli on Juvenile, giving the Califor- .. 
Il ia -baaed trainer 'a sweep of the2-year-oid races- 
and his 11 th and 12th Gip title overall 
The45-to-l longshot One Dreamer, riddertby 1 
Gary Stevens, won the SI. million Distaff with a"V 
wire-to-wire run. 

— ’ 3 


SCOREBOARD 

NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



AUanttc Dtvtston 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Washington 

2 0 

1.000 

— 

New York 

1 0 

lAOO 

yi 

Ortondo 

1 t 

JOB 

1 

Miami 

0 1 

mo 

IVj 

Boston 

0 2 

mo 

2 

New Jersey 

0 2 

mo 

2 

PMiadeiphla 

0 2 

mo 

2 


Central Dfvtslen 


Indiana 

2 0 

moo 



Milwaukee 

2 0 

moo 



Oevelond 

1 0 

moo 

to 

Chicago 

1 1 

500 

1 

Detroit 

1 1 

mo 

1 

Altanta 

a 2 

mo 

2 

Charlotte 

0 2 

mo 

2 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Midwest Dtvtston 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Houston 

2 0 

mao 



Deltas 

1 0 

uooo 

to 

Denver 

1 1 

mo 

1 

Utah 

1 1 

mo 

1 

San Antonio 

0 1 

mo 

Ito 

Minnesota 

0 2 

mo 

2 


Pacific Division 



GoWen State 

2 D 

looo 



Portland 

2 a 

mao 



Sacramento 

1 0 

moo 

to 

Seattle 

1 0 

moo 

to 

LA. Lakers 

1 1 

mo 

1 

Phoenix 

0 1 

mo 

Ito 

LA. Clippers 

0 2 

mo 

2 


FRIDAYS RESULTS 

Mew York 33 27 36 24— no 

Boston 27 23 33 30—187 

MY: Smith 10-143-4 23. Ewing *14 W 21 ; B: 
Wilkins 7-20 9-11 25. Brown 5-M >3 14 McOm- 
M 6-102-314 Rebetmde— Now York 48 (Ewing 
131. Boston 51 (Rodla Montreal 91. Assbts- 
— New York 30 (Harper 11), Boston 22 (Wil- 
kins 4). 

Milwaukee IB 31 23 if-n 

Phfladetohto 24 10 27 17-86 

M; Baker B-13 3919, Confon 8-13 4-5 2& New- 
man ft-17 3-320; P : Bands T-l 25-521, Malone 9- 
171-1 IV. ReBaunds— Milwaukee 52 (Plndcney 
101. PtHkJdefpfifa 40 (Weanwrspoon 9). As- 
tM»— Milwaukee 15 (Mayberry 6). Ptiltadet- 
pWo 21 (Bams ioi. 

Ortanao 24 37 22 25—180 

Washington 22 25 37 24—118 

O: Grant Ml 4-9 20. O’Neal 9-IB 10-14 20. 
Anderson 6-13 44 19; w: GuglMto6-l4 12-1324. 
Cheanev 8-18 44 20, Chapman 8-18 44 21. Re- 
bands-Ortandon (O’Neal «), Washington 
44 (GvaUatto 11). Assists— Orlando 17 (Shaw 
6). Washington 10 (Stifles 9). 

Indiana 2B 25 22 19-04 

Altanta 20 23 21 28-03 

I: Jackson M3 0-0 21. Miller 8-148-7 20; A: 
WMIls 8-21 8-13 24. Ammon 8-12 7-13 10. Re- 
bonds— Indkm 56 (5m Its ID. Atlanta 60 
(WUIls 17). Assists— Indiana 17 (Jackson. 
Work mix) 3), Atlanta 21 (Blaylock 11). 

LA. Lakers 30 27 » 23— US 

Detroit 30 34 36 20— 90 

LA: Ceballas 7-18 8-10 21 V<xi Exei 11-157-7 
35; D: Hill 8-19 8-10 25. Mills MS 2-2 2a Re- 
h oee ds L as Annates 51 (Ceballas 14). Detroll 
56 (West 131. Assists— Los Angeles Z1 (Threat! 
6), Detroit 20 (HUI 5). 

Charlotte 24 23 IS 16-83 

Chicago 23 23 17 24—09 


Char: Johnson 4- T7 5-617, BinteB 7-13 1-1 15; 
CMC PIPPen9-16 3-4 22. KJY Stk owlak 5-104-4 
KRobQf m Chcrlfltto 44 (Johnson 8). 08- 
cdbd (A (Perdue 12). AssWs—Chartatto lb 
(Hawkins 4), Chicago 19 (Harper 6). 

26 21 : 

2 * 18 1 

Coleman 7-176-720. Anderson 5-22 1-2 14; H: 
Thorpe 7-15 34 17. QUduwon 7-18 54 19. Max- 
well 8-18 1-2 17. Reftotmtf»-Ncw Jersey 61 
[Coleman IS). Houston 50 (Thorpe, Otaluwon 
6). Assists— New Jersey 13 (Anderson 8), 
Houston 17 (Cornell 9). 

Go Wen State 38 25 33 B-m 

Sim Antonio 39 33 22 24—118 

G: SpreweU 8-229-1326. Hardaway 7-16 11-11 
29. Pierce J0-I4 2-227; S: Robinson 12-24 >327. 
Johnson 11-165-727. Roboands— Golden Slate 
42 (Su r ew c ll, Gatling 7). Sen Antonio S9 ( Rob- 
inson 16). Aidm Golden Stale 18 
(Hardaway 8). San Antonio 22 (Robinson 6). 
Minnesota 24 22 38 24—108 

Denver 31 28 45 26—130 

M: West 5-89-11 19. Marshall 9-18 58 26; D: 
Rogers 7-12 7-071. Pack 6-12 9-18 nstlth 7-13 
11-12 23. O. Ellis 1M2 1-1 22. Rebounds— Mto- 
nosota43 (Lasttner 71, Denver 48 (Mutombo 
10). Assists— -Minnesota 16 (Ebiev 6), Denver 
26 (Pack, Rose 6). 

Maxi 19 30 31 20—1(8 

Utah 31 32 33 23-119 

M: Rice 8-12 1-1 19. Smith 510 511 19; U: 
Malm 512 18-11 M. Homocek 7-12 84 21. 
R ebou n ds Mloml44 (Geiger. Sotley 7). Utah 
50 (Saencer 14). Aaists-AUamJ 24 (Cafes 5). 
Utah 25 (Stockton 10). 

Phoenix 36 20 14 29— 09 

Sacramento 31 31 24 21—107 

P: Manning 5164-8 14 Tisdale 51288 16; S: 
Williams 7-15 1-2 16, Richmond 7-16 54 28. 
R eb o unds Ph oenix 4* (Green 12), Sacra- 
manta 65 (Pohmlce, Grant 10).Assists— Phoe- 
nix 18 (Perry 7). Sacramento 26 fWilUomsi). 
Portland 28 28 38 27—121 

LA. Clippers 22 W 26 33—110 

P: C Robinson 511 12-12 22. Drexler 51559 
26; LA: Vaught 89 4-4 18 Dehere 512 58 19. 
Rebounds— Portland 71 IB.WIIIlams 14). Los 
Angeles 51 (Massentxini 121. Assists- - P or t - 
kmd34 (Strlcfcknxl7). U» Angetes 18 (Ddwre 
6 ). 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
PhOadeipMa 25 27 25 30—107 

Orlando 33 31 25 33—122 

P: Wright 521 7923.WcathenpeonU.1957 
27. Barms 64 84 21; O: O’Neal 12-21 59 3a 
Anderson 7-154-4 2. Rebounds — Philadelphia 
48 (Wright 15), Ortondo 56 (Royal 14). As- 
sHts— Philadelphia 19 (Wealherspacn 8), Or- 
lando 30 (Shaw 9). 

Detroit 35 22 M 28 15-11* 

Atlanta 38 28 37 14 8—109 

D: Hill 9-14*4 24, Mills 7-174-4 20; A: Nor- 
man 12-26 3-4 30. Augmon 7-12 1513 26. Re- 
bounds— Detroit 56 1 Milts 10), Altanta S3 1 Wil- 
lis 19). Assists— Detroit 25 (Dutnars 6), 
Atfcsita 32 (Blaylock ID. 
devetand 29 3D 34 23-113 

Cbartotta 24 31 26 28— W 

C: HM510442a Price 9- T74-5Z7.C: Burrell 
512 2-2*1, Cutty 814 53 17. Reboaods— Cleve- 
land 59 (Williams M). Charlotte 47 (Johnson 
101. A im Cl eveland 24 (Price ill, Char- 
lotte 35 (Boguns, Adams 10). 

Boston 28 32 18 27—103 

Indiana 31 32 21 28-112 

B: Wilkins 1522 4-5 25. Brawn 520 59 28; 1 1 
Milter 5-912-1224. Scoff 5143-4 19. Rebounds— 
Boston 54 (Radio 91. Indiana 44 (AZtavEs 11). 
Assists Boston 18 (Donatos 7). Indiana 23 
(Jackson 8). 

28 28 32 27—115 
19 19 21 26- 85 


H : Thorpe 516 09 15 Otatowon 516 54 23; 
M: West 6-13 53 1& Rider 514 1-1 i& Re- 
hae nds H o us to n 51 (Thorpe 14). Mlmsota 
38 (McnMI 7). Assists Houston 31 (Maxwell 
7), Minnesota n (Smith 4). 

New Jersey 33 38 84 19— 1(3 

Deltas 37 30 25 20—112 

NJ; Coleman 5-14 7-10 11 Anderson 520 >511 
X: D: Mashbum 12-24 5* 30. Jackson 11-2215 
f7 37. Reboao ds Hew Jersey <5 (Coleman?), 
Polka 66 (Jones 1 1 ). AUti New Jersey 18 
(Coleman 7). Dallas 26 (Kidd HI. 
Wosfahwto u 21 25 27 19 8—100 

CMCOOO 25 IS 26 86 7— 99 

W: Gugitotto7-M 2-5 19, Chapman 522 54 26. 
C: Plppen 521 1515 29. Kukoc 7-11 512 25. 
Rebounds— W as h i ng to n 54 (Mureson 8), Chi- 
cago 53 (Plppen M). ASSUIs Washington 20 
(Stales 71, Chicago 28 (Ptppon 6). 

LA. Lakers 24 20 20 14 9 4 

Milwaukee 23 31 19 24-97 

LA: Ceballas 515 2-2 20. Lynch 8-12 4-5 16; 
M: N ew m an 6-16 6-7 20. Baker 10-16 24 22. 
Rebounds— Las Angeles 35 (Ceballas 8). Mil- 
waukee SI (Baker 12). Assists— Ua Angeles 
15 (Dtooc 61. Milwaukee 21 (Barry 10). 

de 31 23 » 21— in 

31 29 20 24-104 
G: Sprewell 7-15 74 24 Hardaway 12-21 04 
28. PlorcB 516 88 25; D: Rogers 1515 2-4 22. 
Pack 612 54 17. R eb o un d s Golden State 44 
(Gatling 8). Denver 54 (Mutombo 13). As- 
sists— Golden State 22 (Hardaway 10). Den- 
ver 27 (Pack Ml. 

Utah 30 23 36 34-103 

Seattle 27 21 30 33-110 

U: Malone 11-21 44 ZT, Stockton 514 5-727; 
S: Kemp 4-9 li-n 19, Sdtrempt 44 1620 24 
Payton 1616 34 24. Rebounds— Utah 52 (Ma- 
lone ll), Seattle Si (Sdirempt 12). Assists— 
Utah 21 (Slock ton 10). Seattle 13 (Schrempf. 
McMillan 4). 

LA. CUppers 29 28 19 27— 95 

Portland 32 25 37 18— 1U 

LA: Mossemurg 7-11 62 IA Dehere 69 88 
16; P: Strickland 514 67 23. Drexler 1621 55 
41. Rebounds— Las Angeles 51 (Massenbura 
13). Portland 52 (Owdtey 11 >.Assfais-Loa An- 
getes 17 (Richardson 4). Portland 27 (Strick- 
kmd 141. 

i 1 “7* ’> 7 - - - -'iu. ■; 

RUGBY UNION INTERNATIONAL 
Ireland 26. United States 15 

RUGBY LEAGUE SECOND TEST 
Great Britain 8. Australia 31 

r- 3» 7 r .-y . .-ns-; -• r v — V 

ONE-DAY INTERNATIONALS 
Zimbabwe vs. Sri Lowka second m at ch 
Saturday, In Harnra Z h abeh w 
Zimba bwe innings: 2965 (50 overs) 

Sri Lanka Innings: 2888 (50 overs) 

Result: Zimbabwe won by two runs 
Zimbabwe vs. Srf Lanka third match 
Sunday, to H onx e 
Sri Lanka innings: 2964 (SO oven) 
Zimbabwe I mines: 105-9 (48.1 overs) 

Result: Srt Lanka wan bv 191 runs. 
TRIANGULAR ONE-DAY SERIES 
iwfia n. West uwHes. Root 
SotardOTf In Calcutta 
Indio Imtngs: 2788 
West Indies Innings: 202 (all out) 

Result: India «m by 72 runs 
THIRD TEST 

PaMstai vs. Australia, float day 
Saturday, to Lahore 
Pakistan first Innings: 373 


Australia first I mines: *S 
Pakistan 2nd Innings: -404 (all out) 
Match drawn; PtAisten wins series l-a 


PARIS OPEN 
Qaartorflnals 

Andre Agassi (I), UA. det Pete Sampras 
(1). U-S. 74 (68), 7-5. 

Sent Meals 

Marc Ra»eM14), Switzerland. deL Michael 
Chong (7), (J-S_ 8-7 (4-7), 6-X 6-4; Agassi dot. 
Serai Bruouera U>, Spoia 6L 6-4. 

Final 

Agassi det. Rasset, 6-3. 61 44, 74. 
TOPPER OPEN 
In Motaevfdeo, Uruguay 


Francisco Ctavet. soatn, del. Adrhxi 
Vofnea Rumania. 64. 61; GHbort Schatler 
(5). Austria det Karel Novacofc (4), Czech 
Republic. 64. 24. 64; Marcrto RDppinL Urv- 
ouay. deL Gabrlal Markus. Araonttna64. 62; 
Alberto Berasategut (1), Spain, del. Fabrka 
Santoro (7), 64. 34. 80. 

Berasategut def. Schaller. 7-5. 24. 63; 06 
yet def. FTIIpolnL 7-5, 84. 

BELL CHALLENGE 
in Quebec 

5lpgiev Q u ort erflpott 


Brenda Schultz (2). Netherlands, def. Linda 
Horvev-Wlld (6). Hawttnrn Woods. IIL74 (7- 
5). 34. 84; Chanda Rubtn (3), Lafayette. La. 
def. Potr taki Hr (7). Canada 64. 74 (74); 
Nafhaite Tauzfat (4). France, det Elna Rei- 
nach (8). south Africa 62. 84; Katerina M6 
leave (5), Bulgaria, def. Amanda Coefzer (1), 
South Africa. 84, 5-7, 7-5 
Semifinals 

Sebum det. Tauzlat, 84. 67 (84). 84; Ma- 
leeva def. Rubin. 4-6. 84, 61 

BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC 
la Oakland, COi ferula 
Q ucr t ei-fHi afa 

Arantxa Sanchez Vlcarto ()>, Spain, det. 
zino Garrteen Jackson (8). OS. 63. 83; Deb- 
bie Graham. U.L def. Jalene WOtoeiabe. UJ- 
84L62; Undsov Daveaporl (3). Ui-det Anke 
Huber (5). GcfmoiiY.62, 62; Martina Navra- 
tDova (21. Ui, def. Amy Frazier (*t. U^.74, 
84.61 

SemMoate 

Navratilova det. Graham. 34. 62. 74; San- 
chez VKorto def. Davenport 62 44 82. 


.** •-- *.vr. — 

- -', V ' - y*'-':; 


Seg am ent o 18. BoJHmore 0 
Calgary 24. British Colombia 23 

Top 2S College Results 

Haw the top 25 teams to the A ss oc i ated 
Press’ college football pofl fared this week; L 
Nebraska (168) beat Kansas 45- J7. Next: at 
Iowa State, Sat u rday; 2. Pwm State (80) beat 
Indtana 35-29. Next: at Illinois. Saturday; X 
ABtan (50) beat East Caronna 3621. Mata: 
vs. Georgia Saturday; 4. Rartdo (7-1) beat 
Soulhern MlsNastaPi B-17. Mart: vs. South 
Carolina. Saturday ; S. MkunK7-l) beat N& 10 
5yracuseZ74i. Next: vs. Pittsburgh, SatonJay. 

A Atabama (58) beat Loutakxia State 35-17. 
Next: at No. 34 Mississippi Stole, Saturday; 7. 
Ctaorado (61) beat Oktahoma Stale T7-3. 
Next: at Kansas. Saturday; 8. Ftortda State 
(7-1) beat Georgia Tech 41-10. Next: vs. Notre 
Dome. Saturday; 9. Utah (61) tost to New 
Mejdca 23-2L Next: at Air Force. Saturday ; 
10. Syrac wi i 162) tost to No. S Miami 274. 
Next: at Boston College. Saturday. 

1L Texas ARM (661) beat Texas 3610. 
Next: at LouJsvflto, Saturday; n. Washington 
(8-3) tost to Stanford 462B. Next: n. Califor- 
nia Saturday; T2. VlrgWo (62) lest to No. 23 
Duka 2625. Next : vs. Mary tend, Scdordoy; M. 
Cote r ad u State (61) beat Wvwntog 3524. 
Next: ws. Arkansas State. Sat u rday; W.Kow 
sas Stale (621 boot Iowa State 3626 Next: at 
Missouri. Saturday. 

16. Washington State (631 Iasi to No. 22 
Southern Cal 23- TO. Next: at Oregon State, 


lirt 

CFL Standings 


Eastern Division 



W 

L 

T 

PF 

PA PIS 

x- Winnipeg 

12 

5 

0 

616 

5*4 21 

x.Baltlmore 

12 

6 

0 

561 

431 24 

x-Taronta 

7 

10 

8 

476 

543 14 

Hamilton 

4 

13 

0 

421 

546 8 

Ottawa 

4 

14 

0 

480 

647 1 

Shreveoort 

3 

15 

a 

330 

662 6 


Western Division 



y-Coigory 

15 

3 

0 

698 

3*5 30 

i-EOmonton 

12 

5 

8 

467 

391 2* 

x-BriLCotumbto 11 

6 

1 

604 

456 23 

z Btenlcliawi 10 

7 

0 

496 

440 20 

Sacramento 

9 

8 

1 

436 

486 19 

Lm Vegas 

5 

12 

0 

437 

571 10 


wcBoched ptoyofi berth. 

1 title. 


Shreveport 2S. Ottawa 24 


Arabella 

Grand Hotel 

Frankfurt am Main 

The 

Grand Hotel 
of our Time 

Downtown location, 
complete health dub 
with indoor pool 

Speciality restaurants: 
lapanese & Chinese cuisine. 
Sushi-bar. 

Bar with live music. 

1 3 banqutf & meeting rooms 

Konrad-Adenaoer-Str. 7 
D-603 1 3 Frankfurt 
Telephone.: ++69 - 29 81 0 
Fax: ++69 -29 81 810 


Saturday ; 17. Vlratolo Tech (743 did nol etay. 
Next: vs. Rutgers. Saturday; 1ft. Arizona (7-2) 
beta CoBforaia 134. Next*, at No. 22Sauttiera 
CoLStaurdcry; 19. North CoraBao (64) Iota to 
Ctemson 2617. Next; at Wake ForesL Satur- 
day; 20. Mlcftteaa (63) beta Puntue 4623. 
Next: vs. Minnesota, Saturday. 

2L Oregon (74) beta Arimna Stale 3618. 
Next: at STantord, Saturday; 22. SoathernCta 
(62) beat No.teWaBbtngtonStateZFlQ.Next: 
vs. Nol 18 Arizona. Saturday; 33. Date (61) 
beat No. n Vlratnta 2625. Next: at Norin 
Carolina State; Saturday: X MtokM 
State (74) beat Arkansas (7^7. Next: vs. N68 
Atabama. Staordav; 25. Brigham Young (62) 
beta Narthrast Louisiana 26i(L Next: vs. San 
Diego State, Saturday. 

Other Major College Scorea 

EAST 

Air Fores t&. Army A 
Boston u. 28 Comectlait 9 
Brown 7X Har var d T7 
Dartmouth 14. Cotamtao 13 
Delaware 45. Lehigh 29 
Georgetown, DlC 19, Siena 18 
Hofstra 42. Rhode Island 16 
Holy Cross 27, Bocknell 20 
Iona 14. Canislus 7 
Ltadyette 14 Colgate 6 
Marks* 39, St Froncte. Pa. 16 
Mo ss ocb us etts 27. Norihoastarn 2* 
Monmouth. NJ. 1Z StoneMII 0 
Penn 3X Pri n ceton 19 
Robert Morris 38. Bethany, W.Va. 14 
Rotgers 38. Temple 21 
S. Connecticut 35. Cent. Connecticut 51 7 
SL Johrrt. NY 2C DuqueWN 7 
Towsan St. 36. Kutztown 31 
vmanava 35, West Chester 14 
; Wagner 4Z SL Peter's 3 
: Yale 24 Cornel] 14 
J Youngstown St. 27. Buffalo 3 
SOUTH 

■ Aia -Birmingham 19, Butler 14 
! Appalachian St. 41. Uberty 40 
! Befhunc-Caokman 31, Knoxville 24 
Centre 9. DovKfson 7 
a rode! C. TrirChattanooga 26 
Delaware SL 31. N. Carolina A6T 10 
E. Kentucky 34 SE Mbxxnl A 
Evansville 33. CumbertaiKk Term. 32 
Florida A&M 16 Southern U- 14 
Georgia Southern 31, Forroim 2b 
Grumbling SL 5L Alabama SL 34 
Indiana SL 28, w. Kentucky to 
Jackson St. 47, Texas Southern 41 
James Madison 38. VMI 15 
Louisiana Tech 38. NW Louisiana 28 
Marshall 42. E. Termesee SL 12 
McNeese St 34 SW Texas SL 10 
Memphis 17. Mlittastam 16 
Middle Term. 24 Austin Rear 3 
Murray SL ti. Morehcod SL b 
N. Carolina St. 47, Maryland 45 
Navy 17, Tukme 15 
New Hampshire 42. Richmond 14 
S. Carolina SL 40, Howard U. 14 
SW Loolstano 28, UNLV 27 
Scmford *a Morgan St. 34 
Tcnn.-Marttn 42. Charleston Southern 14 
Temessee Tech 24 Tennessee St. 28 
venderbitt 84 Kentucky 6 
wnitom 6 Mary 17, Maine D 
MIDWEST 
BowDng Green 22, Kent to 
Cent Michigan 44 Toledo 27 
ancfnnotf 28. Troy St 24 
Dayton 5B. Concordia. SLP. 7 
Drake 41. Wte-Ostikosh 7 
E. Illinois 16b Illinois St. 13 
E. Michigan *2, Miron 18 


Illinois 21. Minnesota 17 
Miami, OMo 24 Ball SL 21 
Mldilgan SL 35. Northwestern 17 
Onto SL 24 Wisconsin 3 
SW Missouri SL 33r s. Illinois 27 

Valparaiso 28. Aurora W 

W. Ill tools 42. jocksonvtne St. 27 
W. Michigan 15. Ohio U. 3 

SOUTHWEST 

N. IMnots 38. Arkansas St. lb 
NtchoBs SL 24 Sam Houston SL 0 
North Texas XL Stephen F Austin 33 
Okltatoma 30. Missouri 13 
Mce 17, Soulhsra Matti. 10 
Tarteton SL 70, Prairie View 20 
FAR WEST 

Bobe St. 34 Montano 14 
E. Was hi ngton 49. Utah St- 31 
ideho 21, N. Iowa 12 
Montana St 44 W. New Mexico 6 
N. Arizona 44 Col Polv-SLO 21 
New Mexico St. 24 San Jase St. 21 
Oregon SL 24 Pacific 12 
S. Utah 44 CS N orthrtoge 28 
St Marys. Cat 14 S u c ram ento SL 12 
Weber SL 40, Idaho SL 6 


Japanese Grand Prix 


Top ttateberisgodmr from the SJ4 fcltomc- 
ter OAf-miie) Saznke CtreaH, wtth driver, 
cn— try. make et car. tt— and w ln erte nvr- 
age speed: T. Damon RBI Britain. Wliltams- 
RenouH. one boor, SS m b wiIo a 51532 seconds. 
151J96 kilometers per hour (94114 mph); 2. 
Michael Schumacher, Germtmy. Bencfton- 
Ford. 4365 seconds behind; X Jem AlesL 
France, Ferrari, 52B45 bthM 4 Ntael Mao- 
■eO. Britain. WllHams-RenoutL 54074 5. Ed- 
die trvtaft Britota. Jordan-HmT. 1:42.107. 

4 Helm-Herald Frentze* Germany. 
SaubemtarcedoAl ^J63;7.MBca Hakklaen. 
Finland, McLaren Peugeot 2:02983; 8.Chrts- 
llae PltBpaldL BrazU, Fo ta warfc-Pont49 laps 
completed; 9. Ertt Corns Franca Lor- 
rousse-Ford. 49 lope; 18. mbh Soto, Finland. 
LatusMugen-Handa 49 taps. 

Grand Prix driver s tandtags: 1. Michael 
Schumortier. Germany,92 points; 2. Damon ' 
HUt Britain, 91; 1 Gerhard Berger. Austria. 
34- 4 Mika Hakklnm Flnkmd, 26; 4 Jean 
Alest Franca 23; 4 Rubens Barrfdiallab Bro- 
riL 16; 7, David COulthard. Britain. 14; % Mar- 
tin Bnmfla Britain. 12; 9, Jos Veretappen, 
Holland. 10; 10. Mark BKmdNL Britain, 4 
Canstroctare' stoadtogs: 1. Williams- Re- 
nault. 108; z Benctton-Fara. 103; X Ferrari, 
64; 4 McLaren Peugeo t 35; 5. Jordan- Hart, 
25; 6b Tyrrell-Yamcria 13; 7. SauberHHer- 
cedetb 12; I. Llgter-Renault, 11; 9, Footwork- 
Ford. 9; 16 Mlnordt-Ford. 5. 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Blackburn 2. Tottenha m 0 
Crystal Potoce X Ipswich 0 
Leeds 1 Wlmbtedon 1 
Liverpool l. Nottingham Forest 0 
Manchester City X Southampton 3 
Newcastle z Queens Park Rangers 1 
Norwich a Evertan 0 
West Ham 1. Leicester a 
Arsenal a Sheffield Wednesday 0 
Aston Villa 1, Akmcfic ste r Untied 3 
Chelsea Z Coventry 2 
Standings: Nevcaslte 32 potato Blackburn 
36 Manchester United 2X Nottingham Forest 
27, Liverpool 26, Leeds 24 Narwlrti 21. Chelsea 


20b M on ctmt u atv 19, Arsenal 19, Crystal-' 
PatacelV, Southampton 17. Tottenham iX' 
West Ham 17, Coventry 18. Sheffield Wetaws-’ 

day 14 Qoocns Pork RangerelS. Whnbtedxr’ 

12, Aston VHto W. Ipswich 14 tekesier 9. 
Evertan X 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION ' 
Cremanese X Sompdorta 0 
Ftoretafna. z Bari 2 .; 

Fagglo Z Cagttort 0 " - 

Genoa 2. tnternazkxiate 1 • *. 

AC Milan .1, AC Parma I 
Padova Z Brescia 0 ‘r 

Reggiana a Lazio 0 
AS Roma 1, Napoli 1 
Torino ‘vs. Jovetaus (rained out) - 
Standings: Parma 20 pointe Lazio IX Fier- ( 

•Mina IX Juventus 17. Rama IX Fooaia 14^ 
Bari IX Sompdorta IX Inter IX CagUaTtZ 

NUlon 1% Genoa IX Torino IX NapaN IX Qe- 

mottese 9. Padova X Reggtana Z Bresctoz' 
DUTCH FIRST DIVISION . J- 
sc Heerenveen a Rodo jc Kerkrede 1 £ 

GA Eagles Deventer 1, Snorto Rotterdam i . 
MW Moratrlc M X RKC Watawfik 1 
WUem II TIBairg X Ajax Amsterdam t » 
NEC Nnmeacn 4 Dardrechmo - -• 

rc ye n oord Rotterdam 1, NAC Breda 0 
FC Vtaendom a FC TWente Enschede 2 1’ 
FC Utrecht X PSV Eindhoven 2 
FC Gronlngan X Vitesse Arnhem 1 
S tandi n g s : A tax 17 points. Rada JC 17/' 
Fe re nonrd IX FCTwente M PSV 14JWW IV' 
FCUrechtlXWIttem II lXVltesseV.SparloX * 
Heerenveen 9. NECX NACX FCGranlagenX 

FC Vtaendom 7. GA Eagles 7, RKC X Qor-r 
drechfTO 5. 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Bordeaux X Auxerre 1 *■ 

M onteelH e r 1, Ulle 0 
Marttaues 1, Parts SL Germain 1 
Satat-EHcm Z Coen 0 " >■ 

Rennes X Nka 1 i 

Le Havre X Lvon 0 
Lens X Monaco 0 
Sochoux X BajHa 3 
Strasbourg X Cannes 2 
Nantes X Metz 1 

n e w ite m : Nantes 36 points. Paris SL pen- 1 
main 2X Lens 27,Cannes 27, Lvon 27, Bordeaux 
24 Auxerre 25 , Strasbourg 24 Sotot-Etienne.. 
21 Marttoues 23. Rennes 23. Monaco 2X Basfio’ 
19, Le Havre 17,Metel7, LUe 16, Sochoux IX’. 
Cam n. Montpellier IX Nice U 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Kaisorslautern X FreCburg 2 
I860 Munich 1. M5V Duisburg 1 
Hamburg SV 1, Bayer Leverkusen 2 
Bayer Uertflngm 1, Bayern Munirti 1 
Etatrocht Frankfurt Z VfL Bochum 1 
FC Cologne X Moenchenstodboch 3 „■ 

VfB Stottgart 4 Dynamo Dresden 2 
SdtoBw a Kartsrahe 0 
Standtaes: Bonasto Dortmund 18 point*. 
Warder Bremen 17, Moenchengtodbadi 14. 
VfB Stuttgart IX FC Kabentautern M, Bayer 
Leverkusm 15, Hamburg SC U SC Fretburo 
14 Bayern Munich 14 Karlsruhe SC 14 Eto-„ 
tracM Frankfurt T2. SchaFke It, Bayer U«r- 
dlnsen L Dynamo Dresden X FC Cologne X 
1860 Munich 6. Vfl Bochum 5. MSVDubbunil. 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Vtatadolld a Sevfita 4 
Oaportfvade La Canma X Real Sodedodl 
Cello X Tenerife 2 

Betts 1. Valencia 1 - 

Lagrones X Zaragoza 0 

Albacete X Campoeteta 3 

Athletic de Bilbao 1, Eswnoi 3 

SPoritrto de Gltan Z Racing de Sanftxxler 3 

Real Modrld 4 Attehco de Madrid 2 


4 , 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



1 SUBGO 

1 

nrrr 

Lu 


EMICH 


Tini 

■•1 


Iflorge ' 


mmmm 

m 

I INDUPT 



1 SJ 


Print. 


MungMIkMimt 

km Bw eiprtto m i nt st «g- 
ggdhrte d mmM. 

winmu 


MtaOWX PROVE FORGET HOflKOfl 


I'LL HAVE A ) MO/ \ 




BIG PIECE ] YDU'KE 



I 

OF PIE y ALREADY Sf^T 



I 

RAT J\ 






2 

! 




! 



■mI 1^1 

? 

ffnny-- 



5 

, 1 



L* 


THE FAR SIDE 


DOONESBURY 


To swbscrflb* in Switzerland 
hat coll, toll free, 
1555757 


NEll GETS MiSfMTtC SAL 
XAfm.,JU«XlSACCUSB> 
CPtr*Sn&RTmXNG,Af£> 
j&mam&NA/HAXR. 
mjpwfisrtGfimoFA 
CUXBBUSNg56/6SCCJfi1Bi 




BLONDIE 




,v_. 

V. 

fv" ■ 

& 

IV • . 

5*- : . 

V-' ; 

& 

1;:- 

n 

?■- 


: 

L- 

&■- 


(Z.~- 

1c— 

vr- ; . 
53J1 

V;y 


CS .- ; . 


C: 

tr_. 

5- — 







oocroR.rrs 

AL'S SABA €£, 
returning 
VOUR CALL 


“Whoal Hare we go again! ... 'Pony Express 
Rider Walks (nto Workplace, Starts 
Shooting Every Horse In Sight."* 



I'VE SOT 
;AJ SASKET IN MV 
EXHAUST MAW FOLD... 




























CJW li&jO 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 17 



wo 


0 A Y 


"-*td 

>5Ck 

vnf^nrsj 

i ?**% 

■y^Si 


■b 


r 0tj 


‘IS-.. 


Rominger Smashes 

ark 





d ,if ib 
> . l ~ a l 1 

I* , 

; 


oo^i^ the mathematics worked. 


•**? 

v 1 




!S 

;*a 

I s :r - 


'rilaiii 


‘iti- 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

PAWS -—.The numbers added 

and so it was t empti ng to believe lhat*Tony Rominger, who adores 
string at Ms computer to program victories oa the bicycle, was 
certam to break his own record for the hour’s tide against the 
dock. Tempting but naive. 

When Rominger, the 33-year-old Swiss who is ranked first 
among .the world’s professional racers, mounted the ind oo r track 
. i . 1 - in Bordeaux on Saturday, he knew the numbers: Each push of his 

bicycle'* enormous gear would propel him 9.02 meters (9.8 yards). 
If he could m aintai n a cadence of 102 revolutions a minute, be 
would travel 55.2 kilometers (343 miles) in an hour. That would 
outdo by nearly a kilometer and a half the record he set two weeks 
eadier. . 

Check and double check. In a 27-minute test on Wednesday, 
Rommger easily exceeded his record pace and said afterward: 
“Why hide it, I fed terrific. When it comes to power, I feel I’ve got 
iL Pm relaxed and confident, the record is already mine but fm 
staying concentrated and motivated.” 

Because the cautious Rominger rarely speaks that way, his 
ty$rds were respected. Nothing to it. 

■*Yet the hour’s ride — a man alone on the track, ""racing only 
against hims elf and the dock — is the biggest physical and mental 
cha ll e n g e in the sport. Since Henri Desgrange established the 
record erf 35325 kilometers in 1893, it has been pushed up in 
fractions by such champions as (Hear Egg (42 360 kilometers in 
1912), Fausto Coppi (45.848 kilometers in 1942), Jacques Anque- 
tfl (46.159 kilometers in 1956) and Eddy Merckx (49.431 kilome- 
ters in 1 972). Not until 1984, when Francesco Moser rode with the 
first disc wheel in Mexico City, was the 50-kilometer barrier 
broken. 

Those riders usually spent weeks, if not months, preparing to 
attack the record, as Miguel Indurain did late this summer, when 
he slapped a world championship road race that a»gmad designed 
for him so that he could concentrate on accustoming himself to 
the track. Riders also usually use special bicycles built for the 
occasion, as Indurain did and Chris Boardman and Graeme 
Obree before him. __ 

All three succeeded — Obree traveled 51396 kilometers in July 
1993, Boardman 52270 kilometers later that same month, Obree 
again, 52713 kilometers last April, then Indurain at 53.040 
kilometers in September. On Ocl 22, Rominger covered 53.832 
kilometers on the same quarter-kilometer track in Bordeaux that 
was used by his three predecessors. 

A mighty tune trialer in road races, the Swiss was nevertheless a 
bit of a surprise breaker of the record since he used what 
amounted to a standard bicycle and chose to practice on the road, 
not the track. When Rominger set off Saturday in Bordeaux, he 
bad a mere dght bouts* experience on the boards. 

By the time Ms total readied nine, he had not just broken the 
record but smashed iL As Laurent Fignotn, the retired winner of 
two Tours de France who now is a television commentator, 
repeatedly said, Rominger pulverized the record. 

■ ’ He covered 55391 kilometers — an astonishing 1.459 kilome- 

ters farther than his own world record and 2251 kilometers 
a IllPtK'3 farther than Indurain went. 

£ Personally, I didn’t think I could beat 55 kilometers,” Ro- 
imager said. “I thought that if I did well, 1 might do 54.6 
' ' ~ • kilometers. I really hit the Emits. 1 suffered a lot more this time 
than the first time:.” • 

• ' Thrusting a microphone toward him, Pigeon wanted to know 
■ ■ whether Rprainger had jjulverized tire record because of desire. 

The Swiss credited concentration. . 

' ' " “I especially tried to keep up my concentration,” he said. That 

; and bis legs, as he pushed the 60 X 14 gear that only Obree has 
exceeded. 

Why then does Rominger surpass Indurain so easily on the 
track and lose to Mm in the time trials of the Tour de France, 

'• - ■ - which the Spaniard has won for the last four years? 

Part of the answer is that Rominger is better suited to the track 
at 65 kilograms (143 pounds), 15 kilograms less than Indurain. 
v - The Swiss’s tight aerodynamic position never wavered Saturday. 

- ‘ And, as Fignon pointed out, the hour’s ride is a solitary affair. 
Rnrmnger did not have to worry that a rival — so_ often Indurain 
— would be leaving two minutes after him, learning Ms times at 
checkpoints and boring into Ms lead. 




Rolling Past Rosset, Agassi Climbs to No. 2 Ranking 


By Christopher Clarey 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Andre Agassi has 
led the tennis world up tMs 
steep, slippery slope before. At 
age 24, he has made more than 
his share of comebacks. 

It is perhaps too large a leap 
of faith to state that this time 
will be different, but on Sun- 
day, as he sat in the bowels of 
the Palais Omnisports de Paris 
Bercy with the television tights 
reflecting off Ms damp and fa- 
miliar beard, there was an un- 
mistakable whiff of perma- 
nence in the air. 

TMs version of Agassi not 
only says the right things. He 
says them calmly and with 
conviction, and it is that as 
much as his unearthly reflexes 
and baseline power that 
should send a chill up the spine 
of Ptite Sampras, the world’s 
top-ranked tennis player. 

“I always felt like when I 
was succeeding in the past, it 
was more of a relief," Agassi 
said after dispatching Switzer- 
land’s Marc Rosset in four sets 
to win the Paris Open. “It was 
like, ‘If I do well this week, it 
buys me some time.* But now, 
it’s tike 1 wish I had to beat six 
guys in this tournament in- 
stead of five. 1 think that is the 
biggest difference: just my 
mindset. I want to be nowhere 
else but out there playing, and 
that is a great feeling to nave.” 

Agassi’s victory was his 
thira in his last four tourna- 
ments, a streak that began with 
his emotional ran to the U.S. 
Open title in September. He 
was unseeded at Flushing 
Meadow and only 20th in the 
rankings when it began. 

But he is now on a roll and 
Sunday’s victory vaulted him 



Andre Agassi dispatched Marc Rosset in four sets on Sunday to win the Paris Open, ins fifth victory of the year. 


past such familiar, more con- 
sistent performers as Stefan 
Ed berg and Boris Becker into 
the No. 2 spot. 

Agassi has never been so 
close to the top. Not in 1988, 
when he took the piranha-eat- 
piranha tennis world and the 
hearts of many an adolescent 


girl by storm with Ms two- 
toned hair and flashy fore- 
hand, topping out at No. 3. 
Not in 1992 when he roared 

back from a crisis of confi- 
dence to win his first Grand 
Slam title, at staid Wimbledon 
of all places, and finished the 
year at No. 9. 


“I really don’t have any re- 
action to being No. 2” said 
Agassi, who has openly set his 
sights on Sampras's spoL “1 
fed it is tike serving for the 
match. You just continue do- 
ing what it is that got you that 
far and don’t change anything: 
don’t lose sight of your daily 


goals. 1 mean 1 think it is a 
great accomplishment, but I 
am not going to really sit back 
and appreciate it until this 
year is done: There is another 
big tournament left, and it is 
an important one.” 

Although Agassi is not pre- 
pared to rest on his new laurels 


until after next week’s ATT 
Tour World Championships in 
Frankfurt, he clearly agrees 
with the computer’s evaluation 
of his form. Asked if he w as 
playing his best tennis ever, he 
answered, “Absolutely.” 

Getting the chance to play 
day after day has taken on new 
importance in the last two 
years for Agassi, An injured 
right wrist wrecked his 1993 
season. He opted for an opera- 
tion and returned to the circuit 
in Scottsdale, Arizona in Feb- 
ruary, Ms ranking at 32 and bis 
ambitions firmly in check. 

“1 wanted to see if could 
break into the top 25 this 
year” Agassi said. “At that 
stage, I was thinking only 
along the lines of, T love the 
game; I have the game, 

and I am committed to the 
game.’ I was willing to accept 
any thing that came.” 

A year ago, Agassi probably 
would not have gotten the 
chance to play Sampras in the 
quarterfinals on Friday and 

beat Mm 7-6, 7-5. Yes, the Tar- 
afiex court in Bercy was slow 
enough for Becker to call it the 
“Indoor French Open.” Yes, 
Sampras is coming back from 
an injury. But Sampras has 
seen enough of Agassi on aQ 
surfaces to know excellence 
when be confronts iL 

“He is going to be tough to 
beat tomorrow, and tough to 
beat for the next 10 years,” 
Sampras said magnanimously 
after Ms defeaL “1 think it is a 
rivalry that I hope turns into 
something special because I 
think we kind of bring out the 
best in each other.” 

Their sport could ask for 
nothing more. 


A Blast From the Past Sends Foreman Into Boxing History 


L 


By Tun Kawakami 

Lor Angela Tuna Service 

LAS VEGAS — It was a one-punch 
blast from the past, and after it landed, 
everything was chaos and uproar, dev- 
astation and jubilation. 

A single historic, shattering punch 
knocked Michael Moorer out and. for 
10 wild seconds and beyond, sent the 
boxing world flying off its axis. 

George. Foreman, Ms left eye badly 
swollen, Ms 45-year-old kgs giving way 
but Ms heart and power unquestioned, 
threw a lOth-round right hand that 
landed on Moorer’ s chin Saturday night 
and toppled Mm backward to the floor, 
arms splayed and feet in the air. for the 
10- second count and many more. 

With that self-described “ham hock 
to the chin” at 2:03 of the 10th, Fore- 
man made the past the future, altered 
the course of boxing history, and be- 
came the oldest heavyweight champi- 
on who ever lived. 

Then, with aftershocks still rolling 
Garden. 


toy, 

fainting amid the celebration, the old 


Ik 


The pressure cm Rominger could only be self-inflicted and he after 

seem^tohave apptiedri. As C^Guknard, the head of the brother * R<w ’ after 

Ca storarn a and a man who has guided three . riders to 
victories in the Tour de France, put it: “The only one who could 
beat Rominger? Rominger .” . 

Stephen Roche, the Irishman who won the Tour in 1987, was 
another notable at trackside. 

People used to say that Miguel Indurain came from another 
net/* Roche commented. “If so, where does Rotmnger come 
jtgr . ■ _ 

For now there is no answer. It may come in July, when the Tour 
de France begins in Brittany, with Induram again favored and 
Rominger a gain Ms main rival. 

»fti*n then, Rominger wiD feast on Ms triumph on the track. 

After he completed his hour; he took some, victory laps, holding up 
a finger — Fm No. 1 —to the few thousand fans. The boast was so 
atypical of Rominger that he changed to a full-handed wave 
before, with what for him was great audacity, he once again raised 
the soEtary finger. . 


man, the International Boxing Federa- 
tion and World Boxing Association 
‘champion, spoke about his past, his 
hope and bis joy. The future be left for 
others to contemplate. 

“I’ve been heavyweight champion 
before, so I know the feeling,” Fore- 
man said. “But tMs has been die great- 
est moment of my life. 

Describing the bout, be said: “First. 1 
took it easy, then I mounted the punish- 
ment He couldn't take it anymore, and 
he neve should’ve stayed in front of 
me. Tm a straight right-handed puncher 
and sooner or later I hit you.” 

What’s next for the man who came 
into the ring as the most popular fight- 
er in the sport and left it as its most 
unspeakably dramatic? 

Tm taking it one day a time,” Fore- 
man said. “My main goal was to be 
champion of the world once again, and 
stop being introduced as the former 
heavyweight champ of the world. 
Now, 1 will always be introduced as 
the heavyweight champion of the 
world.” 

For eman wasn’t speaking about fu- 


ture opponents, but he surely could 
gam title defenses against anybody 
that he and his promoter. Bob Arum, 
choose. 

Foreman (73-4, 68 knockouts) en- 
tered the fight with strong public sup- 
port and a puncher's chance against 
the previously undefeated Moorer, 26. 
Foreman entered the ring to a raucous 
standing ovation. Moorer received 
scattered boos and applause. 

Once Moorer began looking com- 
fortable and in control, and kept domi- 
nating up until the last blast, even the 
doubts about his shaky chin seemed to 
evaporate simply because Foreman 
could not strike him deanly. 

That only set up the drama. 
Foreman, at times in the early going, 


Moorer scored with a heavy over- 
hand right in the third round, sending 
Foreman backpedaling. It would not 
be the last time Moorer’s crisp blows 
staggered Foreman. 

According to CompuBox Inc. statis- 
tics. through the first nine rounds, 
Moorer landed 243 jabs to Foreman’s 
103, and connected wiib 348 total 
punches — 149 more than Foreman. 

At the time of the knockout, Moorer 
led by five points on two judges’ cards 
and by one point on the third. 

“Ii didn’t even matter,” Foreman 
said of all the rounds he knew he was 
losing. “I wasn’t ever going for the 
score. 1 was keeping the jab up and 


left eye 
’t fed 


rui ouau, 11 . umw m lutcoii; p-iug, ^j rjnp watc hmz Ms face.* 
looked slow and unable to find Moorer wattm8, g 

with the aU-important right — similar Throughout the fight, Moorer’s 
to the way he lost to Tommy Morrison trainer, Teddy Atlas, warned Ms fight- 
17 months ago in his last fight- er, 28 pounds (123 kilograms) lighter 

The left-handed Moorer spliced than Foreman, to take better care to 
Foreman’s front attack with snapping circle to Ms right and stay away from 
right jabs that swelled up Foreman's Foreman’s potent right hand, the m ain 
left eye and an in-and-out movement weapon that has given Foreman the 
that brought his right bard onto Fore- greatest knockout record in the history 
man’s chin several times. of the heavyweight division. 


— “I didn’t fed urgency, I felt half- 
blind,” Foreman said — the ninth was 
Foreman's most inactive round as 
Moorer bounced jabs off his face. 

But Foreman, s ensing something, 
opened the 10th firing his right and 
caught Moorer twice in the first mo- 
ments erf the round. Moorer recovered, 
then appeared to relax and stepped 
slowly backward after fending off a 
soft Foreman party almost one minute 
into the round. 

Foreman, pouncing on the chance 
he had awaited, stuck a left jab into 
Moorcr’s face, then released the most 
important punch of Ms life, a punch 
that struck with a dull thud and a 
monstrous audience roar. 

“He didn’t see the punch coming,” 
Adas said. “It was the best punch 
George threw all night That’s what we 
were afraid of.” 

Afterward, Moorer (35-1), whose 
motivation to fight has been ques- 
tioned before, said be would have to 
think about whether be will fight 
again. And he was calm and matter-of- 
fact explaining the loss. 


NavrotUomRcrtliestoGiJm 

The Associated Pros 

OAKLAND, California (AP) — Martina Navratilova rallied 
a gain in the Bank of the West Classic, surviving IS aces by 
Debbie Graham to reach the final with a 3-6, 6-2 7-5 victory. 

Navratilova, who has lost the first set in each of her three 
victories, was to face Arantxa Sanchez Vicario in Sunday’s 
final- Sanchez Vicario defeated Lindsay Davenport, 6-2 4-6. 
6-3, in the semifinals. 

TMs is the next-to-last tournament for Navratilova, 38, who 
has a record 167 singles titles. She is to retire after the Virginia 
Sims Championships, winch begin Nov. 14 in New York. 


SIDELINES 


CROSSWORD 


. ACROSS 

i throar 

(winter ailment) 
eDuefists* steps 
it *20/20* network 


i4 Actress Dunne 
ts Spartan 
magistrate 
uiinteiTntn&ble 
ride 

16 Heavy reading 


TWA 

The most comfortable way to fly.™ 


wvn® a guest ran freh 

CAliTWA F0RMTAII3 


20 Mine yield 
si Parade stopper 
22 Zenrrri 
23Eacri 

aa Paragraph start 
~ar AP. co mp eti tor " 
29 Where ships run . 
aground 

si Patio 

32 Grand s ite? 

35 Speaker’s stand 
-37 German article 
ss “Sting like a 
bee" champion 
at Gum ball 

41 Sony rival 

42 Bit of butter * 

42 Castaway's call 
44 Mighty mite 

4* Portuguese 
-money 
4a Suffer with 
- correspond 
<48 Client 
~ si Unit of radio 
frequency: 

AbOr 
82 Zone 

55 'Savvy'?* 

57 Poet Pound 

so Diamond 

•« Diamonds, In 
slang 

62 Applaud 

63 Children's 
same 

s7 Kind of closet 
os Taco sauce 
66 Understand 
. 70 Amherst school, 
for short 
ti More Crafty 

DOWN 

1 Sisorbro 


2 Scout unit 
a Parent. e.g 

4 Went in 

5 Letterrnan's 

Stupid 

- Tricks 

6 Nut fora 
nutcracker 

7 Plant louse 
6 Intricate 

- problems 
• Longtime 
lOMatamorosMra. 
11 Nick and Nora’s 

pooch 
18 Coalition 
« Mao's domain 

17 Lachrymose 

18 Aperture 

ss Spring nymph 

.25 Lone Ranger 's 

- pal 

28 Hawkeye State 
ao Canal site 
88 Gardner's 
stories 

33 Single 

34 ITS way" 

88 R's between 

Aka. and Man. 

«o John 

Passes 

457heMot*M.E.- 
47 One means of 

payment 
ao With 

bounteousness 
saShades 
84 Unfolds 
96 Gaggle 

members 
ss Steak order 

so Church niche 
63 Actor Guleger 
8« Not her 
as Road curve 
68 Mercury or 
Saturn 



Weather Cancels Ski Cup Races 

SAAS FEE, Switzerland (AP) — Adverse weather conditions 
spoiled the opening of the Alpine skiing World Cup. forcing Swiss 
organizers to cancel Sunday’s women's slalom the day after 
fanry»U»Hf»n q f the men’s parallel slalom. 

Winds, snow and fog prevented preparation of the slalom 
course on a glacier at 3,500 meters (1 1300 feet) and swept away 
hopes of or ganizer s to possibly postpone the women’s race to 
Monday. The World Cup weekend in the Swiss resort was decided 
by the International Ski Federation as a rehearsal for the Cup 
races beginning Nov. 26-27 in Sestriere, Italy, for men and Park 
Qty, Utah, for women. 

The federation on Sunday rescheduled the men’s World Cup 
downhill renounced by German organizers in Garmisch to the 
Swiss resort of Crans Montana on Jan. 6. The Garmisch women's 
downhill was switched to Cortina D’Ampezzo, Italy, which will 
stage two downhills and a giant slalom on Jan. 20-22. 

Ban on Kenyan Runner Is Upheld 

MONTE CARLO (AP) — An arbitration panel has upheld the 
four-year ban on John Ngugi, the five-lime world cross-country 
champion, who refused to submit to an out-of -competition dop- 
ing test 21 months ago. „ lootf 

The Kenyan runner, the 5,000-meter gold medalist at the 1988 
Olympics) had appealed the ban handed down last year by the 
International Amateur Athletic Federation. He had argued that 
the IAAF violated Kenyan regulations when he was approached 
at his home and asked to submit a urine sample on Feb. 13, 1993. 



Alter Leading Bali Golf 


Reuters 

NUSA DUA, Bali — Nick 
Faldo blamed no one but him- 
self for being disqualified Sun- 
day from the Alfred Dunhfl] 
Masters golf tournament. The 
error cost him a huge payday 
and Ms second tournament vic- 
tory erf the year, as John Kay of 
Canada went on to win by a 
stroke, ahead of Pat Burke of 
the United States, with a 1-over 
72 for a 7-under total of 277. 

Faldo was 15-under par and 
six shots clear of the field, with 
the $62,000 first-place money in 
the bag when the drama came 
on the 12th green on the final 
round at the Bah Golf and 
Country Club course. 

It was only then that it was 
discovered that the British play- 
er had unknowingly erred on 
Saturday by removing a piece of 
coral from a bunker at the sec- 


Faldo accepted that, explain- 
ing he had thought he could 
move the object as stones can be 
lifted from bunkos on the Euro- 
pean tour. However, that rule 
does not apply on any of the 
world's other leading circuits. 

“I fell into the trap of think- 
ing automatically like the Euro- 
pean tour,” Faldo said. “It’s as 
simple as that. Td better get 
myself an Aussie rules sheet be- 
fore I come back.” 

• Fred Funk carded a bogey- 
free, 6- under 66 to take the lead 
after three rounds of the inau- 
gural Sarazen World Open in 
Braselton, Georgia. Funk, 134d 
in world rankings, provided a 
clear demonstration of the 
depth of talent in the game as 
he posted a 12-under-par 204 
total with one round to play at 
the Chateau Elan course Satur- 
day. He led by two strokes over 


ub uuuk « uu ~-i — « day. tie lea Dy two siroxes over 

Seven days after his refusal, Ngugi. in the presence of Kenyan ond hole during the thud round, Angel fimmez of Spain, 

fidals, submitted to the test. The sample proved negative, but contravening the Rules of Golf. ^ birdiea the final bole for 

. r a 4 *4. J L.*> M.iJfil vviAiirn 7 rn henrima rfAuiti m ■ « _ « « • _ . _ 


SiVew Yoric TmuoIErSied by fTUl Suxtc. 


Solution to Puzzle of Nov. 4- 


ncinnEiGiEHiQca naga 

DQEHUQaiiga gaga 

EDCSB0 SHB 3G1QE3 

onaoB aasgg 
anmHmaa 

HDBQQaina HMggg 

nsan sanaa aeon 
aulssaQ Qaaaaaga 
□into aas nsHHasa 
manna aBHaa 
HSSS BBS SSSSi 

□naa aaasasaaaa 




officials, . . 

the IAAF died Ms initial refusal in handing down the automatic 
four-year suspension. 

Another Clash in Baseball’s Ranks 

NEW YORK (AP) — Before getting bade together at the 
bargaining table next week. Major League Baseball players and 
owners clashed again over strike-related pay. 

The players union has filed another grievance and default 
notices against teams in an effort to get pay for 30 players on the 
disabled list during the strike. Even so, the two sides continued to 
talk about next week’s bargaining sessions, which are to start 
Thursday. Players and owners agreed to move the talks to New 
York from Washington. 

Murdoch to Back a Rugby League 

SYDNEY (AFP) — Australian rugby league clubs will be 
offered 2 million Australian dollars ($1.46 million) each to join a 
proposed super league, funded by the media mogul Rupert Mur- 
doch’s News Ltd_ news reports said Sunday. 

Plans for the reported elite league, fielding 10 to 12 teams, is 
expected to be unveiled later this week, the Sun Herald reported. 

For die Record 

Johnny Nelson of Britain outpointed Nicolai Kulpin of Ka- 
zakhstan to retain his WBF heavyweight crown Sunday in Bang- 
kok in a split decision. MW 


The breach normally brings a 
two-shot penalty but, because 
the discovery only came on 
Sunday, the Australasian PGA 
Tour operations director, Tre- 
vor Herden, had no alternative 
but to disqualify him. 

The error came to light when 
Craig Parry of Australia, Fal- 
do’s third-round playing part- 
ner, almost made the same mis- 
take in a bunker at the seventh 
hole on Sunday but was 
slopped by his partner, Michael 
Campbell of New Zealand. Par- 
ry played on but, worried, 
called for Herden on the ninth, 
asked about the rule and told 
him Faldo had removed a stone 
on Saturday. Herden ap- 
proached Faldo, who con- 
firmed iL 

“Unfortunately, because it 
was yesterday, he’d signed for 
an incorrect score which means 
instant disqualification and 
there is no way Nick can get out 
of that." said Herden. 


68 .’ 

• Bob Gilder managed to 
shoot 2-under-par 71 in strong 
winds to hold a 1-stroke lead 
over Fred Couples going into 
the final round of the Kapalua 
International in Kapalua, Ha- 
waii. Gilder stood at 9-under- 
par 208. Couples was at 209 
after a 72. 


Royal Ascot, 
The Derby 

and other major race meetings. 
Enjoy the day in Ihc comfort 
of a private box overlooking 
the course and winning post. 

Fur further Jckiilt rrmtart 

Charterhouse Mercantile 
Leisure 

Tel: UK (44) 628 669900 
Fax: UK (44) 628 663309 


ge 7 


aonse 
I two 
level, 
re the 
nond 
i shot 
g the 

heart 

•Outh 

uver- 

.wing 

slam. 


& 


The 

ast 

O 

iss 

JSS 

ISS 

ISS 





-6 e ao 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1994 


LANGUAGE 


Of Commas and Nobel Laureates 


By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — Tune once again for the 
coveted Bloopie Awards, recognition of 
Madison Avenue solecisms that sends thrills of 
Schadenfreude through the ranks of advertising 
copywriters. We begin with the least important 
award, “For the most egregious abuse of the 
co mma. " Push the envelope, please: 

We have a five-way tie. CBS erred in a spot for 
the mini-series “Scarlet L” (That’s the sequel to 
“Gone With the Wind." but CBS says Ted 
Turner’s outfit, which crwns that Him, won't let 
CBS use the title in its ads.) The network printed 
on screen: “Frankly my dear. I don’t give a 
damn" as a voice-over intoned, “It was the most 
controversial statement of its time.*’ 

Let us zero in on the statement that first used 
the word damn in modes. The Hays Office would 
never have permitted it, WUJ Hays once told me. 
had not Clark Gable, playing Rhett Butler, de- 
empbasized the profanity, delivering the line as 
“don’t GIVE a damn." The CBS line has no 
co mma after the sentence adverb frankly, al- 
though the “Gone With the Wind" screenplay 
has it with the comma, and an exclamation mark 
to boot: “Frankly, my dear. [ don’t give a 
damn!" (In Margaret Mitchell’s novel she never 
used the frankly.) In direct address, the name or 
its substitute must be set off by commas. 

The comma is also needed in Sherlock 
Holmes’s famous line "Elementary, my dear 
Watson." Holmes, however, never spoke that 
line, at least not in Arthur Conan Doyle's stories. 
(Basil Rathbone did use the phrase when he 
played Sherlock Holmes in movies.) With the 
comma for direct address, the familiar saying 
would also answer the question “What school 
did yon go to. darling?" Without that comma, 
dear reader, the copywriter has made a mistake. 

As has Toyota in this line: "To us. a successful 
business shouldn’t just try to make a profit, it 
should try to make a difference as well." That’s a 
comma splice: two complete sentences incorrect- 
ly joined by a comma. Toyota could have used a 
semicolon after “profit," or put a period after 
that word and started a new sentence, or added a 
conjunction: “profit, but it should try. . . 

Catching Toyota on the test-track turn is Mer- 
cedes-Benz. wiih its “Technologically speaking it 
had no rivals. . . . Even standing still the S 320 
easily leaves other cars behind." Both Techno- 
logically speaking and Even standing still are used 
as introductory participial phrases that cry out 
for punctuation to separate them from their 
sentences' main thoughts. 

Not to be outdone by foreign rivals, the Ford 
Citibank credit card, in conjunction with Hertz 
and Texaco, offers an ungrammatical rebate: 
“To apply see your Ford or Lincoln-Mercury 


dealer" An introductory infinitive phrase, like 
To apply or To run up a whopping bill, calls for a 
comma to separate it from the main clause, 
especially when misreading is possible. 

Fifth entry is “The Coca-Cola Company in 
collaboration with Franklin Heirloom Dolls, au- 
thorizes their first-ever heirloom collector doll." 
The comma after “Dolls” requires a balancing 
comma after “Company”; you could get away 
with no commas at all but if you're going to start 
down the comma road, you need both. 

□ 

In the field of word choice, an ad writer for The 
New York Times Magazine wins the coveted 
bloopie: “Whether it’s a city tower . . . manor 
house . . . or seaside cove, it’s here for you to 
dream on. And one day (soon, perhaps) to act on." 
The writer was reaching for a parallelism — dream 
on and acton — but dream on is a different idiom, 
something you tell a copywriter when he tells you 
he thinks he will one day be a poeL We dream 
about and dream of; nobody ever dreamed on 
Jcairie with die light brown hair. 

And now — in Prime Space — we come to the 
Most Horrendous Solecism of 1994, submitted 
by Thomas Luskin, of Bayside. New York. By- 
virtue of the prestige of the sponsors, it is the 
Super Bloopie. 

It goes to 87 Nobel laureates who signed an ad 
titled “A Call to Reason” in support of measures 
to control population growth. “The survival of 
mankin d, and of the earth which sustains all of 
us, are in serious jeopardy." it begins, and is 
proudly signed by wreathed worthies from Chris- 
tian Anfmsen to Geoffrey Wilkinson. Linus Pau- 
ling signed it, too, though he is dead. 

The inescapable root problem here is subject- 
verb disagreement. The simple subject is survival. 
That takes the singular verb is. Everything be- 
tween the word survival and the verb is falls in the 
domain of prepositional phrases, not pan of die 
subject of die sentence. Only if the subject had 
been repeated — ‘The survival of mankind and 
the survival of die earth" — could you correctly 
use the plural are. 

The Nobel laureates, or their petition copy- 
writer, would do well to study the similarly 
constructed statement posted at the entrance to 
Busch Gardens amusement park in Virginia: 
"Clothing with suggestive or explicit language or 
insulting statements is not allowed." Although 
explicit is a foolish euphemism for “obscene." the 
sentence’s simple subject — clothing — leaps 
over the intervening phrases to agree with the 
singular verb is. You can learn plenty at amuse- 
ment parks. 

New York Times Semite 


German Publisher Makes a Run at the U.S. 


By Katherine Knorr 

International Herald Tribune 

/T NE of the biggest publishing sur- 
v/ prises in the last year has been the 
success in the United States of Peter 
Hoeg’s “Snrilla’s Sense of Snow.” 
Translated from Danish, it has sold 
more than 100,000 copies in hardback, 
making it one of the most successful 
books in translation published in the 
United States in recent years. 

It’s axiomatic that Americans don't 
like foreign movies and they don't Hkg 
foreign books. Sonny Mehta, the edi- 
tor in chief of Knopf, was quoted at 
die recent Frankfurt book fair as say- 
ing that American publishers are the 
most resistant to foreign writing. 

“It’s very hard to persuade Ameri- 
cans [publishers] to take on authors 
they cannot reai” said the German 
publisher Michael Naumann who has 
decided, perhaps quixotically, to take 
up the fight. He is establishing an 
imprint of his company, Rowohlt. in 
New York and expects to publish his 
first list, of six to eight books, begin- 
ning in the summer of 1995. 

Is there a market? Nau mann thinks 
there is: “Serious books like serious 
f ilms have an audience." 

Serious books with limited audi- 
ences — whether it’s literature in 
translation, short stories or first nov- 
els — have been particularly hard hit 
by the recent bloodshed in the Ameri- 
can publishing industry and the over- 
whelming emphasis on blockbusters. 

‘There is no upside to [books in 
translation], except the feel-good fac- 
tor,” said Ed Victor, the London- 
based American literary agent, who 
says that English publishers have also 
lost interest in foreign books. “The 
people who run the conglomerates are 
interested in the bottom line, they are 
not interested in feeling good." 

The 52-year-old Naumann, who has 
lived in the United States, believes that 
he brings two things to the American 
market: a certain freedom from com- 
mercial pressure, and a great deal of 
knowledge about European literature, 
knowledge that has disappeared with 
the generation of German Jews, who 
left Europe in the 1930s and so greatly 
enriched American publishing. 

Rowohlt, an old and illustrious 
firm, is owned by Holtzbrinck. Ger- 



Mtchael Naumann is establishing an imprint in New York. 


iwidc OhJhamn 


many's fourth largest publishing com- 
pany, which also owns Henry Holt in 
New York, and is buying a controlling 
interest in Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 
Naumann says that Holtzbrinck 
leaves its publishers “a very, very long 
rein," and Holt win provide an um- 
brella for Naumann's imprint, making 
him “a small publishing bouse with 
the protecting arms of a large publish- 
ing house." 

Naumann cites “Smilia" as an exam- 
ple of the difference made in American 
publishing by European input. The 
publication of Hoeg’s book was the 
work of Elisabeth Kallick Dyssegaard. 
executive editor at Farrar, Straus, and, 
not coincidentally. Danish. 

Dyssegaard. who is responsible for 
much foreign fiction published by 
Farrar. Straus, is well aware of the 
resistance of readers: “It’s son of tike 
movies with subtitles." she said. 
"They’re afraid it’s going to be kind of 
difficult. That’s a real barrier.” 

"Peter Hoeg is someone I had been 
following for a while. I was sort of 
looking for the book that we could 
stan him with in this country," she 


said. “If s a book about a culture that 
is exotic to Americans, but it doesn’t 
assume an intimate knowledge with 
that culture.” 

About three percent of books pub- 
lished in. the United States in recent 
years were translated, about the same 
percentage as in England but much less 
than in France or Germany (about 12 
percent and 16 percent in 1990, accord- 
ing to Unesco figures). “America is a 
very parochial country,” Victor said. 
“American publishers think publishing 
ends at Monlauk Point” 

Although there have been a few re- 
sounding successes, like Umberto Eco's 
“The Name of the Rose" (published by 
the Helen and Kurt Wolff imprint of 
Hareourt Brace) and Patrick Suskind's 
“Perfume” (Knopf), and although Lat- 
in American writers like Gabriel Gar- 
da Marquez have an audience, there 
simp ly isn’t much interest in foreign 
fiction in the United States. 

IT foreign books are a hard sell to 
Americans, publication in English, 
particularly in the United States, is 
extremely important to writers around 
the world. “En glish is still the easiest 


language for a book to travel in," said A 
Dyssegaard, "a big Step to making von 
accessible to the world." 

Rowohlt has a good deal of cross- 
cultural experience. Founded in 1 909 
it quickly branched out from German’ 
language authors like Brod and Kaf- 
ka. It has a long tradition of publish- 
ing American fiction, and now has a 
list of more than 100 writers, ranging 
from Hemingway, Faulkner, Thom® 
Wolfe and Upton Sinclair, to contem- 
porary authors as different as Thomas ■ 
Pynchon, John Updike, William Ken- ' 
nedy and Paul Auster. 

Rowohlt has other ties to the Unit- 
ed States. When the Nazis came to 
power, they banned many of the com- 
pany's books by Jewish authors, then 
dosed the company in 1942 as “politi- 
cally unreliable.” Kurt Wolff, wfao co- 
founded the company with Ernst 
Rowohlt, emigrated to the United 
States, where he would become one of 
the greatest of Emigre German pub- 
fishers, founding Pantheon. “If I have 
a shining example, it's him." Nau- -- 
mann said. 

In 1990, Hamburg-based Rowohlt, 
which publishes 650 to 800 titles a 
year, set up an office in Bertin, “uj 
open a window toward the east," and 
now publishes the Hungarian Peter 
Nadas and the Russian Andrei Bitov, 
among others. 

Naumann's tentative list for 1995 
includes Herta Muller's “Haztier" 
which Naumann calls the “best book ft 
ever written on the effect of totaliiar- - 
ian regimes like Romania bn private 
life; a quintessential description of po- 
litical angst”; an essay on love by 
Nadas, and “A Violent Chord,” a nov- 
el by Irene Dische, an American writ- 
er translated into 18 languages but 
without an American publisher. Nan-. 
mann incidentally suggests he might 
become a publisher of refuge for 
American writers who have lost their 
publishers. He also intends to publish 
new editions of certain classics. 

Naumann gives himself five years 
to make it work: “TO ran through four 
walls, though maybe not five." 

Coming back to Kurt Wolff, he 
adds a “melancholy note”: “It’s an- 
other German going to America hut 
under completely different political 
and cultural auspices, not hounded 
out of Germany." 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Forecast tor Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



Washington. DC., through A lew showers ««■ be typical Rams left from Tyohoon 
Boston have dry weather Tuesday tor many districts Zelda may spill into souih- 
Tuesday then showers at Irom southern Scandinavia eastern Japan at midweek 
midweek Showers will ai and Britain to northern Italy Tuesday will have dry weaih- 
rimes dampen On la no and and Spain. A storm with er from Shanqhac 10 Tokyo: ft 
the Midwest V 3 r.c Oliver widespread stiowats and should hold through Thuis- 
throutjh Portland will have strong winds will begin mid- day Irom Korea lo China, 
frequent ran and wind, rainy week from northern Span ro South China will be warm 
weather is likely ,n California Britain; these winds and and settled Tropical down- 
bv Thursday rains will reach Central pours wifi erupt m Malaysia. 

Europe by Fnday Singapore and Indonesia. 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



High 

Low 

W 

High 

Lowp 

w 


C/F 

C/F 


OF 

OF 


Aidant- 

1854 

13-55 

K 

55 54 

14 57 

ai 

Amrawriirr 

li-53 

7 44 


M52 

7 SA 


Ataaia 

11. 62 

•I V 

K 

14 57 

j 37 


A1hon% 

16*.1 

10-66 

=c 

20 »* 

13 55 


Rnc «tona 

1J6f 

13 W- 


58 54 

13 55 

-A 

B-ftraua 

12 53 

6-i3 

1 

!|55 

643 


Benin 

!fSO 

4-39 

•.1 

846 

235 

to 

Brtroe« 

13-55 

T.44 


■1 5; 

7--A4 


Bo-lareni 

11-52 

6.-11 

V 

1356 

5 41 


Cooennager 

?>4fl 

6.43 


«.■!£ 

435 


CciMM SgJ 

13 « 

13-55 

DC 

I35€ 

14 5- 

50 

Du«n 

M/52 

7 44 

■r 

•2 53 

in 


EjjinOurgn 

9/46 

7 44 


•0 50 

"44 

X 


17*2 

9-ie 

* - 

14.57 

4 48 

'J- 

Fiandurt 

11 52 

6-43 

« 

943 

3 

sr. 

Geneva 

1253 

846 

sn 

"150 

6- 4 3 

sn 

HeCw*i 

4/39 

0 32 

C 

5-41 

154 


Kantrnl 

14 57 

a. -48 

K 


H-52 


LajPafcruc. 

2S.77 

18-frt 

* 

26 -r- 



Us&on 

16«1 

1355 

-J. 

:5 6r 

1J 55 


LonOon 

13-53 

7 44 


” 52 

e 43 

5h 

MjtW 

1559 

' 44 


1457 

eu€ 

zr. 

M»an 

14,^7 

7 44 

• - 

ir ii 

- 44 


(tow. 

1 ‘34 



4-35 

151 

'A 

MWKtl 

1030 

4.59 


10 53 

357 


MOO 

20-68 

15 52 

in 

T7.BT 

1152 

5h 

Os» 

4.-30 

C5T 

r 

4.-1? 

1 54 

sh 

P^ma 

IB *4 

13-56 


17.62 

14/67 

A 


13 'OS 

8 46 

•A 

U52 

7 44 

t 

Prrp# 

8 46 

4-3? 

t 

6 46 

3 37 

A 

Rcvijav, 

i, T9 

3-3‘ 


4 33 

255 

1 

Boe>e 

1956 

7 44 

X 

19 56 

H52 


Si PeiiojtnFg 

235 

•3 2' 

X 

i3! 

• 1 "31 

A 

SwcMtotm 

bun 

357 

■A 

6-a3 

235 

'.h 

Strasbourg 

13-SS 

6 43 

sn 

9-48 

6.43 

P 

Tallinn 

4-34 

1 54 

c 

5 41 

2 55 


Verwce 

r«i 

8-46 

X 

13.55 

8-46 

1 

rwm 

H-52 

6-41 

V. 

3.4fl 

4-29 

T 

w.iru» 

9.48 

459 

c 

8 46 

3-r 

1 

Zur*n 

8<45 

6/JJ 

so 

3.48 

5 -41 

so 


Oceania 


AucHarO 

2170 1457 I 

19-56 

12-53 in 

Svfwy 

22/71 1i«S PC 

20.68 

3 48 s 


Middle East 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W Hrjfi Low W 

CfF C*F C/F Cff 

Bern! 15 59 W 20*6 16*1 PC 

s’ ro m :a k is-si pc 

Damawa.-. tt ol r 16 61 9 4* VI 

JerusMm 18 SI II SJ c 16*1 12*3 Ml 

Lu»m JT-80 51'. , 24 75 11/52 « 

Aiwa*- 27.80 19158 K i7W 16*1 pc 


Latin America 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W High Low W 

OF OF OF OF 

Bue«tt,Aen 28«! 14.-57 < if.Tl l< 

Caracas 31-88 J*r5 pc 21/38 It 77 pc 

Una 24.TS 17.S2 pc Jl 73 1763 pc 

MancoCuy 75/77 9 , 4 a s 2$ -77 9 '46 pc 

n*> JiJajw.ro aaw 22.7 ! pr 31 in 21 TP pc 
Santiago ?a.75 6-43 pc 22.71 9 46 pc 


Legend: s-surmy. pc-pady don't/, e-ctauiiy. sh-shonma t-tiunderaomw. t-rwn. sf-srow flunfas. 
w-srow. nee. W-Weather All map*. forecasts and data provided by Accu-We*#hr>r. Inc. -■ 1994 


Asia 


Today 


Ton 

POTTO. 



Low 


High 



C/F 

or 


OF 

CJF 

BantfvN. 

295* 

22-71 


3056 

23.73 OC 


17 52 

9'48 


1355 

7 4< c 

Honghtno 

25-79 

18-54 


26-79 

11-68 s 

Mmta 

3138 

24.75 


31-88 

24.75 DC 

HwiC-Mi 

31 86 

1457 


3259 

14.57 s 

SevJ 

17 62 

337 


19.56 

8.46 DC 

9iang»ia- 

25 70 

8/46 


22 71 

12 53 s 

SniadoiB 

3056 

22.-1 

«i 

3085 

2573 sJi 

T.w 

26.79 

>5 61 


24.75 

1? 66 S7. 

Totcyr 

1864 

8.46 


21 70 

1152 1 


Africa 


AlgK-S 

20.68 

16-61 

» 

21-70 

16 El 1 

CapeTowi 

24 75 

ie-81 

S 

22-71 

10-50 s 

Cosariawa 

22-71 

12/53 


21.70 

1355 S 

Kuan) 

19-66 

8.43 pc 

2170 

7 /44 pc 

La^M 

31.88 

23,71 

4 

31 W 

25.77 pc 


24. 75 

13-SS 


24 75 

13 55 dc 

’•r*s 

22.71 

IJ55 * 

2373 

13S6 1 


North America 


Anmwg* 

i.ta 

15-6 V> 

•3.27 

4/18 pc 

a rana 

21.70 

8-46 o 

23/73 

12/53 p= 

Boston 

12-53 

</38 * 

16/61 

7/44 S 


CTitadO 14.57 7.44 > 15.98 5'41 pc 

Denver 76*1 104 pc 11-52 pc 

Daptn 1497 4/39 , 17-62 8 *3 pc 

Horsnau 28*2 23-73 pc 29 *4 2271 pc 

Hcuwjn 27i83 1355 i 7750 16 61 pc 

Los Angelas 19-66 1050 pc 22/71 13*5 pc 


Mans 

29-84 

22-71 

EC 28.82 

2T71 pc 

ttriwp* 

1153 

3/37 

PC 

10*0 

o ra pc 

Momai 

7 44 

■1/31 

PC 

8 48 

002 pc 

Hosau 

28/82 

22/71 


28-82 

23-73 pc 

NmYOOi 

17-62 

8/46 

s 

17-62 

8/48 s 

Phoew 

24.75 

12-53 

pc 23 .73 

11-58 DC 

San Fran. 

17*2 

8/48 

9 

16*4 

10*0 DC 

Soame 

9 48 

4.-* tf 

11.52 

6/43 e 

Tcmyto 

10*0 

104 

pc 

12*3 

•6.32 pc 

Wa^ngton 

18*4 

5.-41 

1 

13*8 

8-46 s 


Roman Glory: Plan to Restore Dignity to the Colosseum 


By John Tagiiabue 

,VfH York T:ir.u Sera.* 

R OME — It’s [he top. after all — it’s 
the Colosseum. So the an - govern- 
ment’s measures to restore dignity to the 
immense ruined stadium seemed fining. 

First, there were the Sunday pedestrian 
days last spring, when the broad Via dei 
Fori Imperiali. laid out by Mussoiini in the 
1930s as a parade ground. »as closed to 
traffic. Then came the lifting and shifting of 
curbs, to reduce traffic around the Colosse- 
um to two lanes from four, and setting aside 
a third for buses. No*, where traffic used to 
roar, gardens are being pian ted. 

The changes are an effort by government 
planners to relieve the modenTrity's pres- 
sure on the monument, which was erected 
by the Flavian emperors Vespasian and 
Titus, employing thousands of Jewish slaves 
brought from Palestine after the Rc»mans 
had destroyed Jerusalem in A. D. 70 and 
crashed 3 fierce rebellion. The improve- 
ments are intended to quiet the vibrations 
caused by traffic and reduce the exhaust 
fumes that eat away its facade of travertine. 


“These measures are more aesthetic 
than anything," said Giorgio Croci, a 
professor of engineering at the University 
of Rome. But they are the beginnings of a 
525 million effort to restore the monu- 
ment that had become the very symbol of 
the grandeur and permanence of Rome, 
even as time, nature and urban turmoil 
took their toll on it. 

Over the next four years, the Colosse- 
um’s soot-blackened walls will be 
scrubbed, its vaulting waterproofed, and 
studies will be conducted to find out just 
how much it is suffering from the modern 
environment. The project wiD be financed 
by Banco di Roma. 

“It will be turned into a permanent 
patient in an intensive-care unit," said 
Mario Manieri Elia, a historian who ad- 
vises the city. 

One goaL he said, is lo restore the stadi- 
um's arena and some seating for theater 
and concerts by covering (he warren of 
walls and passages that once lay under the 


arena floor and were used by the men who 
staged gladiatorial games. 

■On a recent sunny fall day, vendors 
hawked Colosseum T-shirts outside the 
stadium. Inside, knots of visitors stofU 
around the arena where patricians and 
emperors used to sit. Down below, where 
once stagehands handled tigers and lions, 
two cats squinted in the sun. But the upper 
reaches of the immense bowl until recent- 
ly accessible to visitors by stairs, are now 
closed because they are considered unsafe. 

The government has spent heavily in re- 
cent years to dean some of Rome's noblesl 
facades. Now, Renaissance and Baroque 
edifices like the churches of Sam' Andrea 
ddla Valle, Santa Maria Magginre and San- 
t'Agostino gleam as they mus: have when 
they were new. __ 

But for Romans this is no purely aes- 
thetic matter. The Venerable Bede, after 
all, the eighth-century English monk and 
chronicler, quoted the adage rhat “as long 
as the Colosseum stands, Rome stands; 
when the Colosseum falls, Rome also ends, 
and when Rome falls, the world will end." 





ASIA /PACIFIC 
AUSTRALIA IfflH-MMM 


CHINA, PRC* 44 

HONGKONG 

INDIA* 

INDONESIA* 

JAPAN'. 

KOREA 

UfiCJO 

MALAYSIA’ 


10B11 
BW-1111 
800-1X7 
001 801-10 
0038-11 T 
009-11 
iiv«: HI 
800-0011 


HFVIZtA|.AWi 

PHILIPPINES - 
RUSSIA '’(MOSCOW) 


njn-«n 

183-11 

155-5042 


SAIPAN 1 

TAIWAN ‘ 

tWiUNCi* 

ARMENIA ' 


235-2072 
ri»wnr.m 
4 m -mi 
OWB-102M-0 
««!■' ■-‘Mill 
EUROPE 


AUSTRIA -1 11 . ... 
BELS1 UK' 
BUL6ARW 
CROATIA 1 * 
CZECH REPUBLIC 
DENMARK' 

FIN LAND ' 
FRANCE 
GERMANY 
GREECE - 


022-903-011 
0-HB-1WMQ 
HO ISOu WIO 
99-38-0011 
00-420-90101 
8881-0010 
9888-1 D8-T0 

wi- ran 

0130-0018 

00-800-1311 


I -If. Jjla4. nil I'-il'i-.- il! • ■' -.if II Ilnl. I- 1 -i 
'.|M 9-iriil 1 irilllill ■•'’••I 'J'l''”* 1 1 1 *—! I »■ ! • 
-, M Jr.i.v*« I -I H-h 


0.14111 

I . ri.i II. J,,,. 11.11, |l.r 

null i '-n.lr. I-, n.i.ifi'i • allmy It I.,1 -i III 111 rift- I olfcO . lll.n- i- 

i --I* I. . in |. *.j !» n nl iff. I.ftn.- | -I i.4-i liNk |fc,«- r,f»i- >1 


HUNGARY' 

ICELAND", 

IRELAND 

ITALY'. 

UECHTarcTW 

LITHUANIA 1 

LUrfUBniiw: 

MALTA 

MONACO' 

NETHERLANDS' 


B0>800-011T1 

NORWAY 

800-190-11 

MfODLE EAST 

AMERICAS 

MS-081 

POLAND 14 ' 

OdBia-m-8111 

BAHfiMN 

8r*uni 

SRGHfllKM 

.iw-aooTWini 

1-800-550-800 

PORTUGAL 1 .. 

05017-1-268 

CVPft.C- 

. i®-9ttMU 

B0LW 

.. Q-aoo-m? 

172-1011 

ROMANIA 

01-MH288 

SJYPT 1 (CAIRO) - 

510-0290 

BRAZIL 

HB-B&1D 

155-00-11 

SLOVAK REP. 

08-428-00101 

ISRAEL 

1T7-1M-2727 

tJWkDA 

. 1-800-5752^ 

8C196 

SPAIN. 

900-99-08-11 

KJWAII 

run 

CHlf 

B0O-B312 

naiJimi 

SWEDEN' 

020-755-611 

LEBANON iBEffiim* 426-901 

COLOMBIA 

980-11-9010 

0800-890-110 

SWT7B0AH0 

ISS-W-n 

SAUWSfttttfi 

t -WV III 

EL SALVADOR’. 

ISO 

19-0011 

UKRAINE 1 

. 81180-11 

TURKEY- 

09-600-12277 

H0H0URAS 1 . 

123 

06-022-0111 

UK 

9&aO<B9-B911 

11 ARAB EUIHAFEC 

Su-rji 

uexilO'^' 

H5-BHI-4K'-J24II 

Hi. 1 * .Mih ns p y.irfJ limni' |.nc., 1 

i«im4 it IMWmT Wi- pin* jii &l.;ii„.4l il> ■■■ 

I»4n ja ullu c 1^1 1 Mllirill ,-nii. 


PANAMA. 


DAflOr 


AFRICA 


109 

191 


.000-081 

00111 

00-111-11 

06UU-I0 

797-797 


Find out what you're missing hi lb 
AT&T USADirecf* and World Connect Sir nee. 

just because you're out of ihe office doesn’t mean 
you're out of touch. SimpK dial the AT&T Access 
Number below of the country you're calling from. 
In a matter of seconds, you’ll be connected with an 
English-speaking Operator or voice prompt for clear, 
reliable connections to the US. or over 1(H) other 
countries. Charging it to your AT&T Calling Card can 
minimize hotel surcharges and assure you econom- 
ical AT&T rates, too. So go to the nearest phone .uid 
check in with those who said. "Don't worry about 
a thing. After all, that s reason enough to worry. 

Tn/eWorhl" Connections ' - 



AT&T 


' ir -nf‘i ll* till illinium •N*d ji.gl dii- |ri,|i |nriil if nl jvjiljHi- 1-,!! i 11 .-it • Vl P m-ibl J- i M» 


Vll4>i l «ni.|i.«H,^lr | 4k, k . ....ri,,,- .njrf.,1 f lfl W .i Jl... * jj. , „ V f 1 '"* 'i* r |W ,v.t J.. r rful I|i m mi|.' ^ 

1 H-. min.ir r,i,sihi .i.HlPe u-U* i» nrrt hiii'rm .■auifni-t U\T «.idJ tamm V 


lypji l> ij&£>